"Knowledge Through Education"

"Recent Finds ..."
Archive

(2003-2012)
Items are posted in the order they were stripped from the homepage this may not necessarily be in the order that they appeared.

Recent Finds! invites collectors to send in images of coins that feature an interesting error or variety that they have found recently.  Sent them with your name, name of photographer (if different) and a bit of information as to how, when and where you found the coin.  Use of images will depend on their quality, significance of the error/variety, and other technical factors.  The act of submitting material shall constitute an expressed warranty by the contributor that the material is original and owned by the submitter; if not, the source and permission must be provided.  Send to: Webmaster


Recent Finds ...

Miscellaneous VAM Dollars Reviewed
All images © 2011 Ken Potter  / Coins Courtesy of Bill Ewald
by Ken Potter -- NLG

      July 12, 2011 -- One of the first individuals who tutored me in the area of errors and varieties back in the late 1970s was Bill Ewald who is a past member both NECA and CONE (who most of you know later combined to form CONECA).  While Bill eventually strayed away from specializing in error-variety coins to numismatics in general, the error-variety bug never left him completely.  As such I always have to stop by his table at local shows to see what he may have found.  A few months ago, he handed me a batch of Morgan dollars and said, pull out all the VAM varieties and take them with you and shoot what you'd like. Yep, Bill couldn't help himself and just had to look through a batch of Morgans and catalog all the VAM dollars!  While none of the ones I show here are Top 100 VAMs (though he did have one in the group) I found them interesting nonetheless so I thought I'd share a few of the coins I shot with readers.  They are shown here with their descriptions.

http://conecaonline.org/image/18781Dol7TFVAM132BrokenNoseBillEwaldW.jpg
1878 7TF VAM-132 "Broken Nose" Abraded Die Variety

http://conecaonline.org/image/1883O1DolVAM5RPMBillEwaldW.jpg
1883-O VAM-5 Repunched Mintmark O/O West (Listed in the Wexler/Miller RPM Book 
as RPM#5 and is presumably listed as such in the CONECA files)

http://conecaonline.org/image/1902O1DolVAM79NearDateExtraBerryBillEwald2500W.jpg
1902-O VAM-79 Near Date/Extra Berry -- One of many known for this date/Mint

http://conecaonline.org/image/1902O1DolVAM79NearDateExtraBerryBillEwaldW.jpg
A closer look at the 1902-O VAM-79 Near Date/Extra Berry

http://conecaonline.org/image/1902O1DolVAM79NearDateOMarkerExtraBerryBillEwaldAr500W.jpg
This thin thread-like raised area next to the cotton leaf (on obverse) is a marker for the 1902-O VAM-79 
To learn more about this variety go here:
VAMworld - 1902-O VAM-79

1956 Proof Franklin Sports Nice DDR

http://conecaonline.org/image/195650cDDR0002FS802BillFivazImageW.jpg
Photo courtesy of Bill Fivaz

     July 12, 2011 -- CONECA Member, Bill Fivaz of Cherrypickers' Guide fame sent in this photograph of a nice tripled die reverse that is one of a number of new listings slated for inclusion in Cherrypickers' Guide To Rare Die Varieties Fifth Edition Vol. 2 by Bill Fivaz and JT Stanton.  It is listed by CONECA as DDR-002 - 2-R-II (3).  Originally reported to CONECA by Ed Raser, the variety boasts strong doubling to tripling on the Eagle's left wing feathers (viewer's right), tail feathers and a slight to moderate spread on  HALF DOLLAR and AMERICA, with tripling on the  F of HALF and last A of AMERICA.  Other doubling can be seen on the eagle's claws, the perch upon which the eagle rests, etc.

Two More Recent Counterfeit Varieties Revealed

http://conecaonline.org/image/19221cNoDFake500W.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2011 / Coin Courtesy of Ken Potter

http://conecaonline.org/image/19551cDDOFake500W.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2011 / Coin Courtesy of Ken Potter

      March 04, 2011 -- In addition to the 1869/9 counterfeit Indian Head cent highlighted above by NGC, I have also seen the two above counterfeit varieties of recent Chinese vintage (or so I assume they are of Chinese origin).  These were within a group of eight counterfeit cents that a local collector purchased through a vendor on eBay. He held on to them too long to get a refund so he gave the entire group to me for "educational purposes."  The coins included in the lot of Lincoln cents were: (2) 1909-S, (2) 1909-S VDB, (2) 1914-D, (1) 1922 No D, (1) 1931-S and (1) 1955 Doubled Die.  All except the 1955/55 had been toned to make them look like Red & Brown AUs or UNCs but were not particularly deceptive under magnification to any seasoned collector.  Nonetheless, the collector who purchased the group for somewhere around $2,000.00 was new to the hobby and did not suspect anything was wrong until months after he purchased them.  The scary part is that there are better fakes out there than these!  KP

1882-O/S Morgan Dollar EDS vs. LDS?
by Leroy Van Allen
(Originally published in Vol. 19 No. 5, September/October 2010 CONECA Errorscope)

http://conecaonline.org/image/1882OVAM3Flushfullbar500W.jpg
Image courtesy of Leroy Van Allen

    March 04, 20010 -- There has recently been some discussion (May 2010) about the early and late die states of the 1882 O over S Morgan dollar and the possibility that their die sequences were actually reversed. For over thirty years it has been documented that the die state of the three known 1882 O/S varieties, VAMs 3, 4 & 5 with only a partial recessed diagonal bar showing inside the O mint mark were the earlier die states.

See Rest Of Article

Rotated Reverse Proof JFK Found In Bank 

http://conecaonline.org/image/1983S50cProofRotatedRevJamesOblerofCA600.jpg

    September 26, 2011 -- James Obler of Fresno, CA reports finding a 1983-S Proof Kennedy half dollar while searching through coins he obtained from the bank.   Now if you think finding a proof half dollar mixed in a roll of other mixed date business strike half dollars is unusual, well, you are correct.  However it does occur from time to time for most folks that search half dollar rolls regularly, (mainly searching for silver halves).  But even more unusual about this find is that it has a massive rotated rotated reverse die!  The images he provided of it in the ANACS holder show the obverse positioned straight up and down while flipping it over to view the reverse clearly displays just far out of proper position these dies were when this coin was struck.  The variety is not listed as being known on the Rotated  Die Coin Census web site, (http://www.rotateddies.com), which makes it even more interesting.  Nice find James!

Wide AM's, Wheats & More Circulation Finds


Photo © Ken Potter 2000
Here is a closer look at the 'Wide AM' variety looks like. Also notice that Frank Gasparro's 
designer's initials, FG, are closer to the Memorial building than they are on the Close AM

  August 01, 2011--  Ken Carter of WV sent the following to me: "I read your article in Numismatic News about Wide AM cents so I went to the bank and picked up 400 rolls to search. while I was at it , I saved all the cents from 1981 and older. This took awhile but it was somewhat fun. Here is what I found: one 1998 Wide AM, three 2000 Wide AMs, one coin with a clip, one blank, one 2003-S Proof, one 2009 Barbados cent, one dime, 66 wheat cents with a 1936 being the oldest. Out of the 400 rolls, 5036 cents were dated 1981 or older. I hope these facts are helpful. 
    I thought you might also want to know, while I was at it I also picked up 20 rolls of Kennedy halves. My finds: one 1964, 10 40% silver and one 1993-S Proof. Now this was more fun than pennies and only a few hours to go through them." KP

Centralized Double Die Found On 1964 Canadian Cent

http://conecaonline.org/image/1964CanadaExtraStem2of2RobertWilharmWAr.jpg

August 06, 2011 -- Robert Wilharm sent in this image of a Canadian 1964 cent with a centralized doubled die evident as an extra stem within the Maple Leaf sprig motif that dominates the reverse of this coin.  Our black arrow shows the displaced extra stem and the red arrow shows the primary stem.  While many folks feel that centralized doubled dies are the exclusive result of the single-squeeze hubbing process, this is one of many centralized doubled dies known on Canadian coins struck prior to the introduction of the single-squeeze process.  It represents one of a new era of finds that are piling up now that folks are becoming increasingly aware of these varieties and taking a closer look at their coins.  Nice find Robert!

Another Clad 1973-S Ike Found
Found in a bank at face-value!

http://conecaonline.org/image/1973SIkeOnCladBrnBG500W.jpg
Image courtesy of NGC
This is an image of the first one that was found in 2008 and graded by NGC as MS-67

    July 30, 2011 -- Coin World editor, Paul Gilkes reported upon an Eisenhower dollar recently found in a California bank that has been authenticated as a 1973-S dollar struck on a copper-nickel clad planchet instead of the intended silver-copper clad planchet. The finder, Lee Lydston submitted the coin to Numismatic Guaranty Corp., which certified the coin as a wrong planchet error and graded it About Uncirculated 58.  This is the second of these wrong planchet errors found since 2008 and suggests that there may be more of them to be found.

See The Coin World Story

See Ken Potter's Story On The 2008 Find

See NGC Story On the 2008 Find

Giant Die Crack on Franklin 50c

http://conecaonline.org/image/195250cScarfaceBillFivazImage.jpg
Image courtesy of Bill Fivaz

    July 29, 2011 -- Bill Fivaz sent in this photo of a mint state 1952 Franklin half-dollar that sports a large die crack on Franklin's face and down into the collar of his jacket.  This is the largest die crack I've ever seen in this area of a Franklin. KP

Recent Finds ...
Frosting Error Found on $50 Platinum
All images courtesy of NGC/David Camire

http://conecaonline.org/image/200750DolPlatFrostedFreedomFS901Ar.jpg

 http://conecaonline.org/image/2007W50DPlatimumTrialStrikeDaveCamireNGCImageMicro500W.jpg           http://conecaonline.org/image/2007WPlatimumNormallDaveCamireImage500.jpg

July 26, 2011 -- Back in a February issue of Numismatic News I wrote a feature entitled:  Do You Have Third Platinum Error?  Based mainly on this report, which a reader found on the CONECA web site that eventually linked him to the full report on the Numismaster website, I can now state that the third “Error” has finally been found!
   
 A collector who purchased three of the sets directly from the Mint when the offering was first made to collectors found it.  He said it was the only coin out of the three sets that had the word FREEDOM (on the banner draped over the eagle) fully frosted and that it was the elusive Half-Eagle that had yet to be reported.  It is only one of 21 pieces produced!  KP

See Numismatic News Story

See Coin World Story

See Another Related Story

See The NGC Story On The 1/4 oz $25 Platinum Variety

See The NGC Story On The 1 oz $100 Platinum Variety

Another 1969-S DDO Found!

http://conecaonline.org/image/1969S1cDDO001FoundByBrianOfTX500W.jpg
Strong hub doubling shows on the date.  The slight doubling on the east side of the 'S' Mintmark is
Strike Doubling -- all 1969-S doubled dies I have seen in the past three years showed some strike
doubling of the 'S' Mintmark to a greater or lesser degree (one showed massive strike doubling
on the 'S'. This should not be confused with the hub doubling all over the rest of the coin. KP

http://conecaonline.org/image/1969S1cDDO001INFGODFoundByBrianOfTX500W.jpg
Images courtesy of CONECA Member Charles Clark
Click On Picture To See More Images 

    July 02, 2010 -- First there was one, then three and now there are four 1969-S Doubled Die Obverse No.1 cents that have been found by collectors within just the past three years. Such a find is financially rewarding. One of them sold for $126,500. The valuable variety shows strong hub doubling on the date, LIBERTY and IN GOD WE TRUST. 

See The Numismaster Story 

See The Numismatic News Story

See The July 12 Coin World Story
(You must be a current CW Subscriber)

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: Webmaster  (please -- only email submissions).

 

 

Father & Daughter Strike Gold!
by Roger and Heidi Biller

http://conecaonline.org/image/19821cCuflipoverDblStrkOROVLW.jpg
Here is the 1982 Flip-Over Double Strike found by the father and daughter team.

    July 01, 2010 -- The following is a list of Lincoln cents found from May 1, 2008 to present day. We have searched 1,500,000 cents. 

13,000 Wheat cents including 5 1909-VDB's.
Doubled Dies:
1972 DDO-001
1972 DDO-002
1972 DDO-003 (3)
1972 DDO-004 (featured in Coppercoins.com)
1972 DDO-007
1972 DDO-008 (3)
1997 DDO-001
1995 DDO-001
1994 DDR-001
1994 DDR-002
1992 1DO-001 (3)
50+ RPMs
200+ Wheats with BIE die breaks and die breaks in letters/numbers.
1983/1985 reverse die clashes
1994 reverse rotation 165 degrees
200 Steel cents - found in seven hand wrapped rolls.
1982 Flip Over Double Struck
1988 RDV-006 Die #1 (3)
1988 RDV-006 Die #2
1988 RDV-006 Die #4
Platchets/Blanks (3)
Brass  plated strike cents (all known dates)
Cuds (10) - 2 Major 1998 Wide AM (64)
1999 Wide AM (2)
2000 Wide AM (117)
Over 2000+ error cents - grease, die breaks, etc.
1 Die Cap Strike (obverse)

 

CONECA Member Finds 2nd '66 DDR Cent

http://conecaonline.org/image/19661cDDRRickCarlsonSpecimenUNITE600W.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2011 / Coin courtesy of Rick Carlson

    October 03, 2011 -- According to a story in the current issue of Numismatic News, longtime Illinois variety coin specialist Rick Carlson has found what appears to be one of the strongest and perhaps one of the rarest Class I doubled die reverse cents known in the Lincoln Memorial cent series. He found an earlier die state specimen of a 1966 doubled die reverse in a high circulated grade while searching through change. It’s listed by the Combined Organizations of Numismatic Error Collectors of America as DDR-001 (1-R-I-CW) and represents only the second specimen reported in 12 years since it was first publicized in CONECA's Errorscope in 1999.

See Rest Of Story On Numismaster

See Rest Of Story On Numismatic News Website

More images can be seen in the hard-copy version of Numismatic News


1988 Doubled Ear Cent Found
http://conecaonline.org/image/19881cDDOEar2FS-101BillyCrawfordCoinArSubToHimByChristopherBeck500.jpg.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2011 / Coin Courtesy of Billy Crawford

    July 25, 2011 -- Just when you’d think that everything that could have been found that was major for a coin over 20 years old, up pops a beautiful 1988 Doubled Die Obverse cent that vies that of the famous 1984 cent. The doubling on the 1988 is very strong on the earlobe. Christopher Beck of FL originally reported the variety to error-variety coin specialist Billy Crawford of SC in early May. Crawford then purchased the coin and eventually sent it to me for my own examination and an opportunity to photograph it.  Hit the link below to read the rest of the story, see comparison images of the 1984 and 1997 Doubled Ear cents, and to see Jason Cuvelier's overlays.

See The Rest Of Story


Members Share ...
'72-D Double Strike JFK Found In Original Bag!
By James "Rick" Emery
June 10, 2011

http://conecaonline.org/image/1972DobvDS50c-2RickEmeryImage600pxW.jpg
Image by James "Rick" Emery
Click The Image Above To See An Enlarged View Of The Obverse & Reverse

    This being my first attempt at writing an article for ERRORSCOPE I pray you forgive me if it doesn’t chime as the other writers. I’ve been a collector of oddities and varieties for over 30 years. I’ve had some pretty cool items and found many way before the release of “The Cherrypickers’ Guide”.
    I’ll never forget the first 1943/2 Jefferson nickel I found. A super BU nickel with full steps! I was so surprised that I had one in my own collection I just had to send it to ANACS. This was mid 1970’s and ANACS was the only service for verification.
The 1970-S small date cent was a real blast for I was able to cherrypick many of these in proof and BU due to the fact that dealers didn’t know how to tell the difference from the regular issues.
    I will not go into the many finds over the years but I just wanted to share a bit of the past and one of my current finds. About seven months ago I was in contact with a family that was clearing out a members belongings due to a passing. There was nothing special in the hoard of stuff and they asked to buy at face all the modern coins they had. I was a bit hesitant due to the several hundred of dollars in modern change they wanted to move. Everything from cents to dollars and a few Canadian coins to boot. I loaded the bags and rolls and moved them to my home where my wife gave out an ‘oh no’ upon me parading the items into my workroom. She remembers the many weekends I would spend examining every coin I would bring home from my local bank.
    As I went through the multitude of loose coins, nothing really stood out so I would wrap these for disposal to that great local bank that doesn’t give out the bags of coins anymore. As I proceeded to check what wrapped rolls of coins, I found a minor clip cent that I felt pleased with. That seemed to be the end except for the mint-sewn bag of 1972-D Kennedy half-dollars. At first I felt this might be better to just dispose of at the bank as I had received it. Nope… cannot do that.
    I opened this bag and wrapped every coin only after a quick exam. ‘What is this?’ I exclaimed with total surprise. At first I thought someone was playing a trick on me but it came to me that this was an unopened US Mint sewn bag! 
   
I have examined this one Kennedy half-dollar for months and just am thrilled to have an item like this to show. I have not seen any other like it and would think I may never again. What a GEM example of a double struck half-dollar! A SUPER piece worthy of ANY error collector’s collection.
The photos I have provided for all to enjoy and to recommend that you never stop looking at your change … or bags. Have a GREAT hunt.


Recent Finds ...
Steel Cent Cud Found In BU Roll

http://conecaonline.org/image/19431cCudRevimagebyDavidWinnOvrLap500.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/19431cCudRevimagebyDavidWinnCloseUpAr.jpg
Images courtesy of David Winn

     June 26, 2010 --  David Winn reports finding a neat looking Major Die Break on the reverse of a 1943 zinc coated steel cent.  A Major Die Break is often affectionately referred to as a Cud, a nickname born in the early days which is one of the few that stuck to this day.  He said that he found it while searching what he perceived to be an original roll vs. a put-together-roll since many of the coins in the roll shared the same die characteristics (such as the same die breaks, etc.).  He noticed that this particular Cud is rather symmetrical "with sharp angles" unlike the majority of other cuds that are more often than not, "an amorphous blob ."   The zinc plated steel cent planchets used in 1943 wreaked havoc on the dies resulting in extreme die wear and breakage.
    Over 80 cuds are known for the Philadelphia issue alone and 51 for the San Francisco Mint.  Mysteriously and in shark contrast, Denver only produced a total of two cuds known so far.
    These numbers are based on the listings found in Sam Thurman and Arnold Margolis', The Cud Book produced in 1997 and their 2001 The Cud Book Supplement.  Undoubtedly a few more have been added to the list since then.  While the quality of the images in The Cud Book are somewhat lacking and don't allow me to to positively identify Winn's variety by it's listing number (if it is listed), it is without a doubt a neat find and because it's on a steel cent it's in demand by error collectors more so than other cuds of similar vintage.  To learn more about cuds, what they are and what they aren't, and a look at several actual dies that produced cuds go here: http://koinpro.tripod.com/Articles/WhatIsACud.htm.  Don't forget to visit www.CoinSpace.org while you're at it!  Winn, (aka TequilaDave), is the moderator of CoinSpace.   KP  


In The News ...
NGC Certifies 1892-CC Tripled Die Gold Eagle

http://conecaonline.org/image/1892CC10DolVP-001DDRNGCImage.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/1892CC10DolVP-001DDRNGCImageB.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/1892CC10DolVP-001DDRNGCImageSlab.jpg
Images courtesy of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation

    February 03, 2011 --  Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) of Sarasota, Florida has announced that they have certified a significant Carson City Variety.
    A coin submitted to NCS for conservation followed by NGC grading has turned out to be an unpublished variety. This $10 gold eagle coined at the Carson City Mint in 1892 bears a distinctly tripled reverse die, which is quite visible within the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. With a mintage of only 40,000 pieces this issue is scarce and popular with collectors, and it would have been coined from a very limited number of dies. It's therefore surprising that this variety hasn't been reported previously. NCS President David Camire spotted it while performing conservation work.
    NGC has graded the coin MS-61+ and labeled it VP-001. The VarietyPlus® numbering system is used by NGC for varieties not already assigned variety numbers in popular reference books, and this is the first variety reported for 1892-CC eagles. While the coin was not submitted for variety attribution, NGC believed this discovery too important to let it slip through without noting the variety. Collectors are urged to examine their 1892-CC tens for other examples.


In The News ... 
5oz ATB Grand Canyon Doubling
Not Doubled Die


What appears to be hub doubling (a doubled die) on date is actually Strike Doubling.


Another look at the Strike Doubling as viewed on some of the incuse lettering about the rim.


On the raised designer initials we can see both Strike Doubling and Flat Field Doubling.

     Februarys 03, 2011 -- CONECA Member, Ken Potter wrote about  a deceptive form of strike doubling in the January 20 issue of Numismaster that appears to show all of the characteristics of hub doubling on incuse areas of one of the newly released 5-ounce silver Grand Canyon ATB quarters minted by the United States Mint.

Read Story Here    

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ... 
Canadian Cent MAD Clash Reported
By BJ Neff, NLG

http://conecaonline.org/image/Canada19631cMadClashBJNeffImage.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/Canada19631cMadClashBJNeffImageb.jpg

    January 30, 2011 - One of the more rare types of die clashes is the Mis-Aligned Die die clash or MAD die clash. Up until recently, it has only been found on Lincoln cents from the years 1992 to 2000. However, a recent find has opened our eyes to other possibilities. This 1962 Canadian cent, which was found on E-bay, shows a clash mark made by the rim denticles of the die located in between the lobes of the maple leaf. The relative positioning of the dies to each other when they clash qualifies this die as a MAD die clash. It is now listed on www.MADdieclashes.com.


Members Share ... 
World Error Collection Put Online

http://conecaonline.org/image/1KronafullbrockagewithexpandedmirrorreverseCapMartinWettmark.jpg

    December 31, 2010 -- CONECA Member, Martin Wettmark wrote to advise members that he has posted his entire collection of world errors on Omnicoin.  You can see his page here: http://omnicoin.com/collection/mawett. If you enjoy world errors, you'll love this site!  KP


In The News ... 
Trail Die Found On NASA Medal

http://conecaonline.org/image/NASAMedalTrailsBJNeff.jpg

 December 31, 2010 - It came as no surprise to trail die attributer BJ Neff that this die anomaly type would appear on something other than a denominational coin. Ted Kruelski of Virginia submitted five "Apollo 4, Fortieth Anniversary" Medals for examination, three of which had trails from various design elements. The above picture shows trails from the stars and the left top corners of the N and A of NASA. For additional information on this newly discovered trail die, visit traildies.com

Members Share ...
Five Coins That Can Make You Rich!

http://hermes.csd.net/~coneca/image/19951cW10cRevMuleObvRevHAImage.jpg

Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions
Here's a 1995 1c With 10c Reverse that is on Justin's list!

    December 13, 2010 --  According to CONECA Member Justin Justin Duane, it’s the coin collector’s dream…buying a Big Gulp and getting back thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars in return. How? By receiving back an ultra rarity in your change! While unlikely, just 10 years ago, a few astute shoppers noticed that they had received a “mule” when receiving their change, primarily in the Philadelphia area…and today, those Sacagawea/Quarter mules are estimated to be worth over $250,000 each! The lesson: check your change. Here’s five coins minted in the last 50 years that could make you rich if you’re lucky enough to find one!

See The Rest Of Story


In The News ...
New Website Highlights Panama Errors

http://conecaonline.org/image/Panama1971FM20BalboasProofV001DDO001h.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of John Paquette of Positive Proof
Hub doubling can be seen on Franklin Mint Sculptor, Harold Faulkner’s stylized initials
found
within the lower bust of Simon Bolivar on this Panama 1971 20 Balboas Proof
coin listed in the Variety Coin Register as VCR#1/DDO#1. It is not on Plumer's site
but shown here just to catch your attention.

    November 09, 2010 -- The Warren Lloyd Plumer collection of Panama error coins including both minor and major errors is now being placed on NeoCollect Website.  According to Plumer, "This is an ongoing, long term project. When completed [it] will include around 200 pieces." Future additions are expected to be made sometime in the next few months.  You can see his collection here:  http://www.neocollect.com/coll/172.


In The News ...
How To Collect Error-Variety Coins

http://conecaonline.org/image/1939P1cCurvedClipObv500W.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2010

    October 09, 2010 -- In the Aug. 3 issue of Numismatic News, Ken Potter discussed the fact that there are many ways to collect errors and varieties with one of those being an assemblage of one of each error-variety type possible within a series. The series he decided to pick was the Lincoln cent since it is the most affordable and is one of our most popular collector coins.  He focused on showing errors and varieties that fell within the budget of the average collector.  In the current issue of Numismatic News, he continues his look at affordable Lincoln cent errors and varieties that folks may want to assemble into a collection.  See the current hardcopy issue of NN to view all the images discussed or see the stripped-down version with fewer and smaller images at either of the links below.

See The Numismatic News Online Version Here

See The Numismaster Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
Edge Lettering Missing On 2010 Sac $1

    September 27, 2010 -- For the second time in three years collectors are reporting finding smooth-edge "golden dollars" in official U.S. government issued Mint Sets!  The coins involved this time are Denver minted Native American dollars that should have been processed further by a Shuler Edge Lettering Machine but somehow bypassed the process completely or may have been run through it with the press assembly adjusted too light for the edge lettering die (known as a segment) to impart any inscriptions to the edges.  Two weeks ago 11 pieces were known and today the number known to me has only climbed to 16.

See The Rest Of Story   

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).    


In The News ...
Legend Sells Unique 1943-D 
Bronze Cent For Record $1.7 Million

http://conecaonline.org/image/1943DenverMintbronzecentW.jpg
Image courtesy of Legend Numismatists

    September 23, 2010 -- The only known 1943-dated Lincoln cent mistakenly struck at the Denver Mint on a bronze planchet has been sold for a record $1.7 million by Legend Numismatics of Lincroft, New Jersey. The unique coin, not publicly known to exist until 1979, is graded PCGS MS64BN.
    The new owner is a Southwestern United States business executive who wants to remain anonymous, but who plans to exhibit this coin and others in January at the Florida United Numismatists convention.
    He also purchased in the same transaction through Legend a 1944 Philadelphia Mint cent struck on a zinc planchet, graded PCGS MS64, for $250,000, and an experimental 1942 Philadelphia cent mostly composed of tin for $50,000. The unnamed new owner plans to exhibit these coins and others at the Florida United Numismatists convention in January.
    "The 1943-D bronze cent is the most valuable cent in the world, and it took four years of aggressive negotiations with the coin's owner until he agreed to sell it. The new owner is proudly now the only collector to ever own the all-time finest and complete sets of Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco 1943 bronze cents and 1944 steel cents," said Laura Sperber, President of Legend Numismatics.
    "The new owner is a prominent Southwestern business executive who's been collecting since he was a teenager, searching through pocket change looking for rare coins. As a youngster he thought he'd actually found a 1943 copper cent in circulation but it was not authentic. He still has that in his desk drawer, but now he's the only person to ever assemble a complete set of genuine 1943 bronze cents, one each from the Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco Mints. He will display that set at FUN along with his 1944 Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco zinc cents," said Sperber.
    The anonymous collector who formerly owned the coin "donated it to a charitable organization so they could sell it with all of the proceeds going to the charity," according to Andy Skrabalak of Angel Dee's Coins and Collectibles in Woodbridge, Virginia who acted as agent on behalf of the former owner.
    "As a specialist in small cents, this transaction is the ultimate accomplishment for me and I'm privileged to be part of it. I don't think it will ever be duplicated in my lifetime," said Skrabalak.
    Zinc-coated steel was used for producing cents in 1943 to conserve copper for other uses during World War II, but a small number of coins were mistakenly struck on bronze planchets left over from 1942.
    "We estimate that less than 20 Lincoln cents were erroneously struck in bronze at the Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints in 1943, but this is the only known example from the Denver Mint," explained Don Willis, President of Professional Coin Grading Service.
    Sperber said the collector's historic, mis-made World War II era cents will be displayed during the first three days of the FUN convention in Tampa, Florida, January 6 - 8, 2011. For additional information, contact Legend Numismatics at (800) 743-2646 or visit online at www.LegendCoin.com.


Recent Finds ...
Clashed Dies Prompt Repairs

http://conecaonline.org/image/2007-PJeffDolClashedRevRichDarby500ArW.jpg
Clash marks on a 2007-P Jefferson dollar submitted by Rich Darby.

http://conecaonline.org/image/2007PDolJeffersonCD002aaArW.jpg
Clash marks on the reverse of another 2007-P Jefferson dollar submitted by Gerald Weakland.

http://conecaonline.org/image/2007PDolJeffersonCD002cArW.jpg
Arrows point to clashed die marks on a 2007-P Jefferson dollar.

http://conecaonline.org/image/2007PDolJeffersonClashedDieLDSwAbrasionObvArW.jpg
Images © Ken Potter 2010
Arrows show the effects of abrasives used to remove clash marks (or other irregularities) from the die.

    September 23, 2010 -- Over the past several weeks I've written about clashed dies on Thomas Jefferson Presidential dollars in Numismatic News, which were submitted by several readers. Some collectors have been referring to the clash marks in the area of Miss Liberty's crown as the "extra ray" variety due to their appearance.  The crown (or tiara if you prefer) normally exhibits seven rays instead of what appears to be eight on these coins.
    The late Richard Imburgia is credited for being the fellow who sent me the first example I examined back in 2007. It is from the same dies as Rich Darby’s example sent to me several weeks ago shown in Photo #1. 
    Additionally, Imbrugia sent three other 2007-P Jefferson clashed die dollars from his collector friend Gerald Weakland of PA. While I found them all to be from different dies, most important was that two of Weakland's coins clearly demonstrated the effects of what the obverse and reverse clash marks looked like before the Mint caught them and what another pair of obverse and reverse dies looked like after they caught the aberrations and removed most of the marks from the reverse and all the marks from the obverse.
    Weakland also sent in a very similar clash that was perhaps a bit stronger in some areas than the Inbrugia/Darby specimens. We can see the clash marks within the area of the crown (Photo #2) and others running through Liberty’s outstretched right arm (not shown) in a very similar fashion to those on the Inbrugia/Darby specimens. On the obverse we see clash marks in the area of the eyes which are normally not found there (Photo #3). In a later die state example, (from what I believe to be a different die), the so-called “extra ray” has been greatly subdued (not shown) and on the obverse we see the Mint worked heavily within the area of the eyes with an abrasive to remove the clash marks (Photo #4). Note the series of parallel lines running through the recessed areas of the eyes.
    The logic for removing clash marks is that not only may they appear offense but more importantly because clashes can cause die cracking and if they are removed soon enough, extensive cracking may be able to be eliminated and the die’s life extended.
    Although interesting, the vast majority of clashed die varieties traditionally hold very little interest amongst collectors unless they are very unusual or strong. In the case of "Extra Ray" clashes only time will tell if they catch on to any significant degree.


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Buchanan 'Smooth Edge'

http://conecaonline.org/image/2010DolBuchananPlainEdgeW.jpg

    September 15, 2010 -- John Porter, a retired Navy veteran living in Port Charlotte, Florida, has found a James Buchanan Presidential dollar missing the edge inscription while searching Philadelphia rolls he obtained from a local bank. This is the second time in just a few weeks that 2010 United States Mint “golden dollars” have been found missing the edge inscription or what some call a “smooth edge.” The edge inscriptions intended for Presidential and Native American dollars since 2009 include the date, Mintmark, E PLURIBUS UNUM and thirteen stars. The first of the 2010 errors reported, (which of course were undated), were on 2010 Denver minted Native American dollars placed in government issued Mint Sets that I reported upon in my August 31 front page Numismatic News story. Read more on the coin and its possible rarity in upcoming stories in Coin World and Numismatic News.  More can also be seen here:  CoinZine

See The Numismatic News Story

See The Numismaster Version Of Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Wide AM 1c

http://conecaonline.org/image/2000-wide-am-.jpg
Photo courtesy of Lance Newman

    Sept 03, 2010 -- Lance Newman of Indiana reports finding a 2000 Lincoln cent in circulation with a Proof Style "Wide AM" reverse.  For those wanting to learn more about the differences between the Wide AM and Close AM Reverses I suggest visiting here:  http://www.varietyvista.com/Lincoln%20Cent%20RDV%20Changes.htm.  Nice find Lance!


In The News ...
Dropped Letter Found On Rim Of Polk $1

http://conecaonline.org/image/2009-PDolPolkDroppedTOnEdge-ViewAr500pxW.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/2009-PDolPolkDroppedTOnEdgeObvMicroAR500pxW.jpg

    August 28, 2010 -- A 2009-P James K. Polk Presidential dollar with dropped “T” letter on the edge has been found by John Morris of Florida.  The inverted “T” from either the word TRUST or PRESIDENT is only the second example of a dropped letter on the edge of a Presidential dollar that I have personally examined since the inception of the Presidential dollar series in 2007.
    A dropped letter” is a relatively rare error type with its origins in the common filled die error. When debris, (often referred to by error collectors as “mint goop” or “grease”), clog a die, it may after a few strikes, become compressed within specific cavities of the die such as numerals or letters even after the offending material has been removed from the fields of the die through the repetitive process of striking coins.

See The Rest Of The Numismaster Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Errors & Varieties Found In Change

http://conecaonline.org/image/199X1cCappedDieStrk.jpg
Images courtesy of Pete Acampora

    July 27, 2010 -- Frequent contributor, Pete Acampora sent in  photos of a neat find he made last week while searching through rolls. He said: "I thought it might be nice enough to make its way onto the CONECA website. I think it's called a "Struck Through Die Cap."  I was also told it could be a "Late Stage Brockage." In any event, I was tickled to find it. Thanks for all the great info you put out on varieties and errors. I'm hooked."
    I agree with his assessment that it is struck through a die cap or what is commonly referred to as a "Capped Die Strike."  Not a bad find!
    He also emailed us back a few days later with images or two more of his finds.  See them by clicking in the link below.

See More Of His Finds Here


Recent Finds ...
Another 1992 1c 'Close AM' Found!
Fourth Example Reported So Far

http://conecaonline.org/image/19921cCloseAMDavidStrzalkowskiSpecimenBJNeffImage.jpg
Image courtesy of BJ Neff

http://conecaonline.org/image/19921cCloseAMDavidStrzalkowskiSpecimenAndImageW.jpg
Image courtesy of David Strzalkowski
Seen here is the AM of AMERICA spaced close together.  Normally the M of AMERICA
is centered between the A and E for cents of this date from all Mints including proofs.

    July 14, 2010 -- CONECA member, BJ Neff reports that David Strzalkowski of Central Florida found a 1992 Lincoln cent with a 'Close AM' reverse (sometimes referred to as the 'Reverse of 1993').  This is only the fourth example reported to us so far with the third known specimen grading NGC AU-55 and selling at the Bowers & Merena January 2010 Orlando Rarities Sale on January 5th for  $4830. (Scroll down to see two more stories on this variety.)
   
The Strzalkowski specimen was encapsulated by PCGS at the summer F.U.N. show as AU-55. The full story can be found in Billy Crawford's August edition of Die Variety News, issue # 15. Congratulations to David on a very nice find!

See The Die Variety News Story Here


In The News ...
"Greasy Ghosts" Explored In Coin World

http://conecaonline.org/image/01a_greasy_ghost_1971S_1c_obv.jpg

http://conecaonline.org/image/01c_greasy_ghost_1971S_1c_obv2.jpg
Images courtesy of Mike Diamond

     July 10, 2010 -- In the July 5th Collector's Clearinghouse column, CONECA President Mike Diamond explores the little-known phenomenon of "greasy ghosts". "Grease" (a.k.a. die fill, mint goop) of the right consistency and viscosity will tend to migrate to areas of relatively low effective striking pressure. Many of these areas lie opposite large, centrally located, deeply recessed design elements like buildings and busts. The grease slowly accumulates and solidifies to form a solid, if vague, representation of the design element on the opposite die. It leaves an amorphous, incuse version of that design element on the coin.
    Seen here is a greasy ghost of Lincoln seen on the reverse face of a 1971-S cent. A considerable portion of the design on both faces has been muted or obscured by grease.

See The July 5 Coin World Story
(You must be a current CW Subscriber)

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Another Kind Of Ghosts Of Lincoln!

http://conecaonline.org/image/1947S1cGhostOfLincolnSubmittedByRobertPelletierW.jpg
Image © Ken Potter / Coin courtesy of Robert Pelletier
The upper two images show the coin from a normal perspective while the lowest image
shows the reverse inverted and horizontally flipped in Photoshop™ so that you
can see the"Ghost Of Lincoln" as it mimics the actual portrait.

     July 10, 2010 -- Since Mike Diamond did such a nice presentation on "Greasy Ghosts" (see above) I thought I'd take a look at another kind of "Ghost" that collectors run into from time to time.  Robert Pelletier sent in a 1947-S cent that I featured in Numismatic News back in January. His coin has an effect that occurred quite prominently during the Wheat-back cent era to a small percentage of these coins than at any other time on modern U.S. coinage. It’s sometimes referred to as a “Ghost of Lincoln” since you can see a strong outline of Lincoln’s bust upside down on the reverse. While weaker examples this variation are common on many denominations, strong ones are not nearly so. The variation does not seem to have ever caught on to any degree. While it was well-known by many error-variety collectors decades ago, it appears to be almost forgotten today. This might be because what we most commonly encounter today are Memorial cents where the effect does not show up to the same degree.  It also shows up to a greater or lesser degree on other denominations including foreign coins.
    The CONECA Glossary (derived largely from the works of Alan Herbert) says: “When a die nears the end of its usefulness, often it exhibits the major central design of its opposing mate. This design is transferred from one die to the other through the striking of the coin metal. Alan Herbert gives this illustration: “The best example I can offer of this phenomenon is the toy which you’ve all seen which has five or six metal balls hanging in a row, touching each other. When you pull back the end ball and allow it to strike the row, it causes the ball at the far end to swing away from its neighbor. The same thing occurs with design transfer, the outline of the design being transferred from one die to the other. This variety is fairly common on the early wheat cents. It is often called the “ghost of Lincoln. The technical term for this is IMPD (Internal Metal Displacement Phenomenon." KP


Members Share ...
1988-D Transitional Reverse Find
by Jeffrey Yost 

http://conecaonline.org/image/1988DRDV0062a(2)FG2.WilesPhotojpg.jpg
Image courtesy of James Wiles

   June 15, 2010 --  Hello fellow CONECA members!  I have been collecting error coins for the past five years. I started collecting coins about 35 years ago when a high school friend got me interested. I worked at a arcade and it just kills me now to think of all the odd, errors and weird coins I just passed on. I never thought they would be worth much!
    I recently  found one of the more rare coins in the Lincoln cent series. A 1988-D RDV-006. For those that don't know, this is the 1988-D cent  struck with a reverse presumably intended for 1989.  It was struck from the second of three reverse dies currently known for the Denver version of this variety. Six dies are known for the Philadelphia version.  I found it during a roll search in late December of 2009. The Variety Vista Website has some great information on this but in a nutshell this reverse shows Frank Gasparro's designer initials "flared" vs. the straighter FG found on a normal 1988 or 1988-D cent.  You can compare the normal 1988 reverse against the reverse  of 1989 (shown above) by going here: http://www.varietyvista.com/1988PRDV0061%20cent.htm.  
    James Wiles attributed it for me in Mid-February. Oh I knew what is was as soon as I saw it! I'd been searching years for this particular coin. I recently sent it to Heritage to get slabbed and graded. Once it is, I will let Ken Potter know so he can update the members as to how it turned out. I gotta find another one now! What a feeling to find something so rare!
    One item of note, I'd like to mention that when I sent this coin to Mr. Wiles, it got lost in the mail. All I did was put tracking on the package instead of registered mail. It got delivered to the wrong person and all the post office could tell me is that they delivered it but not to whom.  Needless to say I was somewhat distressed. Fortunately it did show up. My package was delivered to Mr. Wiles, opened, but intact.
    A special thanks to both James Wiles and Bob Piazza for their constant reassurance that it would show up. I was a mess  for what seemed like a long time, which turned out to be a week and a half (until it finally showed up). Also thank you for providing the photo used here as well James.
    Thank you to Ken Potter as well and all the other coin specialists who take the time and effort to publish and inform us with their knowledge.


Recent Finds ...
Where The Formative Years
Doubled Dies Are Found
by Tony Clement

http://conecaonline.org/image/2009P1cFYCONECADDR009Crawford009WAr.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2010
This one is listed by CONECA as DDR-009 (9-R-VIII) and was found in Mint supplied
Collector Rolls dated 4/23/09.  Your editor also found a very small number of them (three to be
precise) in a $25 bank box dated July 16, 2009 containing N.S. String & Sons red & white rolls.

    June 13, 2010 -- Starting in July of 2009 I starting sending reports to Ken Potter on where I was finding examples of the 2009-P Formative Years (Rail Splitter) Lincoln cents with doubled die obverses and reverses.  The reports continued for a number of months until Ken finally asked me if I could compile the entire list in chronological order based on the date and time stamped on the boxes of the two-roll sets sold by the Mint directly to collectors.  What is to follow is a compilation of those efforts, i.e., the date and time stamped on the box, the inspector's number, which doubled dies were found (often there was more than one variety in a roll) and their CONECA listing numbers followed by their Wexler numbers.  This information is presented below.

Rolls Sold Directly By The Mint To Collectors
(These rolls were specially packaged in commemorative wrappers and came
in a box with a roll or each from Philadelphia and Denver) 

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/16/09 9774 9:56 Doubled Dies Found: 8-R-VIII, 14-R-VIII (WDDR-012, WDDR-013)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/17/09 9883 12:23 Doubled Dies Found:1-O-VIII, 1-R-VIII, 2-R-VIII, 3-R-VIII (WDDO-001, WDDR-002, WDDR-001, WDDR-003)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/21/09 9883 12:12 Doubled Dies Found:10-R-VIII (WDDR-005)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/22/09 9774 13:49 Doubled Dies Found: 7-R-VIII (WDDR-008)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/23/09 9774 10:43 Doubled Dies Found: 9-R-VIII (WDDR-006)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/24/09 9774 7:38 Doubled Dies Found: 7-R-VIII, 10-R-VIII (WDDR-008, WDDR-005)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/27/09 9883 10:52 Doubled Dies Found:1-O-VIII, 1-R-VIII, 2-R-VIII, 3-R-VIII (WDDO-001, WDDR-002, WDDR-001, WDDR-003)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/28/09 9774 7:25 Doubled Dies Found: 1-O-VIII,1-R-VIII, (WDDO-001, WDDR-002)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/28/09 9774 12:50 Doubled Dies Found:10-R-VIII (WDDR-005)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/29/09 9774 9:42 Doubled Dies Found:10-R-VIII (WDDR-005)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/29/09 9883 12:14 Doubled Dies Found:1-O-VIII, 1-R-VIII, 2-R-VIII, 3-R-VIII, (WDDO-001, WDDR-002, WDDR-001 WDDR-003)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 4/29/09 9774 12:52 Doubled Dies Found:1-O-VIII, 1-R-VIII, 2-R-VIII, 3-R-VIII (WDDO-001 WDDR-002 WDDR-001 WDDR-003)

Date Stamped On Box: 4/30/09 9774 12:08 Doubled Dies Found: 4-R-VIII (WDDR-004)

Date Stamped On Box: 5/1/09 9774 8:47 Doubled Dies Found: 5-R-VIII, 8-R-VIII, 14-R-VIII (WDDR-011, WDDR-012, WDDR-013)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 5/6/09 9774 7:58 Doubled Dies Found:1-O-VIII , 1-R-VIII (WDDO-001, WDDR-002)

Date, Time & Inspector's # Stamped On Box: 5/29/09 9778 8:41 Doubled Dies Found: 25-R-VIII (WDDR-026)

Other Notes

Brinks Rolls Released One Month After The Ceremony/First Day Of Issue At Banks: 12-R-VIII (VCR#4/DDR#4) (WDDR-016)

Mixed Bank Rolls/First Day Of Release: 13-R-VIII, 16-R-VIII ,25-R-VIII (WDDR-017, WDDR-026, WDDR-028)

    I opened some rolls that I  purchased from American Precious Metals Exchange (APMEX). They were having a close out on most of their coins and these rolls came in red and white, and brown and red wrappers in which I found doubled dies. So far out of
eight rolls I have pulled around 80 varieties.

APMEX Supplied N.F. String Red & White Rolls: 26-R-VIII, 27-R-VIII (WDDR-025, WDDR-032)

APMEX Supplied Brown & Red Rolls: 15-R-VIII, 16-R-VIII (WDDR-027, WDDR-028)

Editors Note:  Both the author and I know this list is not complete.  It is simply what he was able to compile from what he had access to.  If any others have such information to share, please sent it to: conecawebmaster.


In The News ...
The Denver Mint Today

    June 12, 2010 -- While doing some research on the Internet I found an article penned by Leon Worden for the February 2006 issue of COINage Magazine (Vol. 42, No. 2).  If is a fully illustrated VIP tour of the Mint that is must reading for any serious student of the minting process.  

See His Article Here 


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds 2009 D NA $1
 w/ Weak Edge Lettering

http://conecaonline.org/image/2009DNADollWeakEdgeLetteringTonySavinoW.jpg
Image courtesy of Tony Savino

See the date by clicking on the image above

     June 12, 2010 -- Back in January (January 20th to be exact), collector Tony Savino reported finding a 2009-D Native American Dollar with Weak Edge Lettering.  This type of edge variation is caused by a maladjusted edge lettering machine.  We've seen examples that were run through a loosely adjusted edge lettering machine that barely showed a letter or two. On the other extreme we've found that when the Schuler edge lettering machine is adjusted too tight, it results in edge inscriptions and/or ornamentation that is extremely strong.  At times the adjustment is so tight that any irregularities showing on the shoulder of the edge lettering die (which is identified as a "segment" in a Shuler Edge Lettering Machine Manual that I have) will be present and the diameter of the coin itself may be reduced by the edge lettering machine.   These variations have been seen on all the Presidential and the Native American dollars with edge inscriptions.  Extreme examples in either direction appear to be collectable and of some value to collectors, though from what I can see the values seem to range widely depending on when and where one is sold and whether or not it has been graded and attributed as such by a third party grading service (and which service graded/attributed it). KP


In The News ...
Double Edge Lettering Look-Alikes

http://conecaonline.org/image/183650cRepeaterEdgebDominickLuckette500Px.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2010 / Coin courtesy of Dominick Luckette
Double edge inscription on an 1936 Bust half dollar.

    May, 24, 2010 -- With the introduction of the Presidential series of “golden dollars” in 2007 hobbyists were treated with what many thought were new error types on U.S. coinage.  Those errors included such variations as doubled edge lettering, missing edge lettering, slippage errors, etc.
    However, for those who collect early American coinage, such as Bust half-dollars (amongst others) such errors are old hat. The technology that created the earlier pieces and the sequence of events was a bit simplistic but the basics were nearly the same. Al Overton in United States Early Half Dollar Die Varieties 1794 – 1836 (now authored by Donald L. Parsley) lists 59 edge-lettering variations for the series.
   
The edge lettering of that era was created by running the planchet through a castaing machine (named after the inventor Jean Castaing), which Water Breen describes in his Complete Encyclopedia of US & Colonial Coins saying that it “imparted edge ornamentation and / or edge lettering to planchets before striking.  Mounted onto a bench were two parallel bars, each containing half the edge device, set apart minutely less than the blank’s diameter, one fixed, the other spring-mounted and set to move forward at the pull of a long handle.  Each blank passed through the machine, rolling enough to receive the complete edge device. In practice, slippage sometimes produced blundered edge inscriptions (parts missing or overlapping); more rarely a blank might be run through a second time.  The Mint personnel commonly called the operation ‘rounding and edge marking’.” "

http://conecaonline.org/image/Copyof2007PAdamsInvEdgeLettering500px.jpg
Image © Ken Potter 2007
A double edge inscription on a 2007-P Adams dollar created by a Schuler Edge Lettering Machine.

See The Rest Of The Article In The June 7 Issue Of Coin World
(Note:  you must be a current subscriber to CW to view this article online).
See An Sketch Of A Castaing Machine Here
See Gallery Mint Castaing Machine Dies And Punches Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds 1983-P 50c w/Double Clash

http://conecaonline.org/image/1983P50cDblDieClashfromAishaShahidA.jpg
Image courtesy of BJ Neff

    May 15, 2010 -- Collector Aisha Shahid reports finding a 1983-P Kennedy half-dollar with nice strong double clash marks most prominent on the obverse and some lesser clash marks on the reverse.  A die clash occurs when a planchet fails to enter into the striking chamber and the dies smash or clash into each other.  The result is that if the clashing is hard enough, outlines of the design and other aberrations will be impressed into one die or the other or both to varying degrees of strength.  The act of the dies clashing, can throw of the orientation of the dies a bit and if and when this occurs if a second clash occurs, it may be off set from the first clash as we see here.

See More Of The Photos & Overlays Here  


Members Share ...
Truckin' Cherrypicker Finds Rare
 1976-D DDO-001 Quarter!

by Lee C. Roschen
"The Truckin' Cherrypicker"

http://conecaonline.org/image/1976DDDO001bLofLIBERTY2.jpg
Image courtesy of James Wiles
Doubling of LIBERTY is very strong; shown above is the LI of LIBERTY.  

http://conecaonline.org/image/LeeRoschenW1976D25cDDO.jpg
Image courtesy of Lee Roschen
Lee Roschen holding his prized find.

    May 08, 20010 -- Dear fellow CONECA members, while on my trucking travels, I always set aside every 1976-D Bicentennial quarter in hopes of getting lucky in spotting the elusive and rare Doubled Die Obverse (FS-25-1976D-101 in the Cherrypickers’ Guide, URS-6,17-32 copies known in all grades). Although I have been looking for this variety ever since I bought my first copy of the Cherrypicker’s Guide (3rd Edition) in 1995, I never expected to find one. 
That all changed on Friday, January 15th, while I was waiting to get unloaded in South Dakota. A day earlier, I had stopped by a bank in Clayton, Wisconsin, hoping to score my usual $50.00 in half dollars to look through. They had none available, so I opted for $100.00 in quarters instead (What? You don't think I am going to take the time to park the truck and walk to and from a bank without obtaining some coin rolls through which to cherrypick, do you?).      

See The Rest Of The Article


Members Share ...
U.S. Mint Implicates Migrating Atoms in Improper Annealing Errors

By Mike Diamond

    March 17, 2010 -- For decades error collectors have puzzled over copper-nickel and Cu-Ni clad coins struck on planchets with a layer of copper on the surface. In times past, these errors were called "copper wash" and "sintered plating" errors. The 1962 nickel shown here is a typical example.
The copper wash hypothesis proposed that the planchets were being immersed in a chemical rinse saturated with copper ions. The copper ions were allegedly derived from previous batches of copper-alloy cents. The copper ions would attach themselves to the surface of the planchets, giving rise to the afore-mentioned copper veneer.

See Rest Of Story Here


1877/6 Overdate Discovered by Rick DeSanctis on 1877-CC
Type II F-107 and F-108 Liberty Seated Dime Varieties

by Gerry Fortin

    March 17, 2010 -- During March 2010, I received an email from Rich DeSanctis, at Ft Myers, Florida dealer while staying at the Baltimore Harbor Days Inn and preparing for the Baltimore show Top 100 Varieties display.  Rick’s email indicated that he had a mint state 1877-CC Type II F-108 Seated dime with date punch that was actually an overdate on an original 1876 die. A quick phone call to Rick ensued to investigate the possibility of a true overdate for the Liberty Seated dime denomination.    Upon reaching Rick, he confirmed locating the top loop and knob of a 6 digit on the top surface of the crossbar of the second 7 date digit consistent with the 1877, 7 Over 6 Liberty Seated Half Dollar listed in Cherrypickers' Guide as FS-50-1877-301. 

See Rest Of Story Here


In The News ...
Third Known 1992 'Close AM' Cent
Fetches Nearly $5000 in BM Auction


Image © Ken Potter / Coin courtesy of Kie Brown
This is a photo of the second specimen of the variety found that was graded by PCGS as MS62 RD last September

    January 09, 2010 -- The third known specimen of a 1992 'Close AM' cent that I reported upon a few weeks ago (scroll down to see the article)  has come up for auction and fetched $4830.  It was graded by NGC as AU-55 RB and was auctioned by Bowers & Merena in their January 2010 Orlando Rarities Sale Session One as Auction # 13260 on January 5th. 
   
Although this is the third specimen to come to light in recent years since the variety was first discovered in March 2006 by Parker Ogilvie, it is the first example to be put up for public sale. 

See Auction Details Here


In The News ...
Potpourri Of Errors & Varieties Featured


Image © Ken Potter / Coin courtesy of Robert Pelletier

    January 08, 2010 -- Of all the errors and varieties featured by Ken Potter last year in Numismatic News, arguably the most important, at least in terms of rarity and value, was a second known specimen of the elusive 1992 Philadelphia-Mint Lincoln cent struck with a “Close AM” (of AMERICA) design style reverse. This year I start out by informing readers that a third specimen has now been located.
    According to Potter "Back in the middle of September a Numismatic News reader from Connecticut sent me images of a specimen in an Numismatic Guaranty Corp. holder graded AU-55 RB. The variety, which has become almost mythological due to its rarity, is listed in Brian Allen and my book, Strike It Rich With Pocket Change, 2nd edition, (published by Krause Publications in 2008) with a possible value of $5,000 to $10,000+ for about uncirculated and uncirculated specimens, which I freely admit may be far lower than they are actually worth."
    Potter, also featured a number of other coins that came in during 2009 including a 2001 Silver Eagle with a fairly good size raised area on the obverse, a 'Ghost of Lincoln' cent, brockage errors and capped die strikes.  He also examined an altered quarter dollar and an underweight Washington quarter.  The complete story can be seen in the current issue of Numismatic News while a version stripped of most image can be seen at the below link.

See The Rest  Of Story


In The News ...
1971-S Proof Lincoln & 1921-S Morgan
Trail Dies Found

By BJ Neff - NLG

 http://conecaonline.org/image/1971S1cTrailDiebyBJNeff.jpg

    May 04, 2010 – A 1971 Proof Lincoln cent has been attributed with an obverse trail die. Dennis Mize of Arizona submitted the coin pictured below to www.traildies.com for analysis. The distortion seen on the BERT of LIBERTY was enough to convince me that this was in fact an obverse trail die. 

See The Rest Of Story


Members Share ...
Mike Diamond's Error-Variety Checklist Updated!

    December 04, 2009 -- Mike Diamond has released the latest update of his comprehensive Error-Variety Checklist.  It can be located in the Error-Variety Article Index.  Here is the direct link: http://hermes.csd.net/~coneca/content/ErrorChecklist.pdf.
    Shown above is a coin from that Diamond says falls into "weak strikes" category. "Is a double-struck, indented dime in which the second strike was weak as a result of insufficient die approximation. The area beneath the indent is well-struck because the intrusive planchet took up the extra space between the dies" according to Diamond.  Images by Mike Diamond.


In The News ...
1852 Seated Liberty Dime Cud Featured!


Image courtesy of The E-Journal

    December 01, 2009 -- In the 2009 Volume 5, Issue 12 of The E-Journal, the The Electronic Newsletter of the LIBERTY SEATED COLLECTORS CLUB, features an 1852 Liberty Seated Dime with a Major Die Break (Cud) running from the rim and encroaching into the lower portion of the date.  Jason Feldman sent in this image and and early die state with a pre-cud die crack showing the die progression of this variety.  It was on of a number of intereting stories featured in this issue.  Editor, Bill Bugert, stated that all past issues of E-Gobrecht may be accessed from Jerry Fortin's Liberty Seated Dime website at:  http://www.seateddimevarieties.com/LSCC.htm.  The current issue and/or future issues of E-Gobrecht, can be received free of charge by simply requesting to be put on the mailing list by sending Bugert an email at:  wb8cpy@earthlink.net.
    LSCC also publishes the Gobrecht Journal.   It is official printed periodical of the club, contains different material than the E-Gobrecht, and is available to the members only. Annual membership dues for the LSSC are a very reasonable $20. Individuals interested in joining can correspond directly with the club's president at: John McCloskey, President LSCC, 5718 King Arthur Drive, Kettering, Ohio 45429. He can also be reached by e-mail at John.McCloskey@notes.udayton.edu. More information on the club can be found here: http://www.lsccweb.org


Members Share ...
Super 2007-P Split Die Dime Featured!

    November 01, 2009 -- Brett Sherris of Northport, NY wrote to say: "I just picked up this coin from Key Numismatic, and since it was a 2007, I thought it might be of interest to you. I guess you could consider this a severely shattered die, or one of the largest retained CUDs you ever seen. If you examine this coin lengthwise, the entire bottom half of the coin is elevated along the die crack line."  Nice error!!!


In The News ...
Liberty Seated Dime Varieties Web-book
Now Open For Public Reference


Images courtesy of Gerry Fortin
1875-S Dime With Retained Reverse Cuds

    November 01, 2009 -- Gerry Fortin is pleased to announce that his Liberty Seated Dime varieties web-book at www.seateddimevarieties.com has been converted from a subscription scheme to fully open to numismatic community access. The website and web-book entitled, "The definitive resource for Liberty Seated Dime variety collectors" provides a comprehensive analysis of individual dates and their respective obverse and reverse dies, die marriages and important die states. In addition, Gerry provides rarity assessments for each variety and suggested premiums. Throughout the web-book, varieties are cross-referenced to Kamal Ahwash's, "Encyclopedia of United States - Liberty Seated Dimes - 1837-1891" and Brian Greer's, "The Complete Guide to Liberty Seated Dimes."
    To enhance the Seated Dime variety collector's website experience, Fortin offers collecting objectives for the advanced specialist including a Top 100 Varieties set, a Top 25 Shattered Dies set and recently, a Top 25 Cud Dies set. Each set is well defined with supporting pictorials and linked individual descriptions for each variety. Other website features include a pictorial guide for each date in the Liberty Seated Dime series as a quick variety reference without having to navigate the extensive content of the web-book. An open registry is also available for seated half dimes through half dollars. Both raw and certified coins can be listed in the open registry. Finally, he recently added a Historical Collections module, which attempts to locate and document the provenance of Seated dimes, contained within the Eliasberg, Ahwash and Greer collections.
    Since his reference collection is significant and constantly being upgraded, a For Sale list is also presented to readers for passing along duplicates to serious collectors of the series. Fortin works closely with specialists towards guiding the construction of their sets and featuring their accomplishments in the open registry website module.
    Fortin has been collecting and researching Liberty Seated dimes exclusively since 1987 and published the www.seateddimevarieties.com web-book in August 2004. He publishes frequently in the E-Gobrecht and Gobrecht Journal, both publications of the Liberty Seated Collector Club. His PCGS registry sets have won numerous awards including Best Classic Set in 2007-2009. He will be exhibiting the PCGS registry set at the November 2009 Whitman Baltimore show as part of a Liberty Seated Collector Club display.


In The News ...
Second 1992 Close AM Reverse Specimen Appears!


Image © Ken Potter / Coin courtesy of Kie Brown

    September 19, 2009 -- According to lead stories appearing in the current issue of Numismatic News and the September 7 issue of Coin World, a second known specimen of the elusive 1992 Philadelphia minted Lincoln cent struck with a "Close AM" (of AMERICA) design style reverse has been reported. Kie Brown of Gales Ferry, Conn., found it while searching circulated rolls of Lincoln cents on July 24.  According to Potter, the variety, which had almost become mythological due to its rarity, is listed in Brian Allen and his book, Strike It Rich With Pocket Change, second edition (published by Krause Publications earlier this year) with a possible value of $10,000+ for an uncirculated specimen and freely admits that this may be far lower than its actual worth.

Coin World Subscribers May See The Story  Here

See The Online Version Of The Numismatic News Story Here

See The Numismaster Version Of The Story Here

Third 1992 Close AM Reverse Specimen Appears!

Note:  Since the above articles were published it has been confirmed that the Kie Brown specimen has been graded by PCGS as MS-62 Red; I have also learned (via images) that NGC has graded one as AU-55 RB for collector Bruce Jaeger on September 16 or 17.  This would now be the third example known and the second one known to be certified.  


In The News ...
2001-P Convex Reverse JFK Halves Examined



Photos © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin Courtesy of Pepe DeMeo

    September 14, 2009 -- According to a story in Numismatic News, Pepe DeMeo of New York sent in a 2001-P Kennedy half dollar with some very interesting effects. While a normal coin has basined (concave) fields, the reverse of his coin is convex, somewhat like many brass buttons.
    A normal concave effect allows the central design to be raised up from the recess to gain relief and still be lower than the rims to protect the designs from undue wear and to facilitate the stackability of the coins.
    On DeMeo's coin, the area where it slopes down toward the rim the fastest begins at the circle of stars, though the field seems to actually begin its decent towards the rim much closer to center. Many of the stars that encircle the central design are connected by die stress cracks.
    As a result of the convexity, the coin does not lie flat on the reverse rim but instead teeters on the uneven high points of the design, upon which it could actually be spun like a top.

See The Rest Of Story

See Large Detailed Images Here

Note: Another story on one of these coins owned by CONECA member, Curt Stahl was published by CONECA president Mike Diamond in the Sept/Oct 2008, pp. 5-9 Errorscope.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
1000th Trail Die Reported!

    June 27, 2009 – Traildies.com has added its 1000th die to the site. The 1994 Lincoln cent was found by CONECA member Louis Schaeffer and is now listed as 1994P-1DEO-008T. The site has had 11, 800 visitors since it beginning in August of 2008, which is a positive indicator on the popularity of this relatively new die variety. The producers of the site, CONECA Board of Directors Bob Piazza and Membership Chairman BJ Neff invite you to stop on by and take a look. You may find it very interesting.


Members Share ...
Another Rail Splitter Doubled Die Reported!


Photo courtesy of BJ Neff

    June 25, 2009 -- According to BJ Neff, "CONECA member Jeremy Gardner of Kentucky has found a different type of 2009 Formative Years Lincoln cent doubled die. This one does not show any doubling of the fingers; however, it does show a distinct doubling of the book's spine and upper edge. This die does not yet have a filing number assigned in any system yet, but I am sure it will soon. Congratulations Jason on a very nice find!"


Members Share ...
1999 Wide AM Cent Found at Disney World!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007

    June 16, 2009 - While attending the Central Florida Coin Club meeting, CONECA Membership Chairman, BJ Neff was able to attribute a 1999 Wide AM (Type II Reverse) Lincoln cent for CONECA member Marcia Taylor of Florida. She is an avid pocket change searcher and believes that this find came from the Disney World complex in Orlando. Congratulations on a nice find Marcia!


In The News ...
Formative Years Cents Yielding Double Dies!


Click On Image To See Enlarged View
Photo © Ken Potter 2009/Coin Courtesy of John Horengic

      June 13, 2009 -- John Horengic of Maryland was the first collector to report to me one of the new Formative Years commemorative Lincoln cents with a doubled-die reverse, and I am now aware of several more different ones.  Two others shown in this article are from Bob Piazza of coppercoins.com.
     In typical fashion, as are most doubled dies found dated since the late 1990s, the three exhibit a centralized type of doubling restricted to designs in or near the center of the coin. KP

See The Rest Of The Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
Truckin' Cherrypicker Finds 3-Legged Buffalo

by Lee C. Roschen
"The Truckin' Cherrypicker"


Lee Roschen holds his thumb just below the unexpected 1937-D Three-Legged Buffalo Nicklel found in this collection.

     June 08, 2009 -- I had to pass on my latest coin finds! A few months ago on my trucking travels, I stopped at a small town bank here in Minnesota ...one I had never stopped at before. In five rolls of half dollars, I found 31 silver and silver clads, including two 1964's. Not bad! So I badly wanted to stop at that very same bank as soon as possible again and did so a bit over a month ago. This time I plunked down $160 for sixteen rolls. I figured this time I would score maybe 80-90 silver halves, but ended up with only 28. However, this time the keepers included a 1954-D Franklin, a 1942 Walker, two 1964's, and the rest were 40% silver-clads. But that doesn't compare with what I came up with on Saturday morning 4-25-2009.
    I stopped at an antique store west of Minneapolis, and after looking more closely at some partially filled Whitman coin folders, purchased a Buffalo nickel folder with 43 Buffalo nickels in it for $75.00.
    About a half dozen didn't even have visible dates. This was one of the types of folders that has the clear plastic inserts that enables one to clearly see both the reverse and obverse sides of the nickels. I noticed toward the end of the folder that it had two (2) slots for 1937-D nickels ...one for the normal copy, and one for the rare 3-legged nickel. Both slots had a 1937 nickel in them, and I expected to find a filler coin in the 3-legged nickel slot being that the person who originally put this set together inserted dateless Buffalo nickels as I mentioned earlier. I was stunned when I spotted with the naked eye that the coin that was in the 1937-D 3-legged nickel slot was indeed just that!
    I immediately closed the folder, and calmly said to the clerk "yeah, I'll buy this one." In my opinion the coin grades VF-20. I have never had such an easy cherrypick as this one, and never one such as sweet.
    This folder also included a few nicer grade semi-key nickels, including a 1937-D with an RPM east in EF-45, a 1923-P in EF-40, a 1927-S in EF-40, a 1927-D in VF-20, and a 1926-S in Good-4. Needless to say, I will be stopping by this place again in the future to see what other good stuff has been overlooked behind the glass display case. Ironically, I had just talked with Cherrypickers' Guide co-author J.T. Stanton earlier that morning for the first time in several years. I had to call him back a short while later to inform him of my find as I know he like hearing about that kind of thing.
    These are the latest finds from my trucking travels.


Members Share ...
1961 Franklin Half Sports Strike -Thru Error


Photos © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Bob Kehn

    June 08, 2009 -- Bob Kehn of MT sent in a 1961 Franklin Half dollar that is struck through grease and possibly other contaminants on the obverse and reverse.  Debris, (which can build up around machinery), made up of grease, oil, metal filings, etc., may work itself into and cover the dies.  When this occurs it can fill certain areas of design and prevent those areas from being struck up on the coin.
    On his coin we see that the entire word WE is missing due to the die being filled with Mint goop on the obverse while the O and portion of the F of OF are missing from the reverse (not shown).
    This is a relatively common error type that in recent years has become more of a nuisance than a collectable for miner examples as the Mint seems to be paying more attention to striking larger quantities of coins and less attention to cleaning up the dies today that in yesteryear.  While not considered a particularly major error when covering limited areas like this, on a Franklin Half, it is a welcome error that adds some moderate value to the coin.


Readers Share ...
1858-O Seated Liberty 50c Misplaced Date Found


Photos © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Richard DeKrauze
Click Image For Enlarged View

    June 06, 2009 -- Richard DeKrauze of Arizona sent in an 1858-O Seated Liberty half-dollar noting that it displayed some doubling of the date.   His question was, “is it a new variety?”  In actuality, it is not a new variety but is nonetheless an interesting one worth taking a closer look at since it not only shows a Repunched Date on at least three of the digits but also misplace portions of the same elements up into the lower Seated Liberty motif above.
    The misplaced portions of the date show as the base of the 1 in the rock above, the lower loop of an 8 in the rock up between the 58 and another portion of an 8 in the rock to the right of the second main 8.  There is also a nice RPD showing as the upper serif of the 1 down to the south and the last 8 as an 8/8/8.  I see nothing on the 5.  Kevin Flynn lists it in his book, A Collectors Guide To Misplaced Dates as MPD-006. He also cross-references it to WB-103 (its listing number in The Complete Guide to Liberty Seated Half Dollars by Bill Bugert and Randy Wiley).


Readers Share ...
Severely Deteriorating Dies Found


Photos © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Douglas Brown

    June 06, 2009 -- Douglas Brown of Virginia sent in a 2009-P District of Columbia quarter that shows heavy die deterioration doubling on the lettering around the obverse rim. It is strongest on UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. There are die breaks on Washington's forehead and a crack above the eye.
    The reverse is also very heavily deteriorated with many die chips and breaks especially throughout the date, UNUM and letters above. Additional die chipping is seen on the piano keys and areas below furthest to the right.
    Die chips and breaks like this are considered minor and specialists essentially ignore die deterioration doubling as inherent to late die state coins. Nonetheless, coins with as many die breaks and die chips as this one are fun to find and collect even if their values are nominal.


In The News ...
Reader Finds Neat VAM Variety


Photo © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Dave Stiebe

     June 02, 2009 -- Dave Stiebe of Michigan sent in a neat die break on a 1922 Peace dollar that is affectionately known by collectors as the ‘Extra Hair’ variety.  It is the later die state of VAM 2C as listed in the Comprehensive Catalog and Encyclopedia of Morgan & Peace Dollars by Leroy Van Allen and A. George Mallis.
    In the earlier stages the crack is a thin sliver of raised metal visible in Miss Liberty’s hair but by the time it gets to the stage shown here the fissure has widened dramatically and lengthened.  There are also notable die cracks present running from the “V” of Liberty’s bust to the O of GOD and from the back of Liberty’s lower bust up through the T of TRUST to the lowest curl of hair.
    According to Jeff Oxman and Dr. David Close, coauthors of The Official Guide To The Top 50 Peace Dollar Varieties, “The ‘Extra Hair’ variety is often overlooked by non-variety collectors, because at first glance the die break seems to be a part of the coin’s design.”  It appears that this was the case with this coin as Stiebe found it in his father’s collection unattributed for the variety.  VAM variety specialist Michael S. Fey said of the coin “The 1922 VAM 2C is a nice die break variety that currently brings only $75-85 in XF/AU condition.  That's very reasonable given its "Wow Factor!,” eye appeal, and rarity.”


In The News ...
More 2009-P DC Quarter DDs Found
by Ken Potter - NLG


Photo © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Rick LaJoie

June 02, 2009 -- In the May 19 issue of NN I reported on one very strong doubled die reverse for the Denver version of the 2009 District of Columbia quarter and three 2009-P doubled die reverses that ranged from moderately strong to minor.  I predicted that more varieties would be found and such has been the case but only for Philadelphia.  Rick LaJoie of New Hampshire has spotted three new varieties on the 2009-P DC quarter while another one of our readers has spotted a doubled die obverse on the Okalahoma State quarter.
    
LaJoie’s finds start with a fairly strong doubled die reverse that s
hows a secondary black key between the two normal black keys to the right of Ellington’s left arm.

See The Rest Of His Finds Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions


In The News ...
2009-D
DC Quarter DDR Sees Commercial Interest


Photo © Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Lee Maples
Here is the photo of Lee Maples' 2009-D DDR reported April 1

    May 12, 2009 -- According to a story in the May 12 issue of Numismatic News, A 2009-D District of Columbia quarter has turned out to be one of the most prominent of the centralized doubled dies seen in recent years. It boasts very strong doubling of ELL of Duke Ellington's last name, some doubling of the piano keys and panel below. All these elements were shifted diagonally to the southeast of the normal design with very wide separation.
    Prominent hobbyists like what they see of it so far. It has the makings of a commercial winner if a sizable number can be found.  A number of experts in the field who have some knowledge of the commercial market for doubled dies were interviewed and their comments noted in the story.

See The Numismaster Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


   In The News ...
Third Philly DC Quarter Overlooked


Photo ©  Ken Potter 2009 / Coin Courtesy of Charles Cataldo Jr

A notable doubled die that shows doubling of Duke Ellington’s right sleeve.

    May 12, 2009 -- In the May 18 issue of Coin World, author, Ken Potter takes a closer look at a 2009-D District of Columbia quarter doubled die reverse and notes that he added a third 2009-P DC doubled die variety to his listings since his earlier article on the subject that appeared in the May 4 issue of CW.  He noted that the third Philadelphia doubled die had come in with the same group as the other two Philadelphia issues but that he overlooked it in the mailer until he shook it a week later to make sure there was nothing more in it.


In The News ...
1995 Wide AM Rev Cent Appears Altered
Text by Ken Potter
Images by Chuck
Daughtrey


Here we see the rotational alignment that this reverse has as compared to the obverse.


This Wide AM is of a type showing diagnostics appropriate to the 1980s.


Here you can clearly see the seam where the reverse was fit into the obverse shell.

    February 04, 2009 (Updated April 27, 2009) -- Privately, many hobby observers knew it was just a matter of time before Lincoln cents altered to bear different reverse design styles appeared in circulation.  One such suspect coin appeared on on the www.coincommunity.com website late yesterday evening.  The poster showed images of a 1995 Lincoln cent that bore a Wide AM reverse along with a widely rotated reverse.  If it was a legitimate coin, it would have represented a new variety!
    However, the problem is that the coin exhibits the diagnostic seam between field of the coin and the rim that shows on many "novelty coins" that have been created by lathing the inside of one coin out into a shell and lathing another coin to reduce its thickness and circumference to a size to fit neatly but snuggly into the shell.
    The process is most exacting and difficult to detect unless one knows where to look and is often used to create double headed or double tailed novelty coins, which are sold by novelty outlets and magic shops.
   
The process is also used to create dual-denomination or dual-country coins where a Kennedy half dollar (for example) might have what appears to be a normal reverse (though most often widely rotated out of proper position with the obverse) but when held in ones forefingers and thumb and jolted against one's knee results in the inlaid section of the coin falling out and revealing a large Mexican 20 Centavos or a British Large penny (of the eras when these coins were copper and of about the size of a Kennedy half dollar) being on the flip side of the reverse inlay.  In fact, over the years whenever somebody at a show hands me a Kennedy half dollar with a rotated reverse, the first thing I do look for the seam and if present, jolt the reverse out of the shell as described above and then like magic hand the bedazzled owner back his coin in two pieces, one showing the Kennedy obverse and the other the foreign coin that was hidden within.  Obviously, when the owner fits the two parts of the coin back together it is most often done without regard to the obverse/reverse orientation resulting in the reverse appearing to be rotated out of proper position.  In spite of being made of two pieces, (a obverse shell and a reverse inlay), these concoctions normally fit together rather snugly and often take several tries to jolt apart.  
    In recent years Lincoln cents with Roosevelt dime reverses have also been reported but none have been sent for exam allowing me to deduce if they were made in the same manner but I have suspected that at least some were.
    Interestingly, the 1995 cent on the coincommunity.com website not only exhibits a rotated die, (suggesting that it might be one of these dual-denomination concoctions), but a Wide AM reverse design style that hasn't been used by the Mints since the 1980s. 
   
Chuck Daughtrey of coppercoins.com, who was one of the posters on the forum said: "The reverse design on this coin is not the typical Wide-AM as was used on proofs that year ... like all of the other mismatched reverse coins, which are of the proof design for that year. This design most closely matches the design abandoned after 1985. The shape of the letters is not right for any coin minted during the 1990s. Given the seam, the rotation, the very incorrect design, and the fact that this is the only example known, I am relatively certain this one was manufactured from two separate coins."
    So what insiders have been fearing might happen for years, appears to have finally come true!  See the suspect coin here:  http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=42000 
    Updated: April 27, 2009 -- At this point in time both Chuck
Daughtrey and I have examined the coin and confirmed that it is an alteration made from two different coins joined together as described above.


In The News ...
Denver & Philly DC Quarters Boast Doubled Dies!


Photo courtesy of Lee Maples
Here is the photo of Lee Maples' 2009-D DDR reported April 1


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter
Charles Cataldo Jr. supplied this and the coin below showing nice DDRs for the Philly issue.


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter

    April 20, 2009 --  If early reports are any indication, it appears that the District of Columbia Quarters for this year may turn out to be a treasure trove of doubled die finds on both the Philadelphia and Denver minted coins.
    Though the finds began as early as March 2 for the Philadelphia issue we will focus on the Denver find first since it is the most major.
    
On April 1, Lee Maples of Texas, who goes by the handle CAM40 on the Collector’s Universe Message Boards, reported to the U.S. Coin Forum that he had found what he though was a doubled die reverse on a 2009 District of Columbia Quarter which he later revealed to be a Denver issue.
    What he showed was what appears from the images provided, to be one of the most prominent of the centralized doubled dies seen in recent years, boasting very strong doubling of the ELL of ELLINGTON, some doubling of the piano keys just below and the lower edge of the piano below the keys. All these elements were shifted diagonally to the SE of the normal design with very wide separation.
    Charles Cataldo Jr. of Alabama Coin & Silver, Huntsville, AL reported that he found three different doubled die reverses on 2009-P District of Columbia quarters (two of them are shown here and in the current issue of Coin World and the third one will be shown next week).
    The first one shows a strong secondary black key centered between the two normal black keys to the right of Ellington’s left arm in addition to a bit of doubling to the lower left of the E of ELLINGTON.
    Cataldo’s second variety shows doubling restricted to the lower left of the E of ELLINGTON.
    More information on how these varieties were created, etc., can be found in the May 4 issue of Coin World.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Wexler Weighs In On 1956-D&S Cent


Image courtesy of John Wexler
Here we see what appears to be a nearly complete S below the 19 of date.
CONECA does not list it while most all other attributers do.

      April 15, 2009 -- CONECA member, John Wexler's latest installment of the Varieties Notebook column appearing in the April 20 issue of Coin World shows an example of the 1956-D cent that he lists as WDMM-001 that was sent in to him by CW reader Hartley Cole. He notes that it is an earlier die state that caused "a ripple of excitement because it shows nearly the complete outline of the S Mintmark." He notes further that others such as Billy Crawford and Ken Potter have it listed as a dual Mint mark variety."  Wexler also shows a 2008-D New Mexico quarter with a doubled die reverse within the lower second ray of the Zia sun symbol found in an Uncirculated set and a 2005-S Oregon proof silver quarter with a doubled die on the right underside of Wizard Island.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
Diamond's eBay "Eye Candy" Cherrypick!


Images courtesy of Mike Diamond
Click on Image For Expanded View

    March 29, 2009 -- CONECA president, Mike Diamond sent images in of a neat error saying: "I recently acquired this double-struck 1966 cent for a modest $62 on eBay.  The second strike is off-center and weak.  The jumble of first- and second-strike design elements is quite eye-catching.  I can't find any die markers, so I can't tell if the second strike was delivered by the same die." 


In The News ...
PCGS Grades First Native American $1 Coin
Missing Edge Lettering


    March, 28, 2009 -- According to a PCGS website article by Jaime Hernandez, on March 6, 2009, PCGS received the first reported and only-known Native American dollar with the edge lettering missing.
    PCGS Authorized Dealer and error coin expert Fred Weinberg submitted the coin to PCGS. According to Mr. Weinberg, "this is the same coin that was submitted to Coin World for a press release. So far, just this one Native American coin with missing edge lettering has been found, but I wouldn't be surprised if a few more showed up. The 2009 Native American coins have not been available through banks or normal commerce, so obtaining these coins has been challenging."

See The Rest Of Story


Recent Finds ...
Washington $1 Found w/Rotated Reverse
by BJ Neff

    March 28, 2009 -- The Central Florida Coin show had a few surprises surface and one of them was the finding of a Washington Dollar coin with a die rotation of 60 degrees. Rick O. of Orlando was searching old rolls that he had bought when the Washington Dollar coin first came to Florida when he made this discovery. So far he has found two of these Mint Errors.
    Randy Campbell, CONECA life member and senior grader for ICG confirmed the die rotation. Rick, with the advice from both Randy and me, had the one that he brought to the show encapsulated. Congratulations to Rick on a very nice find!


In The News ...
DGS Slabs Cache of "Smoking Liberty" 25c


Images courtesy of Dominion Grading Service

    March 20, 2009 -- Virginia Beach, VA. - In July of 2008 Ken Potter wrote an extensive and lavishly illustrated article reporting on the discovery of a most interesting and eye catching die variety found on an 1857 Liberty Seated Quarter dollar. It has since been embraced by the numismatic community and dubbed the "Smoking Liberty" variety. Potter reported the variety was first spotted by collector John O'Hare who showed it to friend and fellow collector, Saverio Barbieri, in the early part of 2000. So smitten by the variety was Barbieri he began an eight-year search for more specimens. After searching an estimated 30,000+ Liberty Seated quarters of that date on eBay and shows across the country Barbieri found a total of 28 specimens bringing the known population to 29 pieces.  O'Hare still has his "discovery piece" he first shared with Barbieri.
    Since publication of the seemingly rare die variety Mike Ellis, senior grader and variety specialist at Dominion Grading Service (DGS) in Virginia Beach, Virginia, found one in a client's submission which was encapsulated by DGS as a lightly cleaned AU55 making it the first "Smoking Liberty" encapsulated as such. It brought the number of known, slabbed examples to three, the first two being unattributed examples in NGC MS-64 and NGC MS-61. Both NGC and ANACS have since declined to attribute the coin in their holders, citing the new variety as being too much of an unknown. This is a common reaction to new varieties submitted to major grading services as they opt for more information to come to light before proceeding.
    Barbieri asked PCGS, NGC, ANACS and ICG at the recently concluded FUN show in Orlando, Florida again if they were ready to attribute this really fun variety on the holder. Again they reported they were not yet ready to do so. Finally, Barbieri approached DGS senior grader and well known variety specialist, Mike Ellis, if DGS was willing to attribute the coin as the "Smoking Liberty" variety. Having seen and attributed one already at DGS, Ellis examined all 28 of Barbieri's specimens agreeing to place the attribution on the holder for the raw specimens submitted. Ellis says he has seen 29 different specimens, fully agrees it is a significant variety and, agrees the coin needs to be attributed by some name until the organizations with the authority to assign actual numbers to the variety do so.  This way others who may have found examples can get them attributed in a way that the variety is identifiable by collectors and would-be sellers alike.
    At that time Barbieri submitted all 26 of his raw specimens to DGS for attribution, grading and encapsulation. Using DGS' pedigree option all 26 specimens are now known as the "Barbieri Cache." 
    Some of the coins have been consigned for placement in an upcoming sale by DLRC Auctions and Barbieri says he will not be offering any of the others until after these are sold so that some kind of market can be established. For details on when these coins will be offered by DLRC Auctions send an email request to coingroup@davidlawrence.com.  

Submitted by Dominion Grading Service

See The CONECA Story Here


Members Share ...
Chinese Fake Errors Turn Up at CFCS


Image courtesy of B.J. Neff
Here is one of the fake errors that showed up at the SCCS.

    March 18, 2009 -- According to CONECA Membership Chairman, B.J. Neff,  a large number of forgeries turned up at the Central Florida Coin Show. There were two distinct groups, one of U.S. Large  Cents and the other consisting of error coins.  He stated that they were easily detected as forgeries but that it was still alarming to see their presence. The full story, with images of  many of the fakes will be in the next Errorscope for all members to see!  Watch for it! 


Members Share ...
Trail Die Reported on New 2009 Cent!  

    February 28, 2009 -- According to B.J. Neff, "Trails" have been found on the new Lincoln cent affecting the reverse on the word STATES and part of UNITED. "While it is a minor die, it is unusual in the fact that it has dual directional trails at 090 and 270 degrees. This die is now listed on www.traildies.com as 2009P-1DER-001T" said Neff.  He also noted that this is the first "trail die" for 2009.  CONECA member, Jason Dick submitted the coin which is on the Log Cabin reverse type.


 

Recent Finds ...
Abigail Adams First Spouse 'Mule' Error Found!


A mock up of the mule is shown above created from US Mint images.
All of the mules reported to me so far were from the four-piece sets as shown above.


Here is a look at the normal Abigail Adams medal die pairing ...


... and a look at the normal Louisa Adams medal obverse and revere.

   February 02, 2009 -- On January 31, Michael Descamps, wrote to say that he purchased a 2007 First Spouse set of bronze medals from eBay in which he later found an Abigail Adams medal with a reverse appropriate to the Louisa Adams medal.  Abigail was the wife of our second president, John Adams.  The medal honoring her was first released in 2007 within four-piece sets packaged as shown above and as single medals.  Louisa was the wife of our sixth president, John Quincy Adams (who was the son of John Adams), and her metal was released in 2008 also in sets or as single medals.  
    In the meantime, Coin World has reported that at least three of the mules have come to light in the past three weeks and published a story on them by Paul Gilkes in the current (February 16) issue of Coin World that went online today (and was also mailed to readers of the printed version today).  All that were reported to Coin World were found in government issued "Four-Medal-Sets" that were offered during the U.S. Mints clearance sale that they dubbed the "Last Chance Sale" that began on Saturday November 15 and ended on December 19. 
    A ‘mule’ is a coin, medal or token that has been struck with dies that were not intended to be paired together.  
    This will be the second mule reported on an official Mint medal in the past several years. In a feature article written by Gilkes in the January 30, 2006 issue of Coin World, Dr. Walter Chinoy was credited with finding a Rutherford B. Hayes medal bearing a reverse die intended for the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential medal.  Later, Bill Fagan of Pennsylvania reported another example that was featured in my March 31 Coin World story last year.  Another version of that story can be found in Sept/Oct 2008 issue of Errorscope.  It can be seen here: http://hermes.csd.net/~coneca/content/HayesGrantmule.pdf  I'll update the Adams story with images of Descamps' medal as soon as I can.  A more in-depth report will be published in Numismatic News.  KP


In The News ...
Liberty Seated Collectors Club e-Newsletter
Features Top 25 Shattered Die Dimes


Image courtesy of LSCC/Gerry Fortin

    January 31, 2009 --  An article entitled Top 25 Liberty Seated Dime Shattered Dies by Liberty Seated Collectors Club (LSCC) member, Gerry Fortin is one of a number of features in the January  issue of The E-Gobrecht, (the electronic newsletter of the LSCC). In it he shows photos of all 25 varieties and explains the diagnostics that need to be present for a variety to qualify.
    According to Fortin, "Shattered dies by their nature result from a progressive degradation of working dies due to striking force stress. Many of the set entries feature different and progressive die states whereby the dies disintegrate. I expect that collectors will question the die state requirements for a dime with shattered die attributes to be acceptable for inclusion in the Top 25 set. For clarity on this point, each listing will have an explanation for its cracked die attributes that must be visible for inclusion into the set. Specific requirements are stated for each Top 25 listing to ensure that collectors understand the basic die state thresholds for inclusion of their coins into the set."
   
Editor, Bill Bugert, stated that all past issues of E-Gobrecht may be accessed from Fortin's Liberty Seated Dime website at:  http://www.seateddimevarieties.com/LSCC.htm.  The current issue and/or future issues of E-Gobrecht, can be received free of charge by simply requesting to be put on the mailing list by sending Bugert an email at:  wb8cpy@earthlink.net.
    LSCC also publishes the Gobrecht Journal.   It is official printed periodical of the club, contains different material than the E-Gobrecht, and is available to the members only. Annual membership dues for the LSSC are a very reasonable $20. Individuals interested in joining can correspond directly with the club's president at: John McCloskey, President LSCC, 5718 King Arthur Drive, Kettering, Ohio 45429. He can also be reached by e-mail at John.McCloskey@notes.udayton.edu. More information on the club can be found here: http://www.lsccweb.org.  


Recent Finds ...
Mysterious Re-Engraving of
1938 Proof Nickel Dies More
Extensive Than Previously
Believed

by Tom DeLorey - ANA LM-1696


Photo © Ken Potter 2008
This variety designated as Variety 3 by DeLorey exhibits a re-engraved ribbon.

    January 29, 2008 -- The unexplained re-engraving at the Philadelphia Mint of an obverse and reverse pair of 1938 Proof Jefferson nickel dies, as previously revealed by Michael Fey in a press release sent to the numismatic press in June of 2008, is not unique after all. At least five different1938 Proof nickel obverse dies were enhanced by an engraver who hand carved details directly into proof working dies, and it remains to be seen if ANY 1938 Proof nickel dies have the elusive “normal” design.

See The Rest Of Story

Note: CONECA Members may view this story in full color in online version of Volume 18 Number 1 January/February 2009 issue of Errorscope.  Just click the banner at the top of this page for access to the Errorscope Online login page.


In The News ...
"Minor" 1972 Double Die Sells for $2,250.00!


Images used with the permission of Teletrade, Inc.

    January 28, 2009 -- You might just want to think twice before you refer to any 1972 doubled die obverse except Die #1 as minor!  A Professional Coin Grading Service certified example of a 1972 doubled die obverse #4 in MS63 Brown just sold on Teletrade on January 25 for a whopping $2,250.00!  This is almost ten times the price of the major 1972 doubled die #1 in the same grade, which can be found listed on the PCGS Price Guide at $260.00.
    According to Teletrade, ten unique bidders competed for the rarity of which most seasoned variety coin experts have only seen one or two specimens in their entire career vs. hundreds of examples of many of the other 1972 doubled die cent varieties.  It is one of only two specimens graded by PCGS with the other specimen grading MS64.
    An in-depth report on this variety with comments from many of the variety hobby's top experts can be found on page 4 of the February 16 issue of Coin World.  I'd like to thank Brian Allen for the heads up on this sale!  KP 


In The News ...
2008 "Peg Leg P" Van Buren Dollars Reported


Photo © Ken Potter 2009

    January 27, 2009 -- According to a front-page story in the January 13 issue of Numismatic News, author Ken Potter says:  "More peg leg Van Buren dollars have been brought to my attention since my Dec. 9 issue report of 2008-P Martin Van Buren dollars coming in that exhibited a "P" mintmark with most of the lower leg of the "P" missing making the "P" look like a stubby "D," or what some might call a "Peg Leg P."  Numismatic News reader David Kell of Pennsylvania was the first to make note of this to us and e-mailed images of one of them on Nov. 17. Garrett Reich of Michigan also found some and was the first to get an actual example to me to photograph a few days later."
   Since that time the reports have continued to mount and on Dec. 1, Pat Heller of Liberty Coin Service, Lansing, Mich., reported the following to Numismatic News: "We have only received a shipment of Van Buren Philadelphia dollars so far, to supply local folks collecting the dollars. Today we have multiple customers come in to return coins claiming we gave them the Denver mint specimens by accident."

See The Rest Of The Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Finds Include Counter-Clashed 10c, Dropped Letter 25c


Photos © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Richard Ross
"Dropped Letter" between R and T of Liberty.


Multiple Clash Marks from the Denver Mintmark can be seen on the reverse of this 1974-D dime.


Photos © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Ron Ciampichini
Here we can see how the multiple clash marks of the D from the reverse (see top photo) counter-clashed back to the obverse.


Photos © Ken Potter 2008 
What at first glance appears to be an off center with post mint damage turns out to be an off center struck on a sheared planchet.
Notice the concave edge where metal from the obverse and reverse  flowed out beyond the original shear point.

    January 18, 2009 --  Richard Ross of Mississippi submitted a 2007-D Idaho State quarter that boasts what is known as a Dropped Letter or Dropped Design error. A close look at the word LIBERTY on the obverse reveals an incuse “extra” letter “R” positioned low and between the normal R and T.  Also shown is a 1953-D/D RPM#1 cent, a 1999-P Broadstruck and Indented nickel, a 1974-D Counter-Clash dime, a 1999-P Off Center dime struck in a sheared planchet, an Off Center quarter, and other errors and varieties in the January 6 issue of Numismatic News.  See the hardcopy version of the story for all images or see the stripped down online version via the link below.

See The Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Will The Real "Extra Bear Claw" Please Stand Up


Images courtesy of Robert Wilharm

    January 18, 2009 -- Old-time error-variety specialist Robert Wilharm of Texas (who was an editor with John Wexler of Error-Variety News back in the late 1970s through the early 1980s) wrote to say: "If you have not been flooded with die errors for the [2008-P] Alaska quarter you might want to see these." He included images of some minor die error-varieties on three different pieces.
    The first was one of the so-called "Extra Bear Claw" variations that have been touted on eBay with the suggestion that they are actually a Mint mistake where an extra claw was erroneously incorporated into the design. Nothing could be further from the truth, as this variation is nothing more than a very minor die break in the area of the bear's claws.

Read The Numismatic News Version Of The Story

Read The Numismaster Version Of The Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Split Die Strike


Image courtesy of Tom Woods

    January 14, 2009 --  Tom Woods of Pennsylvania wrote in to lean more about a 2007-P dime that he found.  He said: "I've reached the age of 70 [and have] been somewhat of a coin collector for the past 40 years. In 2007, I spotted this dime in change I received while vacationing in the Outer Banks, North Carolina."  What he has is a nice Split Die Strike with a number of die chips and die breaks intermittently spaced along the split.  One large retained die break covers a significant area of the center of the olive branch.
    He also wanted to know the value of the coin to determine if it was worth sending in for grading and slabbbing. Having noticed that Mike Diamond had wrote about these recently, I decided to defer to his expertise in this area.  He responded saying:  "I am very familiar with this error. I have one and Fred Weinberg has several. It shows an asymmetrical split die straddled by a retained interior die break. Since this is a recent dime, the reverse die would have functioned as the hammer die. I would estimate its value at $150.00."  Alan Herbert also chimed in confirming that he'd classify it as a "Split Die" and referred to it as a "Nice Coin!" 


Recent Finds ...
Roll Finds: 1983 DDR, Euro Cud & More


Images courtesy of Pete Acampora

    January 13, 2009 -- ANA Member, Pete Acampora wrote to report on a 1983 Doubled Die Reverse cent that he found in a roll of cents on Sunday, August 31, 2008. He also wrote about many other finds that he has made in recent months saying: "I have been sending results of my finds each week to Bill O'Rourke [Coin World's Found In Rolls columnist] and he has already verified that the find is indeed a bonafide 1983 DDR! Since that time, I submitted the coin to PCGS and it was returned graded and slabbed as an MS64 Red.
    I started searching rolls back in April 2007 and some of my finds include: 1910-S/S, two1917-S/S, 1928-S/S, two 1941-S/S, four 1998 Wide AM cents, six 2000 Wide AM cents, a 2000 2-Euro coin with a large cud at 4:00 o'clock, two 1983 cents with reverse die cracks (not breaks as Bill explained to me), one planchet, an off-center cent, two 1989 Abraded Lincolns with 1988 designer's initials, 1005 wheat cents, three 1960 Small dates, 35 1960-D Small Dates, two of the old "JFK facing Lincoln" etched cents, 1983-S and 1984-S Proof cents, $2.25 in Euro's, 17 US 10c pieces (non silver), an 1887 Seated Dime, 1893 and 1897 Indian Head cents, 1901 and 1903 V Liberty nickels. This week (January 4th, 2009) I found a 1963/3-D Lincoln.
    Bill O'Rourke wrote an article on this find in October in Coin World but advised me that it was OK to inform CONECA of the find. 
    I'm the treasurer of the Westchester County Coin Club and let the club know of my find back in September. I gave a talk to the club in July on searching for small treasures in rolls and have been reporting my finds each month since. This find absolutely excited and dumbfounded them. A few members told me that they started searching rolls due to my speech which is really nice to hear.
    Our club president, Jon Lerner of Scarsdale Coin, invited me to give a similar speech at Coin Fest on Saturday, November 8. The '83DDR was the highlight of my speech with the 1897 Indian, 1887 Seated Dime as well all the other error coins exhibited.


In The News ...
Roll Find: 1971-D JFK Struck On 25c Stock 


Image © Ken Potter 2008

      January 09, 2009 -- According to a story in Numismatic News, a reader from Mississippi found a 1971-D Kennedy half dollar struck on a planchet of quarter-dollar thickness or what is called a “Wrong Stock” error. It weighs 8.8 grams versus the normal 11.34 grams for a clad half.

See Rest Of The NN Story

See The Numismaster Version Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
1972-D Multiple Error JFK Described
by Mike Diamond


Images courtesy of Mike Diamond
Click Here To See Enlarged View

    January 05, 2009 -- This 1972-D half dollar shows a 90 degree rotated die error and a major vertical misalignment (tilted die error). The weight is normal. The right side of the obverse shows a strongly finned rim -- the result of increased localized striking pressure. This is where the die was tilted down. On the left side the design fades out -- this is where the die was tilted up.
There's no way to tell for sure which die was out of alignment, but I strongly suspect the obverse (hammer) die, since in the vast majority of cases where the culprit can be identified, it turns out to be the hammer die.
    The cause of the rotation and tilt cannot be determined with any degree of specificity. The die could have been loose or the entire die assembly could have been loose. The die might have broken across the neck or the neck/shaft junction.


In The News ...
1942-S Inverted S Mercury 10c Featured


Image © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin Courtesy of Al Raddi


Images © Ken Potter 1998 / Coins Courtesy of Brian Allen
At top is a 1942-S Inverted S 10c reported by Brian Allan in 1998; below is a normal S for comparison.

    January 02, 2009 -- A 1942-S Winged Head Liberty dime boasting an Inverted Mintmark is featured in the Varieties Notebook column in the January 5 issue of Coin World.  It was found by CONECA member, Al Raddi after he read about one submitted by CONECA member Brian Allen that was reviewed two months earlier in the same column.  The variety is listed for the upcoming fifth edition of the Cherrypickers' Guide To Rare Die Varieties Bill Fivaz and J.T. Stanton as FS-501 and appears so far to be very scarce to rare.  It is characterized by a more oval center within the upper loop of the S, a diagnostic normally found at the lower end of this Mintmark style.  Also featured in the article was a 1985-D cent with plating split doubling on the Mintmark.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Members Share ...
Most Doubling On "Steelies" NOT Doubled Dies or RPMs!


Image © Ken Potter 2004
Here is a strong example of die deterioration doubling on a 1943-D Steel cent.

    December 22, 2008 -- One of  more frequent questions that variety coin attributers must field focuses on doubling found a potpourri of different issues.  One of the most frequent involves die deterioration doubling, a form of doubling that is associated with worn dies that often goes hand in hand with "orange peel" surfaces.  The other day I received the following question that is typical of many that I get on this subject:  "I just found a 1943 steel cent in my collection that contains a super wide doubled die and double Mintmark and I can't find it listed anywhere.  This one has to be rare and I want to know how it get it listed."  Unfortunately, more than 99% of the time, what collectors are referring to is one of the many examples of die deterioration doubling that plagues the issue.
    1943 Steel Cents or what should be more appropriately referred to as zinc plated steel cents, were minted by the U.S. for general circulation in 1943 as a stop-gap measure to save on copper needed for munitions in the war effort.  Minted at all three Mints operating at the time, (Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco), the steel cent planchets proved to be very tough on the dies and as a result caused the dies to deteriorate faster and more extensively than dies used to strike the copper alloy cents struck before and after 1943.  It is also possible that the dies were used for longer periods of time as an economy move to save on labor and die steel.
    The result is that die deterioration doubling is exceedingly common on steel cents from all Mints!  It is hard to look through a roll of steel cents and not find at least a few examples!  While some nice doubled dies and Repunched Mintmarks do exist for this date/denomination and should not be overlooked, most coins found with doubling are neither of these collectable types.
    Another U.S. coin to watch out for that has been over-sensationalized over the decades is the 1955 Lincoln cent referred to as a "Poor Man's Double Die."  These coins have been marketed for years under this misleading term, riding on the coattails of  the famous 1955 doubled die cent.  The promoters knew that not everybody could afford a true 1955 doubled die and in response came up with this gimmick to help sell the far more common die deterioration doubling.  Die deterioration doubling plagues this U.S. issue perhaps in quantities second only to the 1943 steel cents or maybe even more so. Die deterioration doubling is referred to as "Abrasion Doubling" by some specialists. KP


Recent Finds ...
1996-D Cent w/Lathe Lines


Photo © Ken Potter 1997

    December 11, 2008 -- A reader sent in a description of a 1996-D cent that he found with circular lathe lines like those shown in the image above.  He had several questions to which I felt the answers made interesting reading that visitors of this page might enjoy.  While I'm nor reproducing the questions I am presenting the answers as follows:
    After examining the coin shown here, a Philadelphia Mint spokesman that I conferred with during a Coin World sponsored VIP tour in 1997, advised me that because the Denver Mint die shop was new at making dies in 1996, he suspected that they probably had not polished the die blanks sufficiently to remove all the lathe lines.  The lines were created when the die blank was machined from a cylinder of steel according to him and we can presume that if this is accurate, that the hubbing process did not eliminate them completely. As an aside, the polishing process for die blanks had been recently automated at Philadelphia Mint at the time I was there in 1997 and they spent considerable time touting the new technology to us that day.  Since the Denver Mint die shop was new in 1996 I assumed the die blank polishing process to be automated there too -- but this may not have been the case.  I just do not know for sure. Thus, according to the Mint these lines were lathed into the individual die blanks (and no mention was made of them being on the hub).
    Based on the number of these coins that I've seen, I'd have to guess that many dies were involved and possibly millions of coins showing these effects to varying degrees produced. These lines show strongest on early die state coins and tend to disappear on the later die states, so the strongest ones like the one shown here are probably not nearly as common as the weaker ones which are probably only noticed by the most astute error-variety specialists on mint state coins.
    I'm not aware of any of these circular lines appearing on the 1996-D cent reverses or even other denominations which does make one wonder why or if the problem only existed for a short time before it was noticed and fixed.
    The Mint's primary concern is to make coins that will circulate and some of the more common occurrences like the so-called Phantom D Mintmarks on Philadelphia cents and the circular lathe lines of this era did not seem to bother the Mints at all. Collectively, I'd have to guess that they pumped millions of them into circulation.
    Since Mint Sets of this era were assembled from early die state coins you may find examples of these more easily there than on general circulation coins and they may also prove to help you more so in your research.
    They have never caught on as being highly-sought-after varieties (and at the time they were first noticed there was some debate on the message boards as to whether or not they should even be considered a variety) but they are very interesting and probably need more research. The Mint's opinion on these may not be the final word. KP


Recent Finds ...
1983 Doubled Die Found in Change


Image courtesy of Robert Van Leer

    December 09, 2008 -- CONECA member, Robert (Bob) C. Van Leer of Fla, reports finding a 1983 Doubled Die Reverse cent in circulation change.  He wrote in on December 2, to say: "I have been looking through the stash of pennies my friend has (about 7000 so far) and when I saw this one I nearly fell out of my chair. My wife thought I had gone nuts when I ran to tell her to have a look. This is something I have NEVER SEEN outside of the 1955 and 1972. Please tell me it is REAL!"   Bob, it is indeed the real McCoy -- a DDR-001!  Van Leer's friend, Mr. Feit, is his next door neighbor who has been putting cents into a wicker basket for about 30 years.  Van Leer says that he found a nice 1998 Wide AM cent in the first 200 that he searched and several S mints and that he is now getting down to the bronze and wheat cents near the bottom third but that he still a long way to go.  Good luck Bob!  


Recent Finds ...
Tilted Mintmarks Elicit Queries


Photo © Ken Potter 2007/Coin courtesy of Jeramy Egan

December 08, 2008 -Prior to the 1990's, coinage dies prepared at the Philadelphia Mint for itself (during the limited years it employed Mintmarks) and for shipment to branch Mints, (such as the Denver and San Francisco Mints), had their Mintmarks punched into the individual dies by hand.  This was a tedious process that resulted in many variations of the Mintmark, including the depth that it was sunk, the angle at which it was applied, variations in location, different font styles and sizes used within a single year, Over Mintmarks, Repunched Mintmarks, various degrees of rotation (or tilts), etc. Over the years the hobby has paid scant attention to rotational tilts as a collectable unless they were rotated 180 degrees or nearly so (as is known on a number of San Francisco mintmarked coins).  The logic has always been that since the application of a Mintmark into a die was a hand operation that a certain degree of latitude had to be expected.  Thus, it is considered within normal tolerance for a Mintmark to be tilted rotationally to the varying degrees they are sometimes seen.
    In time that perspective might change for some of the more dramatic examples but for now with the absence of catalogers listing them it may be sometime before any of them they catch on if they ever do. Jeramy Egan of Vermont sent in a 1941-S Lincoln cent with a Large S Mintmark that has a strong counterclockwise tilt. I tend to look at this one and ask: why not collect it?  It’s neat even it it isn't worth much and you never know, someday as the series gets needle picked more and more for varieties, ones as obvious as this one might catch on.


In The News ...
Two 1970-S/S RPMs Found In Mint-Set

    December 03, 2008 -- According to a story in the current issue of Numismatic News, Helen Seto of Michigan turned up a very unusual government issue mint set that contained two1970-S cents. To make it even more interesting, both cents contained a strong Repunched Mintmark variety listed by CONECA as RPM-001.  

See The Rest Of Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions)


In The News ...
Readers Send in Die Deterioration Doubling, Split Die, etc.

    December 04, 2008 -- According to a story in Numismatic News Gary Dooley of West Virginia sent in a 2000-P Virginia State quarter that shows die deterioration doubling on both the obverse and reverse and a bit of strike doubling on the reverse, both of which author Ken Potter explains adds no value to the coin. Other submissions came from Gil Medina who sent in images of a 1981-P Roosevelt dime featuring a Split Die Strike.  Peter Torres of Illinois sent in a1996-D Lincoln cent that displays some damage on Lincoln's earlobe making it look like a doubled die plus a 1943-P Jefferson nickel with a very interesting semicircular die break running through the center of the 3 of the date.  Glen Grove of Ohio sent in a 1992-P Washington quarter with a small strike-through error, and a 2008-P New Mexico State quarter that shows a fairly large multifaceted die break.  Jim Barnett of Idaho sent in a 2008-P John Q. Adams Presidential dollar that sports what he calls "pox" all over the President's face that are actually a series of tiny die chips.  The condensed  version of the story (image-wise) can be seen vie the link below while the the story with all images can be seen in the current issue of Numismatic News.

See The Rest Of Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Pocket Change Finds Include 1998 Wide AM


Images courtesy of Joe Thompson


Photo © Ken Potter 2000
Here is a closer look at the 'Wide AM' variety.

    November 23, 2008 -- CONECA Member, Joe Thompson reports finding a 1998 'Wide AM' Lincoln cent in his pocket change. In the image of the uppermost coin you can see the normal 'Close AM' variety, which sports an M of AMERICA that is shifted close left to A of AMERICA and far from the E.  The lower image is of the 'Wide AM variety, which exhibits an M that is well centered between the A and E of AMERICA.  Frank Gasparro's designer initials, FG, are found further from the lower right side of the Memorial building on the 'Close AM' variety than on the Wide AM where they are, of course, closer.
   
The 'Wide AM' variety was created when the Mint inadvertently processed dies intended for proof coinage as business strike dies.  The same error occurred again in 1999 and 2000.  Conversely, some 1998-S and 1999-S proof cents can be found mated with a reverse die bearing the 'Close AM' business strike reverse processed as proof dies.  Additionally, somehow just before the transition in 1993 after the new 'Close AM' dies were prepared at least one 'Close AM' die (for each Mint) was used to produce a very small quantity of 1992 and 1992-D cents with the Close AM design (everything prior to 1993 should have been 'Wide AM'). These are presumed by some to be test-strikes minted at the end of 1992 to make sure the dies were compatible for striking with the obverse designs.  Both 1992 and 1992-D 'Close AM' varieties are very rare in any grade.  Another more minor reverse design style transitional variety is known for the 1988  cent.  You can learn more it here: Design Varieties.


Recent Finds ...
'Found In Rolls' Website Neat!


Images courtesy of Bill O'Rourke
Here's a 1972 Doubled Die Reverse #1, a 1969-D Laminated Obverse and a
1983 Doubled Die Reverse that are all featured on the 'Found In Rolls' website.

    November 13, 2008 -- If you enjoy the recent finds featured on this website then you'll also enjoy a visit to Bill O'Rourke's "Found In Rolls" website!  Bill is the author of a column by the same name that appears monthly in Coin World.  He is one of the early contributors to my Coin World, Varieties Notebook column, so it was nice to bump into his website one day as I was googling something about error coins. Not everything on the site is error-variety related but you'll get a kick out of the many errors and varieties he has found plus a look at some of the foreign coins, tokens, medals and altered coins (amongst other things) that he and others have found in rolls.  He has also started a second website, Ask About Coins, dedicated to answering questions.

See The Found In Rolls Site Here  

See The Ask About Coins Site Here


In The News ...
A Look Back At The Detached-Leg Bison 5c 


Photo © Ken Potter 2005
Here is a look at one of the so-called Detached-Leg abraded die varieties.  Also
note the weakness of the underside behind the bison's front right leg.

   November 11, 2008 -- I recently received a question on the current value for a 2005-P Westward Journey Bison nickel with a "Detached Leg." A few years ago the coins were selling for hundreds of dollars on the television network outlets that were promoting them.  So I decided to check and see what their current values are ...

See The Numismatic News Story Here

See The Rest Of The Numismaster Story Here


In The News ...
Engraver's Initials Missing 


Photo © Ken Potter 2008 (inset courtesy of the US Mint)

    November 04, 2008 -- Ed Gralnik is the first person to send in examples of an error on a 2008 Alaskan State quarter.  He sent two Philadelphia Mint specimens struck with “filled dies” that are missing US Mint engraver, Charles Vickers’ initials.  They are normally found near the rim just to the lower right of the Bear’s upheld front paw as “CLV.”  They can be seen in the image courtesy of the US Mint.
    Collectors should note that “filled dies” or “strike thrus” are considered striking errors and are not die varieties.  Thus, missing areas of design that may occur due to die abrasion that sometimes become popular collectables, such as the missing FG designer’s initials on some 1982-P Kennedy half dollars and the 1937-D 3-Legged Buffalo nickels, or through omission such as the 1982 No P Mintmark dimes, (the result of the Mint forgetting to add the Mintmark to the die), are not related to this type of variation.  Missing designs due to die abrasion rarely catch on but a few have in a handful of cases, (including those noted above), while Mintmark omissions have proven to be extremely popular.
    Filled die errors range from minor examples to majors with values ranging that from just a few cents over face value to hundreds of dollars just depending in the severity and coin type effected.  Generally, ones like Gralnik’s, where the goop only obliterates a few letters are considered minor and are worth a dollar or two at best on the States Quarters series where they are extremely common.  However, his examples are a bit more interesting in that the effect is conspicuous.  I’d guess them to be worth somewhat more perhaps up into the lower two figures area.  Of course, this is just an opinion.  KP


  In The News ...
Look At Mint Set Yields Error


Photos © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Thomas Searfoss
Notice that you can barely read the date and Mintmark on this coin.

    November 03, 2008 -- Some folks have taken to heart the Sept. 23 Numismatic News story on plain edge Presidential dollars found in 2008 mint sets. Not only have they started searching these sets but also those from 2007. 
    Thomas Searfoss of Florida decided to check his 2007 set and found a Philadelphia-minted George Washington dollar with the edge inscription virtually missing. 

See The Numismatic News Story 

See The Numismaster Version Of The Story


 

 

 In The News ...
Where Are All The Proof Jefferson Errors?


Photos © Ken Potter 2008
If the 2007-S Jefferson dollar in your set exhibits the edge inscription
in the sequence shown in the mockup above, you have one of the errors.

    October 31, 2008 -- It’s been over seven months since collectors were alerted of a major edge inscription error found on 2007-S proof Thomas Jefferson Presidential dollars.  Yet to date, there have been no reports of additional finds since the first four specimens were originally publicized in late March. The error involves out-of-sequence mottos on the edges of the coins.  Instead of correctly reading: “2007 S - E PLURIBUS UNUM  - IN GOD WE TRUST,” the edges on the error dollars read, “2007 S - IN GOD WE TRUST  – E PLURIBUS UNUM.” 

See The Numismatic News Story

See The Numismaster Version Here

Recent Finds ...
Interesting Die Dent On Bison 5c


Photos © Ken Potter 2005

   October 25, 2008 -- It looks like the band of warriors that “speared” the now infamous so-called 2005-D "Speared Bison" nickel in Denver moved all the way into Philadelphia and “tomahawked” another bison there!  Now, if you believe this, I got a bridge to sell you!  What we are really talking about here is a 2005-P Bison five-cent piece with an interesting shaped die dent just behind the Bison’s upper right shoulder.  At least one observer decided this die dent looked like a tomahawk and began calling it a “Tomahawked Bison” and on eBay its been seen referred to as the “Broken Tomahawk” variety. Gary Silay Jr was the first to report one to me in March, 2005.
    Most error-variety coin specialists agree that nicknames such as those noted here, are misleading and that they should be referred to as what they really are or at the very least explained immediately after the use of the nickname as to what they are such as "tomahawk-shaped die break."  However, my father collected tomahawks as a kid (those found on his uncle's farm) and I've got to tell you after seeing them first-hand for many years, I fail the see any resemblance to a tomahawk here!  Neat die dent though ...  KP

Recent Finds ...
Glickman Finds JFK on SBA Planchet!


Click On Picture To See The Story And Enlarged Views

    October 20, 2008 -- CONECA member Ken Glickman has found the second Kennedy half-dollar stuck on a Susan B. Anthony dollar planchet to be reported this year!  The first one was reported on this site on June 13 and can be seen by scrolling down the page.  It was dated 1980-P. To learn more about Ken's amazing find and to see close up pictures, go to his website where it is featured, by clicking on the image above. 

You can visit Ken's main site at: Home Of The Kennedy Half Dollar

 

Readers Share ...
Planchet Found in 5 Yen Roll

    October 15, 2008 -- Steve Hansen recently found a planchet in a BU roll of Japanese 5 Yen coins.  He included pictures of one of the struck coins, the planchet and roll they were found in. He said, "I bought the roll along with several other odd items last month. I do not know the year/date of the coin. Everything is printed in Japanese on the roll wrapper."  Neat find!

Members Share ...
BJ Neff & Bob Piazza's Trail Dies Work Made Public

    October 14, 2008 - BJ Neff and Bob Piazza have officially announced the opening of www.traildies.com, a new site that deals exclusively with the die variety called trails. The site has over 700 trail dies, from the cent to the dollar, identified with color photos of both the anomaly and the associated die markers. So, if you have a few of this type of variety and have wondered what they are, visit the site and see the discussion and listings. 

In The News ...
Dropped Letter 25c, Dbl Stuck 5c, DDO 1c & Clip Featured


Photos © Ken Potter 2008

    October 11, 2008 -- Tracy Miller of Florida found a 2005-P West Virginia state quarter with a “Dropped Letter” showing as a letter “T” dropped out in the field.  He also reported several other errors including a 1988-P Double Struck Jefferson nickel (see above) as noted in Ken Potter's recent feature in Numismatic News.

See The Online Version Of The Story Here 

See the October 14, 2008 Issue of  Numismatic News for all sixteen (16) images associated with the story.

Readers Share ...
Strike Doubling On 1995 Eagle


Photos © Ken Potter 2007

    October 09, 2008 -- William Anderson of SC sent in a 1995 American Silver Eagle that shows Strike Doubling on the date, upper exergue, bottoms of both of Miss Liberty's sandals and Adolph Weinman's, designer initials. Also referred to as "machine doubling damage," "mechanical doubling," and "ejection doubling," (and other lesser used terms), strike doubling is a form of doubling that most specialists agree occurs to a coin due to die bounce from vibrations that set up in a working press.  Most agree that it occurs within a split second after the coin is struck and just prior to or during ejection.  Other than a few rare forms of strike doubling not covered here, it does not add value or elicit much interest from error-variety specialists nor will any of the major grading services recognize it as an error or variety.  Strike doubling is exceedingly common on U.S. and other world coins and can be found on most dates and denominations.  Though there are varying opinions, it is considered a form of damage by most specialists.
See Machine Doubling Damage in the CONECA Glossary for more information.

 

Members  Share ...
Fred Weinberg's Fantastic 1c/10c Bowtie!
by Ken Potter - NLG



Images courtesy of Fred Weinberg & Co.

    June 29, 2008 -- Here's a look at a 2005 Lincoln cent that was struck over a piece of bowtie shaped webbing, (or what is technically known as "scissel)," that landed in the die underneath the planchet that was struck into the 2005 cent shown here.  Bowtie strikes are unusual enough to find but when they are struck into another coin it is even rarer to find both the coin and the bowtie strike.  Even more unusual is that the bowtie featured here is of a cupronickel clad composition suggesting that it is from the production of dime blanks!  To the best of my knowledge this is the only known bowtie shaped scrap from dime stock struck by Lincoln cent dies!
     Blanks are punched from long coils or strips of metal that are passed through a blanker press where ganged punches, punch and shear out a number of blanks in a single stroke.  As the process continues, the strip advances and the press cycles again to blank out another section while the forward section containing the webbing is simultaneously sheered off to be chopped into small pieces for recycling.  This chopped up webbing is one source of bowtie shaped scrap.  Another source is from a section of strip that has already been blanked out that fails to advance far enough to clear the punches for the next cycle.  This wayward section of webbing may be punched out again with area between where two blanks were already processed punched out as a bowtie shaped blank.


Here is a look at a section of blanked out coinage strip (webbing) from a German Mint.


Images of webbing © 2008 Ken Potter
Here we illustrate with the black circle where a bowtie shaped blank might be cut from if the
punched out strip passed under the ganged punches a second time.

 

  Our Favorite Errors ...
1970-D Jefferson Begs Explanation
Explanation & Images by Mike Diamond

    January 18, 2007 -- Mike Diamond sent in neat images of a 1970-D Jefferson five-cent piece with an unusual error that at first can be rather baffling as to how it occurred.  Mike's explanation is: "Here's an interesting error I recently obtained from Fred Weinberg.  The first strike was normal.  The second strike was about 20% off-center and very weak.  It's die-struck on the reverse.  The obverse shows a weak, mirror brockage that covers about 80% of the obverse.  It is more-or-less aligned with the die-struck design on the reverse, but is rotated about 90 degrees relative to it.  Most likely something interfered with normal die approximation on the second strike so that, at their closest approach, the two dies were almost as far apart as the combined thickness of the two coins between them.

See More & Larger Images Of The Coin Here

Members are invited to send images of some of their favorite errors to be featured in this column.  Send an image(s) and some text explaining what the coin is or why the coin is one of your favorites to the editor by clicking here:  Our Favorite Errors 

Members Share ...
Diamond Acquires Dime-Stock 25c In Mint Set!


Images courtesy of Mike Diamond


Click On Image For Larger View

    September 28, 2008 -- CONECA President, Mike Diamond wrote to say, "I recently purchased a 1970-D dime stock quarter that was part of a Denver mint set. It's still in the original plastic. I thought it was an unusual find. The coin plus the plastic weighs 4.5 grams, vs. the 5.67 grams of a naked normal quarter."
    So if you haven't checked 1970 Mint sets yet for dime stock quarters, now might be a good time to start!  You may also want to check for the many doubled dies that can be found in these sets!  In particular, look for the 1970-D cents, dimes and quarters.  Also, at least one dime stock quarter has been found with a significant doubled die reverse!  It may have come from a Mint set.  Also check the sets for RPMs with the 1970-S/S RPM#1 cent being the highlight.  I recently purchased the Philadelphia/San Francisco half of a 1970 Mint set that contained two 1970-S cents and both were the S/S!  Go here to the CONECA Master Listings to see which doubled dies and RPMs can be found in Mint Sets.   Hint: all the Doubled Dies and RPMs that can be found in Mint sets are noted as such with a note in gold lettering.   KP

Check Out Mike Diamond's Error-Variety Checklist


Commercial News ...
Heritage Releases Top 10 Buffalo's List


Images courtesy of Heritage Auction Galleries

    September 27, 2008 -- For "This Week's Top Ten" feature, Heritage Auction Galleries' September 27, 2008 eNewsletter offers their list of the "Ten Most Valuable Buffalo Nickels Auctioned by Heritage."  Interestingly, the list includes six fantastic Buffalo nickel varieties that'll make your mouth water!  So without further ado here they are:

  1. 1916 5C Doubled Die Obverse MS64 PCGS, sold for $264,500.

  2. 1918/7-D 5C MS65 NGC, sold for $155,250.

  3. 1917-S 5C MS67 NGC, sold for $138,000.

  4. 1918/7-D 5C MS64 PCGS, sold for $126,500.

  5. 1919-S 5C MS66 PCGS, sold for $109,250.

  6. 1920-D 5C MS66 PCGS, sold for $97,750.

  7. 1919-S 5C MS66 NGC, sold for $92,000.

  8. 1937-D 5C Three-Legged MS66 PCGS, sold for $86,250.

  9. 1918/7-D 5C MS64 NGC, sold for $85,100.

  10. 1918/7-D 5C MS 64 PCGS, sold for $83,950.


Recent Finds ...
Large Cent Enthusiast Finds 1846 N-10


Image courtesy of "Toad"

    September 26, 2008 -- In spite of being an error-variety specialist for nearly three decades, I, as the CONECA webmaster and editor of this page, must freely admit that I know very little about errors and varieties on Early American Coppers! So with this submission I can add little (actually nothing) in way of explanation as to just how rare or significant this find is. All I can really report is that it was submitted to me as being found by a fellow saying, "I found another one (1800/1798 DBC NC-6)! It's currently in route to Bob Grellman for official attributing, along with a late die state 1846 BHC N-10 (gorgeous rim cud)."  The 1846 is shown here.  The rim cud runs on the obverse from about 9:00 to 11:00 o'clock. The submitter just goes by the handle "Toad" aka George.  Thanks Toad! KP


Readers Share ...
 Geo. Washington Dollar Found w/93-Degree Rotated Reverse
by Michael Rothwell


Image courtesy of NGC
The reverse is shown reflected into a mirror.  It illustrates just how far off this one was!

    September 23, 2008 -- I found this coin in a brand new Denver roll at our bank here in Decorah, Iowa right after they were first released. My discovery of it was pure FLUKE! Let me explain: As you recall, immediately, there was all the hype on the Missing Edge Lettering George Washington dollars. Of course, I wanted to see what I could find, as at that time, it wasn't broadly known of the mass amounts of Missing Edge Lettering George Washington dollars sent to the Florida district from the Philly Mint. So, that's what I was searching for ... in a Denver roll!  I had also seen people making claims to the "upside down" edge lettering. "WOW!," I thought!  I had 13 out of 25 of them! Of course we now know that isn't an 'error' at all. However, I placed the 13 coins in 2" x 2" Mylar cardboard flips and started scanning the obverse and reverse of each coin. I was on about the fourth or fifth coin and I scanned the obverse, then did the "180-flip" on the scanner bed and scanned the reverse. "Something" was wrong! I was pretty sure I flipped the coin just like the rest before.  So I re-checked and that's when I noticed, "Hey! This is waaaay off here!" Total Fluke discovery!  It came back from NGC graded MS65 "Rotated Dies."

Read More About Rotated Reverses Here


Recent Finds ...
Korean War Dollar Found w/90-Degree Rotated Reverse

    September 23,  2008 -- Brad Meadows, Senior Numismatist at Heritage Auction Galleries wrote to tell me that an interesting error came in for their October sale.  It is a 1991-P Proof Korean War Commemorative dollar with a 90 degree rotated reverse error.  He made it clear that it certainly wasn't  the most major error to come in to the firm but that he thought it unusual in that such an error could exist on the coin for over 15 years before being reported.  Now the question is, how many more are there?  I suggest that everybody who owns these coins check them for this error!  The coin was certified by Numismatic Guaranty Corporation as a Proof-69 Ultra Cameo. KP

Read The Numismaster Story

Read the Numismatic News Online Story

Read More About Rotated Reverses Here

    Note: this coin eventually sold on December 4 in the Heritage 2008 December Houston, TX Signature Coin Auction #1118 for $805.00.


Recent Finds ...
Is It The 1918-D 'No Monogram' Variety?


Image © Ken Potter 2007 / Coin courtesy of Edward Cook

    August 09, 2008 (Updated September 13, 2008) -- Edward Cook of Ohio sent this coin in for a peek asking if it was the 'Without Monogram' variety (Breen#5139) that Walter Breen lists in his Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. & Colonial Coins.  Unfortunately, I cannot be sure and as such my answer to Mr. Cook was:  "Your 1918-D half dollar does appear to be the variety listed by Walter Breen without designer’s initials but I’d be hesitant to attribute it as such based on the coin’s grade.  In my opinion, the coin has seen too much circulation wear for anybody to be 100% sure the initials were not “chased” away (filled in) via filling the voids with surrounding metal or even possibly wear alone.  With that said however, I doubt this is the case; I just cannot prove it is good and thus must hedge some and call it a “no decision” coin that probably is what you think it is.  Somebody more intimately familiar with the variety may be able to find some markers to prove it is the variety. "
    So my question is, is there anybody that has a way of telling if this is indeed the No Monogram variety?  If so, please contact me at
conecawebmaster  KP.

    September 13, 2008 -- Mark Harper wrote to say:
    "There maybe a way possible to find out if the voids have been filled.  It is a NDT (will not damage the coin) method called Eddy Current. With the right probe and equipment you should be able to tell. Basically there is a electrical field introduced into the coin and it will create eddies in the coin.  Now if you check (scan) a known good part of the coin and compare it to the area in question and the field does not change the area has not been filled in. But if it does move that means the probe and coin are no longer in a balanced state=Moved material/underlying flaw -etc.
    I have the knowledge of how to do it but I don't have the equipment. Very $$$.  Things that you need to know: How deep and wide was the original monogram and how deep into the coin do you want to check? This will determine the frequency to use. The area to scan this will determine the probe size (not sure what the smallest probe size is. The area maybe to small?). 
    Now the catch is if the area was ground away the change in balance would not happen but there should be a very noticeable dip in the coin!
    This would be the only way I would know unless you looked at the coin under much much higher power microscope to see if the metal was moved!"
    In a follow up email he said, "I just talked to an NDT expert. It is possible to check for the monogram under the surface. Two ways could work. One is eddy current as noted and the other is X-ray. A simple method of X-ray that may work is at the local dental office. With the new computer X-rays you get a picture right away with almost no cost.  The only thing is that this type of X-ray may be to weak. But if it does work you should be able to see the faint out line in the coin (if it is there).
    I have been using NDT on my coins to look for fakes, for sorting, etc., (I use the equipment at work). I have found a Peace dollar that was made of lead. I have found fake trade dollars--wrong silver content, etc. I think that NDT has a very good place in the coin grading/authentication business. Do the major coin graders use NDT?  If not I think I would like to help out the coin world.

Editor's Note:  NDT (Non Destruct Testing) with a variety of tools is a technology I was trained in and used on a daily basis for years.  While I am not necessarily convinced that a probe exists that is small enough to test the area in question or if it is sensitive enough to detect small alterations on a coin, I am convinced that there may be some applications for NDT available in coin authentication and perhaps in the manner that Mr. Harper describes above.   Interesting thoughts!  KP


In The News ...
'Smooth Edge' Monroe & Jackson Dollars Found
In Government-Issue Mint Sets


  Images courtesy of ICG / Coins Courtesy of First Commemorative Mint
Here is a look at two of the 2008 Philadelphia minted Matte or Satin finish dollars found sans the edge inscription.

    September 12, 2008 -- Ladies and Gentlemen, it’s time to rev up your motors for the race to search 2008 government issued Mint Sets for Plain Edge Presidential dollars! Plain-edge James Monroe and Andrew Jackson Presidential dollars are turning up in the 2008 annual uncirculated coin sets popularly called mint sets produced by the U.S. Mint. Independent Coin Grading Company of Englewood, Colo., reports finding at least four examples in the receiving department.  Out of 5,000 sets searched by ICG personnel Stan Biggers and Yolanda Lopez, three James Monroe dollars and one Andrew Jackson dollar were found missing the edge inscription: “ . 2008 P . E PLURIBUS UNUM . IN GOD WE TRUST”.  The sets were sent in for grading by First Commemorative Mint of Farmingdale, N.Y.  It is reasonable to assume that other examples of the errors got out into collector hands in orders shipped out in recent weeks.  More detailed stories on the finds can be found in the September 15 issue of Coin World and at the online Numismatic News and Numismaster links below.

See Rest Of Numismatic News Story
See The Numismaster Version Of The Story

    September 12 Update:  We have just learned from Michael White, U.S. Mint Office of Public Affairs, that the Philadelphia Mint was unaware of these pieces being released.  His comments in an email were:
"The United States Mint at Philadelphia has no first hand evidence to confirm these reports. After striking, the Presidential dollar coins are transported to the edge letter machine approximately 10-feet from the press where they are struck, and are fed by hand into the edge lettering machine. After edge lettering, the Presidential dollar coins are bagged, with each bag containing documentation of the personnel that handled the coins, identifying the dies used, and the shift and date the coins were struck." 
    We have also learned from the First Commemorative Mint that no further smooth edge examples of these coins were found in an additional 1000 sets they submitted.  However, they did report that there were some found with what they called "partial lettering."


Recent Finds ...
1973-S Dollar Found On A Copper-Nickel Clad Planchet


Images courtesy of Numismatic Guarantee Corporation

    September 11, 2008 -- Numismatic Guarantee Corporation of Sarasota, Fla., has graded the first known example of a 1973-S uncirculated Ike dollar struck on a copper-nickel clad planchet. According to NGC, "Coins struck accidentally on planchets intended for other issues are known for quite a number of United States coin types, but they are rarely more spectacular than when occurring with dollar coins. This superb gem Eisenhower Dollar was struck at the San Francisco Mint for inclusion in the series of "blue pack" silver-clad dollars offered by the U. S. Mint at $3 apiece from 1971 to 1974.  At first glance it could almost pass for one of these silver-clad pieces, but inspection of its edge reveals the bright orange-red glow of a copper-nickel-clad planchet!"

See NGC Story

Read The Numismaster Story

Read the Numismatic News Online Story


In The News ...
   1954-D Franklin Half Dollar Featured


Image © Ken Potter 2006 / Coin courtesy of Tom Sparks
The arrows point to the areas that Sparks feels may be an S (red arrow) and a D (black arrow).

    September 07, 2008 -- A 1954-D Franklin half-dollar that Tom Sparks of WA feels may exhibit remnants of S and D Mintmarks is featured in the September 1, 2008 issue of Coin World.  In the article, author Ken Potter says, "these aberrations could very well represent a Dual Mintmark or a Repunched Mintmark or both.  However, an earlier die stage that shows more convincing proof of either possibility is necessary to its attribution."  Potter, (who is CONECA's World Die Variety attributer), and most other die variety coin attributers designate any coin bearing two different Mintmarks (such as a D and S) that are totally separated from one another as a dual mintmark (DMM) while a few others still lump such varieties in with the Over Mintmarks (OMMs).  Most attributers, define an OMM as a coin bearing two different Mintmarks that in someway overlap each other.  Also featured in his September column are a 1988-D RPM cent submitted by Wali Motorwalla and a 1984 cent with strike doubling damage submitted by Paul Guzewicz.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Commercial News ...
Heritage Releases Top 10 Error List


A look at a 1999 Lincoln Cent Obverse/Roosevelt Dime Revere Mule


Images courtesy of Heritage Auction Galleries
This is a one-cent planchet that was struck and indented into a 1973-S Ike dollar.

    September 07, 2008 -- For "This Week's Top Ten" feature Heritage Auction Galleries' August 30, 2008 eNewsletter offers their list of, "The highest value error coins Heritage has sold at auction."  While the list is not 100% accurate as Heritage has sold some far higher priced errors than some of those appearing on this list, it is nonetheless interesting and the photos are treat to look at.  So without further ado here they are:

  1. 1999 Lincoln Cent Obverse Die Muled With a Roosevelt Dime Reverse on a Lincoln Cent Planchet MS66 Red PCGS, sold for $138,000.
  2. 1859 Indian Cent--Obverse Struck on 1857 Half Dime--MS63 PCGS, sold for $71,875.
  3. 1862 Indian Cent--Obverse Die Cap--MS67 NGC, sold for $51,750.
  4. Undated Washington Quarter--Double Struck With Two Reverse Dies and Indent--MS66 NGC, sold for $41,975.
  5. 1973-S Eisenhower Dollar--Indented by 1.73 gm Planchet, Mated Pair--PR67 and PR67 RB NGC, sold for $40,250.
  6. 1904 Double Eagle--Double Struck in Collar--MS63 PCGS, sold for $37,375.
  7. 1909 Indian Cent--Struck on 1906 Barber Dime--MS65 NGC, sold for $37,375.
  8. 1977-D Eisenhower Dollar--Obverse Die Cap--MS67 NGC, sold for $29,900.
  9. 1882-CC GSA Morgan Dollar--Double Struck, 5% Off Center--MS62 NGC. VAM-2, sold for $29,900.
  10. 1943 Lincoln Cent--Struck on a 1943 Mercury Dime--MS62 NGC, sold for $28,750.

In The News ...
   Error-Variety Coins Featured In WWC & CW

     September 02, 208 -- CONECA President Mike Diamond's contributions to World Wide Coins and Coin World were apparent in recent weeks.  In his November 2008 WWC column he presents an overview on world doubled dies. One of the coins discussed is the well-known Mexican 1981/1982 20 centavos overdate which is actually a Class III doubled die.

    In two back-to-back guest columns for Coin World's, Collector's Clearinghouse, he discusses two lesser-known errors. In the August 25, 2008 issue he talks about "stiff collar errors."  These errors occur when an off-center planchet is driven past a collar frozen in the "up" position. This can result in a distorted coin or even one that is sheared in two. The photos shown here is of a quarter with a typical stiff collar error. The rounded shoulder on the face struck by the anvil die is characteristic. These errors are often misdiagnosed as simple broadstrikes, off-center strikes, misaligned die errors, or partial collar errors.


Images courtesy of Mike Diamond

   In his second column (Sept. 1, 2008) he discusses "surface film effects."  These develop when a planchet or coin is covered with a film of oil or grime. The double-struck 1999 cent shown here has a surface film afterimage. A nearly complete array of first-strike details is preserved as a shadow impression.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster (please -- only email submissions).


Commercial News ...
1831 Quarter Eagle Struck On 10c Planchet
Found In Bag Of Silver


Images courtesy of Heritage Auctions

    August 16, 2008 -- Heritage Auctions is offering one of the most interesting wrong planchet errors that we've heard of in years.  What is perhaps most unusual is how it was found.  According to the description in Heritage Auction#1116:  "This piece entered the channels of commerce and circulated as a dime for many years. Only recently and after 54 points of wear [it grades Good-6] did someone notice that the design was inconsistent with that of an 1831 dime. This piece was found in a bag of silver in North Texas, in May of this year. It is always interesting to scan the "Found in Rolls" column in Coin World. Foreign coins, tokens, silver coins are constantly found in rolls. But an 1831 quarter eagle struck on a dime planchet in a bag of silver?  This is the second example of this off-metal striking that is known."  

Read More About This Amazing Find


In The News ...
More Shifted Edge Inscription Errors Reported


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Ed Majzlik
On this Adams dollar the slippage caused the inscription to wrap all the way around
 the rim and end with the final T of TRUST on top of the 2 of date. 


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Rob Fischer
Here is a 2007-P Washington dollar with a missing clad layer from the reverse.

    August 15, 2008 --  Blame it on an errant dot.  In the July 29 issue of Numismatic News a shifted edge inscription error was reported found on a 2007-P George Washington Presidential dollar. Its cause was the absence of a dot between the mintmark and E PLURIBUS UNUM (EPU) where a wide space sans any inscription occurs, according to information provided by U.S. Mint spokesman Michael White. A third dot was added between the mintmark and EPU on the 2008 issues to correct this problem, White said. (These delimiter dots can also be found after EPU and TRUST on both the 2007 and 2008 issues).  Nonetheless, despite the addition of this dot, we are still seeing what White calls "slippage errors" on the 2008 issues that are of a prominence equal to those we saw in 2007.  Two different examples are shown with the first on the Washington dollar and the other on a 2008-P James Monroe dollar.
    Other errors featured are a 2007-D Washington dollar Struck-Through 'Mint Goop' and a 2007-P Washington dollar with a Missing Clad Layer.
    Note:  Scroll down the page to see images of a Shifted Edge George Washington Dollar.

Read The Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
1944-S Steel Cent Sells For $373,750.00!


Images courtesy of Heritage Auctions

    August 12, 2008 -- Heritage Auctions, July 30-Aug. 3 American Numismatic Association convention sale in Baltimore: a zinc coated steel 1944-S cent graded NGC MS-66 sold for $373,750. It was called one of only two known examples. Just as copper alloy cents were struck in 1943 when they should have been zinc coated steel, there were several examples of zinc coated steel cents struck in 1944 when they should be been copper alloy.

Read More About It Here


In The News ...
Collector Finds Wyoming Doubled Dies


Image © Ken Potter 2007 / Coin courtesy of Andy Turnbull

    August 12, 2008 -- According to a Numismatic News story, Andy Turnbull of Pennsylvania sent in three different hub doubled die varieties on the reverse of the 2007-P Wyoming state quarter. All three varieties involve the lower portion of saddle horn where a secondary image of that design element can be seen to the south to a greater or lesser degree.

See The Rest The Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Clash Mark Common But Educational


Image © Ken Potter 2007 / Coin courtesy of Paul Guzewicz 

    August 06, 2008 -- This interesting 1922 Peace dollar came in that boasts what at first glance appears to be fairly prominent die break on the reverse to the right of the olive branch just below the word dollar. However, it is not a die break! According to Society of Silver Dollar Collectors, President, Ash Harrison and CONECA Silver Dollar Attributer, Michael S Fey,  this is a die clash.  Harrison said that this is, " ... one of many 1922's with that mark. It is a clash mark and quite common throughout the series. It would not be listed as a VAM solely on that mark."  So if you found one of these and thought it was a die break, now you know better.  Paul Guzewicz of Mass., submitted the coin in January 2007. Read more about die clashes here:  CONECA Glosssary


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Clash On 2007 Cent


Image © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Ray Mobley

    August 03, 2008 -- Ray Mobley of FL submitted the 2007 Clashed Die Lincoln cent shown here.  It shows best as a rectangular area below Lincoln’s ear. While most clashes are generally considered fairly minor they are interesting and fun to collect.  Read more about die clashes here:  CONECA Glosssary


In The News ...
Major Die Crack Reported on Proof Bald Eagle 50c


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Daniel Sanger

    August 01, 2008 -- According to an August 12 Numismatic News story, Daniel Sanger of Maryland has reported the first proof, non-circulating type commemorative coin with a major die crack.  He found it on a 2008-S Bald Eagle half dollar.  Other coins new to NN's continuing list of die cracks on proof coins are a 2005-S clad dime, a 2006-S clad Colorado state quarter and our first Spiked Head report for a 1999-S Kennedy half dollar.

See The Numismatic News Story Here

See More Spiked Head and Other Proof Die Cracks

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Bronze 1943-S 'Rediscovered'



Images courtesy of Numismatic Guarantee Corporation

    August 01, 2008 -- A previously unrecorded 1943-S Lincoln cent, erroneously struck on a bronze planchet and found in circulation over a half century ago, has been acquired by Rare Coin Wholesalers of Dana Point, California. The discovery coin now is certified as AU-53 by Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. "The coin was found in 1944 by architect Kenneth S. Wing Jr. of Long Beach, California who was assembling a set of Lincoln cents at the time," said Steven L. Contursi, President of Rare Coin Wholesalers (www.RCW1.com).
    Wing co-designed the terminal building for the Long Beach Municipal Airport in 1940 and the Long Beach Arena in the late 1950s.
    "When his heirs recently asked me to examine the coin, I doubted it was genuine. But then I got a magnet and was surprised when the coin did not stick to it. So, on behalf of Mr. Wing's heirs I submitted it for certification," Contursi explained. 
    "It's delightful and amazing there are still examples of great numismatic rarities to be 'discovered' and reported to the hobby." 
    A week after buying the coin, Contursi publicly displayed the 1943-S bronze cent at the American Numismatic Association World's Fair of Money® in Baltimore. To honor the memory of the coin's finder and the family that owned it for 64 years, he requested that NGC include the notation on the encapsulation insert label, "Kenneth S. Wing Jr. Coll."
    "The 1943 bronze Lincoln cent really transcends a wrong planchet error. Today, it's widely considered to be a classic twentieth century rarity, more kin to a transitional type, and now is collected as part of the regular series by devoted Lincoln cent enthusiasts," commented Dave Camire, President of Numismatic Conservation Services and a mint error consultant to NGC.
    "This piece is particularly important because it's from San Francisco, a scarcer mint for the issue compared to better-known Philadelphia Mint specimens. This coin is also a recent discovery to the numismatic community," Camire stated.
    Common zinc-coated steel cents will stick to a magnet but the handful of known 1943-dated Lincoln cents mistakenly struck in bronze (in this case, an alloy of 95 percent copper and 5 percent tin and zinc) will not. The zinc-coated steel metallic composition was used in 1943 to conserve copper that was needed for U.S. efforts in World War II.
    "When I purchased the coin I also received Mr. Wing's interesting file of correspondence dating back to 1946 as he tried to verify the coin's authenticity. Some of the responses he received from the Mint, the Smithsonian Institution and well-known dealer of the era, Abe Kosoff, may seem a little humorous today."
    In a letter to Wing dated August 20, 1946, Acting Director of the Mint Leland Howard wrote: "In reference to your letter of August 11th, there were no copper cents struck during the calendar year 1943 at any of the coinage Mints. Only the zinc coated steel cent was struck during that year."
Today, though, the hobby is aware of more than a dozen 1943 bronze cents with at least one example known from each of the Mints producing Lincoln cents that year: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco. 
Contursi acquired the coin and correspondence for $72,500. The letters from and to Wing indicate he tried for decades to get information about his historic, off-metal cent.
    Wing wrote to Encino, California dealer Kosoff on October 3, 1958: "In 1948, on a trip to San Francisco, it (the coin) was shown to the Director of the mint and his 'private' opinion was that of authenticity. In 1957, my Father was in Washington, DC, (sic) he attempted to have the Treasury Department examine it, however, they refused and referred him to the Smithsonian Institution."
In his response dated October 8, 1958, Kosoff replied: "It would be of prime importance to determine, beyond any doubt, that your 1943-S Cent is a genuine one. This would require a number of tests and the outlay of considerable cash."
    Additional correspondence regarding the coin's journey to Washington with Wing's father is a June 18, 1957 letter from V. Clain-Stefanelli, Curator of the Division of Numismatics at the Smithsonian in which he wrote: "The authenticity of this piece is in my opinion beyond doubt. In fact, as you certainly recall, Mr. Mendel L. Peterson, Acting Head Curator of the Department of History, fully concurred in this opinion."
    Contursi said his recently-acquired 1943 bronze Lincoln cent is quite special for him. "Of all the million dollar coins I've bought or sold - from Brasher Doubloons to the King of Siam set - this is the first 1943 'copper penny' I've ever owned!"
    For additional information, contact Rare Coin Wholesalers, P.O. Box 3873, Dana Point, CA 92629. Phone: (800) 347-3250. E-mail: RCWcoins@rcw1.com. Online: www.rcw1.com.

See The Numismatic News Story

See The CoinNews.Net Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Die Breaks, Clashes, Feeder Damage, etc., Featured


Image © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Fred Weinberg
A 2003-P Arkansas 25c with strike-through areas and feeder die-damage.


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Philip Buttermore
A deep strike-through on this 2008-P New Mexico 25c might be traced to feeder die-damage.

    August 01, 2008 -- Philip Buttermore of Pennsylvania sent in a very interesting strike-through error on a 2008-P New Mexico quarter. The strike-through is displayed on the obverse as a deep trench that runs diagonally from the central region of Washington's neck and through the word LIBERTY. One of the interesting characteristics of this coin is the pattern of parallel scrape marks that appear in the recesses of the strike-through.

See The Numismatic News Story

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions)..


In The News ...
Shifted Edge Lettering Washington $1 Found


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Mike Bozynski
Here you can see on the edge of the lower coin that the final 7 and P Mintmark are
obliterated by the edge scrape; the entire motto E PLURIBUS UNUM has been
skipped over completely and replaced with IN GOD WE TRUST which is
positioned closer to the date area than normal. The coin laying on
top is normal and shown for comparison.

    July 23, 2008 -- Long after most folks have given up searching the 2007-dated George Washington Presidential dollars for the well-known smooth-edge “Godless dollars” a few die-hards are still at it obtaining what BU rolls can still be had from banks and still finding errors. Numismatic News reports that one of those searchers is Mike Bozynski of Michigan who found a shifted edge inscription error.

See The Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with one for more photos and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Piazza Finds Two 1917/17 1c in Rolls


The above five images are of the higher grade example Piazza found.


Images courtesy of Bob Piazza
The above three images are of the lower grade example Piazza found.

    July 19, 2008 -- Have you ever had those days, weeks, or even months where it doesn't matter how much you search, you never find anything worth keeping? CONECA member, Bob Piazza, has had plenty of those days with over 40 years of searching. That all came to a halt when he found not one but two 1917 doubled dies (DDO-001, FS-01-1917-101 (013)) while searching two rolls of teen-dated Lincoln Cent rolls he had purchased for $4.00 each. According to Piazza, the majority of the coins in the rolls were either culls, or covered with grime. One coin, that was hardly identifiable as a cent caught his attention. He was about to throw it into the junk pile, when something told him to spend a bit of time on it, and after carefully removing the gunk around the date, he spotted the tell tale notching on the 9.
    "I was pretty excited because I knew exactly what I had" said Piazza. After spending nearly an hour cleaning it up, he had a nice specimen of the elusive variety. He posted some photos of his first find on the coppercoins forum to show other folks that things like this are still out there.
    About two hours later, he resumed his search of what was left of the two rolls. After going through a dozen or so, he placed a coin under his scope, only to find out he had found another one! This one didn't require any cleaning and it was a somewhat lower grade than the first, but there was little doubt that he had hit the jackpot again. "I was pretty much speechless. I knew the chances of finding one nice 91 year old scarce variety was slim, but to find two within a couple of hours, and from such a small sampling had to have astronomical odds."
    According to the Professional Coin Grading Service price guide, these varieties have skyrocketed in value recently with an EF-40 example selling for around $1900.00.  Piazza grades his two finds at EF-40 and VF-20. Not bad for a day of searching … not bad at all!
    Piazza is currently running for the CONECA Board and is an attributer for coppercoins.com.

Note:  While neither Piazza or any advanced numismatist encourages the cleaning of coins, there are rare instances of when cleaning is the only option available to find out what is under the dirt and grime that can sometimes build up on a coin and or to guarantee the continued safe storage of the coin.  In this case Piazza used a non-abrasive, non-acidic solvent that removed the dirt and grime because it was safe and his only option.  As a general rule, because cleaning usually reduces the value of a coin, (most often because it is done improperly),  it should be left to professionals or those with years of experience who know what to avoid and when and were the choice to clean is appropriate.  If you're not 100% sure -- don't do it!


In The News ...
Finding Errors In Circulation Change


Images © Ken Potter 2007 / Coin courtesy of Brian Higgins

    July 12, 2008 -- While many cherry-pickers of modern coins often restrict their search to brilliant uncirculated rolls of current coins, looking for doubled dies and other varieties, Brian Higgins of Naples, Fla., is one of those folks who doesn't hesitate to sit down and search good old-fashioned circulated coins. He has a penchant for Jefferson nickels and his luck is pretty good as we can see by some of the Jefferson nickel errors that he sent in.
    Probably his neatest coin is a 1996-D Jefferson nickel that was double struck. In this case, it was struck normally for the first strike and then it re-entered the collar for a second strike with very wide rotation between strikes.

See The Online Version Of This Numismatic News Article

See the July 22 issue of Numismatic News for the fully illustrated version of this story.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Collecting Die Progressions For Fun


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Chuck Chichinski

    July 10, 2008 -- Most collectors ignore the proliferation of typical die cracks, die chips and small die breaks found on modern coins because they rarely carry any numismatic value. However, searching them out and assembling them into what collectors call "Progression Sets" can be fun and educational.  Chuck Chichinski of Ohio recently went through some uncirculated rolls of 2008 cents finding a progression of interesting cracks on a series of coins all struck from the same die pair. His progression starts with two or three very faint die cracks that eventually develop die chips and at the end, a neat looking small die break.

See The Rest Of Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Die Dent On 2006-D SD 25c Featured


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of James Rather

    July 08, 2008 -- A 2006-D South Dakota State quarter featuring a die dent (or the closely related die gouge) above the D of DOLLAR, was one of several varieties featured in the Varieties Notebook column published in the July 7, 2008 issue of Coin World. The coin was submitted by James Rather of TX.  While die dents and gouges are generally considered minor varieties (or errors) they are still interesting and fun to collect especially when they get big enough to see with the naked eye like this one.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with one or more photos and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Liberty Enjoys A Puff Now And Then



The red arrow points to the cigar shaped die aberration.


A closer look at the "cigar."  Note the tip of the "cigar" is separated by a scratch on the coin. This is not a diagnostic for the variety. A closer view shows us some die breakage or die damage above and below the "cigar."  Is it related to the "cigar?"


Images © Ken Potter 2008 / Coins courtesy of Saverio Barbieri
A look at a second specimen shows the same "markers" above and below the "cigar."

    July 05, 2008 -- For over eight years, Numismatic News reader, Saverio Barbieri has been searching for 1857 Liberty Seated quarters featuring a "Smoking Miss Liberty." On the variety he seeks, even under low magnification, it appears that she is relaxing with a cigar held between the forefingers of her right hand. It seems so unmistakable that Barbieri is convinced that the "cigar" may have been cut into the die in jest by an engraver or other workman inside the Mint on a slow day when they had nothing better to do.  What are the other possibilities?  See the rest of the story in the July 8, 2008 issue of Numismatic News.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster (please -- only email submissions).


YN News ...
Young Numismatist Finds Madison Dollar Error!

    June 25, 2008 -- Young Numismatist, Nadine Hall, has found a 2008-D James Madison dollar that is missing the obverse clad layer.  The 12-year-old discovered it while helping her mother search through Presidential dollar rolls.  This is the second missing clad layer Presidential dollar reported on the CONECA homepage in just over a month that involved young numismatists.  The first one reported was found on a John Quincy Adams dollar as reported in a story further down this page.  It is extremely gratifying to see our youth getting involved with coins.  The full story on Hall's find will be in a future CONECA Errorscope. Congratulations Nadine!


Members  Share ...
Error Jefferson In Mint Set
by Mike Diamond


Click On image For enlarged view


Images courtesy of Mike Diamond

    June 21, 2008 -- This 1972-D mint set contains a nickel with an unusual error. It's an in-collar double-strike with no rotation between strikes and with a low-pressure brockage and indent on the second strike. The only evidence of the second strike seen on the reverse is some subtle smearing of the door of Monticello. There is a slight partial collar next to the brockage.
    Evidently something prevented the dies from approximating normally during the second strike, so that they were too far apart at their closest approach to leave a deeply recessed partial brockage and indent. There is no evidence that the obverse die contacted the coin's surface during the second strike in the area not covered by the intrusive coin and planchet.
    From 1968 to 1974, the Denver Mint produced a fair number of low-pressure brockages, mostly on nickels and dimes. This is the first I've seen in a Mint Set, and the first I've seen with a partial brockage and an indent on the same coin.


In The News ...
WV Proof 25c: Burning Bridge? Or ...?


Image © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Todd Bucholdt

    June 18, 2008 -- This week's, Collectors' Clearinghouse column in Coin World features a 2005-S Silver proof State quarter on which it appears that the bridge over New River Gorge is on fire.  It is explained as being the result of improper die polishing. Another example of the effect is shown on the obverse of a 1994-S Proof Lincoln cent.  Other coins featured, include "Struck Through Grease" errors on a 2002 Louisiana State quarter and a 1991-P Kennedy half dollar.  A 1996 American Silver Eagle bullion coin presents mysterious raised areas on the obverse that are examined by a panel of experts with mixed opinions along with a call for CW readers to help solve the mystery by reporting any others that may be found.  More details can be found in the June 30 issue of CW now being mailed to shops and subscribers and accessible via the online version.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Pope Finds Possible New 3-Legged Buffalo


Images courtesy of Ron Pope

    June 18, 2008 -- Longtime CONECA member Ron Pope wrote  to say:  "This is a 1916 Philadelphia Mint coin and I think it's weak enough to call a legitimate 3 legged variety. Don't know yet whether it's due to a filled die or an abraded die so, collectively, the more of this one we can find the easier that question may be to answer. I've sent it to Bill Fivaz for his opinion and hopeful inclusion in the next Cherrypickers' Guide."
    For those of you who enjoy abraded die varieties on Buffalos, watch for this one so that we can help Ron nail it down to the exact cause!  He can be reached at coinquest_sixtyone@yahoo.com. He is the author of the excellent book, Buffalo Nickels - The Abraded Die Varieties, which contains a special section on all the 1914/3 overdates.


In The News ...
Doubled Die Found On Felix Schlag Medal


Image © Ken Potter 2008

    June 16, 2008 -- The subject piece is interesting in that it has numismatic ties to US coinage; Franklin Mint medals and Masonic collectables. It’s a Paul Revere medal struck by the Franklin Mint in 1967 for the International Fraternal Commemorative Society. The society issued a 50-piece set of 39 mm sterling silver medals honoring famous Freemasons in a limited edition of 1,293 sets. The Revere medal contains an obverse doubled die that I would have completely missed it wasn’t for collector/researcher Dave Andreas who expressed an interest in any medals designed by Felix Oscar Schlag of Owosso, MI (1891-1974). On his list of medals were two pieces that I had in stock including our subject piece. Quite frankly, I wouldn’t have given this medal a second look if it weren’t for Adreas pointing out the fact that Schlag, designer of the Jefferson nickel, had created it.

See Details And More Images Here


Recent Finds ...
Neff Reports On Neat 1992 Dbl Eyelid 1c


Image courtesy of BJ Neff

    June 14, 2008 --  According to BJ  Neff, "An unusual doubled eyelid has been confirmed by Dr. James Wiles and listed in the CONECA files (which Wiles oversees) as 1992 Lincoln cent, DDO-001, I-O-VIII. While doubled eyelids were more common on the wheat cent, this is the first to show this type doubling in this era. This doubled die was brought to my attention by John Knabe."   Wiles said, "The white arrows point to the major doubling.  The rotation of the secondary image caused me to list it as a  Class VIII, rather than a Class IV."  According to Neff, the variety has also been listed by all other attributers that he is aware of seeing it so far.  Nice find John!  KP


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Wrong Planchet JFK!


Images courtesy of RHM


In the two images above we can see the stretching of letters and digits closest to the rim due to metal flow of the undersize planchet attempting to fill the collar under the pressure of the strike.


A look at the edge of the coin reveals a copper core typical of clad planchets.

    June 13, 2008 -- RHM of PA reports one of the nicer finds that has come in recently. On May 30 he said:  "I found this 1980-P Kennedy half in a roll yesterday and I think it might be a wrong planchet error but I'm not sure. There is only a slight trace of reeding on the edge and the condition is probably about uncirculated (AU). It's also smaller in diameter and a little thinner than a normal Kennedy half. I don't have the proper equipment to weigh it.  Any help in identifying it would be greatly appreciated!" 
    On June 13, he was finally able to weight the coin confirming my suspicion that it was struck on an SBA planchet!

See The Full Numismatic News Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Another Lettered-Edge $1 Planchet Found in Monroe Roll


Images courtesy of Jim Landers
Here you can see the weak lettering on the edge of Landers' planchet

    June 09, 2008 -- Jim Landers of NY wrote to tell us about finding a 2008-P Presidential dollar planchet with edge lettering while searching through a batch of James Monroe dollars.  He was looking for the errors struck on a quarter planchets that the Mint acknowledged producing some time back (scroll down to see related story) but found this instead. He said, " I bought a few thousand dollars worth two months ago and searched all but six rolls then stopped because life got busy and I was getting tired of the search. Well, on Thursday June 5, I opened the first of those six rolls and out popped the blank in the middle of the roll. Needless to say I ripped through the remaining rolls but found no additional errors. I was wondering how to get the coin graded as a Monroe blank planchet with edge lettering and where to get the coin graded. I live in upstate New York and bought the coins from several local banks." 
    Landers' find is fantastic in that very few edge lettered planchets have actually been verified to date (scroll down for the related story).  However, once the Mint has issues a second Presidential business strike dollar for any year it becomes impossible to distinguish which dollar a planchet was intended for since it could have been for either the first or the second issued (or any minted thereafter).  As such only those lettered edge planchets found for the first president issued for any year that are submitted before the release of the second Presidential dollar is issued will be designated to a specific president.  After that they are attributed simply for the date and Mint.  This is possible because the date and the Mintmark are on the edge of the coin.

See The NCG Story: "Presidential $1 Error Coins: James Monroe" for more info on how they attribute lettered edge planchets


Recent Finds ...
Cherrypicker Finds 1992-D Close AM 1c In Roll


Images courtesy of Dave Olsowy

    June 08, 2008 -- Dave Olsowy of Michigan reports finding a 1992-D Lincoln cent with the Close AM reverse.  He said he found it on June 7 while looking through some rolls of cents that he obtained from a bank in Houghton Lake, MI.  It came from a BRINKS box with the cents rolled in the plastic wrappers.
    "Close AM" and "Wide A"' refers to the two reverse design styles known for the 1992, 1992-D, 1998, 1998-S, 1999, 1999-S and 2000 cents.  The two varieties exhibit several distinct differences from each other. The most significant are in the AM of AMERICA where the A and M are either very close to virtually touching each other or wide apart. The Close AM variety also exhibits Frank Gasparro's designer initials, FG, far from the right side of the Memorial building while the FG on the Wide AM variety is close to the building.  The 1992, 1992-D and 1998-S Close AM varieties are rare to exceedingly rare.  The 1999 and 1999-S are very scarce to rare (with the 1999 perhaps tougher than the 1999-S) while the 1998 and 2000 are relatively common in circulated grades but scarce in brilliant uncirculated grades (with the 1998b several times scarcer than the 2000 in BU grades).  I'd  guess that Olsowy's find is worth in excess of $1000 even in circulated grade.  Only a small handful of this date are known with the Close AM.

Learn More About Lincoln Memorial Cent Transitional Designs Here


Recent Finds ...
Normal Appearing Coin Turns Out Laminated


Image courtesy of Tom Mathews

    June 09, 2008 -- Tom Mathews wrote to say: "I'm not sure if you'd like to use this for the CONECA website, but here is the story. I collect die varieties. Jose' Cortez has been great help to me doing so, and in February I met him in Las Vegas for a coin show. We got together along with another guy, Mike Pezak, who carves hobo nickels. To make a long story short, I started carving hobo nickels. I was carving this 1936 nickel yesterday when I hit a place above the brim of the hat where a chunk of the planchet popped out. I had planned on doing a copper inlay for the hatband, so that was no problem until I started digging a little deeper. The missing piece of the planchet kept getting larger as I went deeper with the cuts. Finally, I pulled up what I can only call a deep lamination. The coin had no indication of this lamination before I started carving it into a hobo nickel, so I though it was kind of a neat piece. Laminations aren't always obvious!"


In The News ...
Not All "Cheerios" Dollars Valuable


This is a look at the rare Reverse of 1999 with enhanced feather detail.
Images Courtesy of Mark Goodman


This is a look at the normal tail feathers on the common Rev. of 2000 variety.

    May 27, 2008 -- In 1999 the U.S. Mint came to an agreement with General Mills to randomly distribute 5,500 specially-packaged 2000-dated Sacagawea Dollars among 10 million boxes of Cheerios cereal to promote the new coins. Five years later, it was discovered that at least some of the so-called “Cheerios” dollars were actually from a different reverse die style featuring enhancements in design detail.  These became known as the Reverse of 1999 while the normal variety that followed was called the Reverse of 2000.  Many observers assumed that all of the Cheerios dollars were of the Reverse of 1999 but such was not the case.  At least three grading services including PCI, Numismatic Guarantee Corporation and the Professional Coin Grading Service have reported Reverse of 2000 dollars found in these packages.  PCGS is the latest to issue this warning posted on their homepage on May 16 and again in the PCGS Library on May 27.   If you've purchased one of these coins for a hefty premium without removing it from the original packaging, (in which the reverse cannot be viewed), you may have made one gigantic mistake.

See The PCGS Story

See Mike Wallace's  Small Dollar Site Article On The Cheerios Rev.'99 Dollars

See Mike Wallace's  Small Dollar Site Article On The Cheerios Rev.'00 Dollars


In The News ...
Searcher Finds 1968 DDO 10c In Mint Set


Image © Ken Potter 2008

    May 24, 2008 -- Susan Stewart of Virginia shows us that there are still some very nice doubled dies out there to be found by diligent searchers.  She found a 1968 Roosevelt dime boasting a very nice doubled die obverse. It is listed by CONECA as DDO-001 – 1-O-V-CCW  (Doubled Die Obverse #1).  More images of doubling in other areas of the coin can be seen on page 42 of  the June 2 issue of Coin World now being delivered or accessible to subscribers from the online version by going here: Coin World.

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Mint Still Delivering AE '07 Reverse $1s


Image Courtesy of NGC
The style of 2007 with serif-less lower U and pointed lower right vertical of the N.

    May 24,  2008 -- According to a page 4 story in the June 2 issue of Coin World by CW Staffer, Paul Gilkes, "As of the middle of May, Coin World continued to receive a handful of reports from collectors saying they had received the Reverse of 2007 coins from orders placed one or more days before."  This suggests that the errors may be mixed in with inventories struck later and might continue to dribble out of the Mint over a period of time.  Earlier, the Mint estimated that approximately 47,000 of the 2008-W Silver Eagles with the special burnished finish were sold to collectors struck with the Reverse of 2007.  According to Mint spokesman, Michael White, the Mint was unaware of using the 2007 reverse on any of the 2008 Eagles until being advised of it by CW.  White suggested that the 47,000 pieces minted of the variety represented about three shifts of  production at the West Point facility.  According to CW's latest estimates of selling prices the coins have advance shapely in value. In the May 12 issue, CW reported prices on the secondary market as ranging from about $99 for certified MS69 examples to about $400 for certified MS70s.  The current market pegs them at $300 to $700 for the same certified grades according to CW.  Scroll down for more stories on this variety.


In The News ...
John Q Missing Clad Layer Found In Roll!


Image © Ken Potter 2008
Click Image For Enlarged View

    May 23, 2008 -- An Ohio trio, Richard Stachurski and his grandsons Zak and Joe El khamiri, has found what may be the first Missing Clad Layer error reported on a 2008-P John Quincy Adams Presidential dollar. According to Stachurski, he and his grandsons routinely search Presidential dollars for errors with each of the boys assigned different tasks based on age. Four-year-old Joe is assigned the task of clearing away the wrappers from which the coins are quickly removed by 8-year-old Zak who passes them on to Stachurski, who does the actual searching.

See The Rest Of The Numismatic News Story  

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebmaster  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Roll Search Yields Cud Cent


Photo courtesy of Charlie Fantasia

    May 09, 2008 -- Charlie Fantasia, found the above shown 1983 Lincoln cent with a Major Die Break Reverse (Cud) while searching rolls of cents from his local bank.  It is one of seven reverse cuds listed for the date and denomination by Sam Thurman and Arnold Margolis between their 1997 edition of The Cud Book and their 2001 The Cud Book Supplement.  It is listed by Thurman and Margolis as LC-83-49R.  Nice find!


In The News ...
Mint Estimates 47,000 AE '07 Reverse Type

    May 05,  2008 -- According to a front page story in the May 12 issue of Coin World, the Mint estimated that approximately 47,000 of the 2008-W Silver Eagles with the special burnished finish were sold to collectors struck with the Reverse of 2007.  According to Mint spokesman, Michael White, the Mint was unaware of using the 2007 reverse on any of the 2008 Eagles until being advised of it by CW.  CW was first notified of the existence of the variety by Georgia collector, John Nanny, who advised them of the find on April 15 after making note of it the day before.  Apparently, Nanny is the first person on record so far to have noted the variety, preceding the NGC observations by about two days.  White suggested that the 47,000 pieces minted of the variety represented about three shifts of  production at the West Point facility.  According to CW, prices of the Rev of '07 variety on the secondary market have been ranging from about $99 for certified MS69 examples to about $400 for certified MS70s.


In The News ...
NGC Confirms Major Hub Variety
For 2008-W Silver Eagles


The style of 2007 with serif-less lower U and pointed lower right vertical of the N.


The style of 2008 with large lower serif of U and broad based foot of right vertical of the N.
Also note the spacing differences between the N and I.


Images Courtesy of NGC

    May 03, 2008 -- Numismatic Guarantee Corporation of Sarasota, FL has revealed the discovery of two different major hub design varieties of the reverse of the 2008-W Burnished Silver Eagle.  The differences involve the design style apparently last intended for 2007 production found on 2008 dated pieces and a new hub design introduced in 2008. Early reports suggest, that for the most part, the 2008-W Eagles boast the new enhanced style reverse or what is being referred to as the "Reverse of 2008."  The scarcer "transitionals" are being referred to as bearing the "Reverse of 2007."  The variations are many involving differences in the style of characters, the size and spacing of the stars above the eagle, the distance of characters from the rim and from each other, the style of the tilde that separates the word SILVER from the word ONE and perhaps the most easily spotted differences between the styles of UN of UNITED.

See the NGC Story Here

See The PCGS Story Here


"Oh, No It Ain't ...!"
"Oh, Yes It Is ...!"
by Ken Potter -- NLG

Photos © Ken Potter 2008


Hub doubling of lower letters of DIME.


Hub doubling on tops of ERIC of AMERICA.


Hub doubling of NUM of UNUM and lower oak leaves.


RPM#4 S/S/S NW & NE

    May 03, 2008 -- Everybody makes mistakes and the major grading services are no exception.  Here is a 1946-S Roosevelt dime that I originally sold to one of my customers properly attributed on the holder that I shipped it to him in as Doubled Die  Reverse #5 (5-R-II-C) - RPM#4 S/S/S NW & NE.
    When the buyer submitted the coin to one of the major third party grading services he was surprised when it came back attributed generically for the RPM as a simple S/S (with no designation that it was a triple S and no RPM number assigned) along with a packaging slip that stated that it did not contain a doubled die reverse. Of course this placed me in a bad light as the submitter came back casting a suspicious eye on the attribution I had made and it had to make him wonder about other coins I had sold him as doubled dies that he had not yet certified.
    After assuring him that what he purchased was indeed a genuine and listed doubled die I asked to have it returned so that the issue could be resolved by me personally.  The coin is highlighted above in the images of the doubled die and repunched mintmark that are present on this coin.  While lighter doubling can be found in other areas, the strongest doubling evident is on ERICA of AMERICA, DIME, NUM of UNUM and the right oak leaves above.  It's not a monster doubled die but it is an obvious one to anybody who knows how to examine a coin for a doubled die and normally should be easily spotted.  However in all fairness to the attributer it should be pointed out that it is one of those doubled dies where much of the doubling doesn't jump out at you unless it is viewed up-side-down.  The tripling of the Mintmark is obvious!  So what happened?  Your guess is as good as mine but it is clear that they fumbled the ball on this one not just on the doubled die but also on the status of the RPM!  The lesson here is that mistakes can happen and if you are convinced you are correct then a second opinion from a specialist such as a CONECA Examiner/Attributer may be in order.
    The listing for this coin can be found in Richard's Roosevelt Dime Review -- The Silver Years on page 70 (more info on the book's availability can be had  from Richard Bateson at P.O. Box 86, Grand Blanc, MI 48439-0086 by sending a SASE) .  Free-access to an enhanced online version of Richard Bateson's  book can  be found here:  http://www.richardsrooseveltreview.net


In The News ...
Second 1982 Doubled Die Reverse Cent Uncovered!


Doubling of E PLURIBUS UNUM is very strong.


Another area of very strong doubling is on ONE of ONE CENT.


Photos © Ken Potter 2008/Coin courtesy of Jim Proctor
Doubling of the Lincoln Statue is quite pronounced!

    February 15, 2008 -- After nearly four months of readers searching, a second example of a major 1982 doubled die reverse cent has finally been uncovered. Numismatic News reader Jim Proctor of Vermont reported it.  It bears the small date obverse and is struck on a pure copper-plated zinc core planchet - as was the original find.

See The Rest Of The Numismatic News Story Here

See Larger More Detailed Images Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Members  Share ...
Cracked Up Indian Highlighted


Image courtesy of Mike Diamond

    May 31,  2008 -- CONECA President, Mike Diamond send in a neat one.  He said: "I thought you might like to post this on the CONECA website. This 1864 Indian cent shows a network of die cracks, most of them bi-level. I suppose some might call it a shattered die. Interesting looking whatever you call it. This is the third cent I've come across struck by this particular die."  Neat one Mike!  Anybody else got something to share?


Members Share ...
Diamond Describes Neat Error Pair

    April 09, 2008 -- CONECA President, Mike Diamond sent in a couple neat errors to show us all.  He describes the first one (above) as "A heavily worn, double-struck Buffalo nickel.  The first strike was normal while the second strike was slightly off-center.  Both strikes show the same clash marks.  That would seem to support its authenticity, as does the pattern of overlap between first and second strikes."  


Images/coins courtesy of Mike Diamond

    Second we have a wheatback cent struck through a split, capped die.  The die cap left a late-stage brockage of the reverse design on the obverse face.  The ridge fades out in the center where it joins a poorly defined swelling.  It's probably a zone of die subsidence (sunken die), but it could represent an interior die break or a retained interior die break.  Neat Mike!  Keep 'em coming!


Recent Finds ...
1964-D Off Center Found In Jar


Images courtesy of Joe Thompson

    May 24, 2008 -- Joe Thompson of Phoenix, AZ reports: "I was doing some cleaning and found a jar of coins in one of the closets. I found this inside (referring to the Off Center struck Jefferson five-cent piece above).  Off Center strikes are created when a feeder mechanism fails to deposit a blank or planchet perfectly centered within the striking area.  Now why can't I get that lucky! KP


Recent Finds ...
Third
Double-Struck Madison $1 Reported In Mint Set


Click On Image For Enlarged View


Images courtesy of Ben Onorato
Click On Image For Enlarged View
The Arrows Point To Some Of The More Obvious Areas Of Doubling

    May 24, 2008 -- In reference to the "In Collar Double Strike" Madison dollar that was reported to us several weeks ago, Ben Onorato followed up by saying, that he had read the article on the CONECA website about the error than Jeff Makkos of Ohio found back in March.  "Well, I found one myself about a month ago in an eight-coin P&D Presidential Mint Set while cherrypicking for high grade satin coins for my PCGS Registry Set. Boy was I surprised! At first I thought it was an impression from the coin transferred onto the plastic protecting the coin" said Onorato.  He took the liberty of enclosing some nice photos of his coin so that we could follow up.  He sent the coin into PCGS for attribution and grading. Nice find Ben!
    This is the third one reported to us so far on 2007-P Madison dollar taken from an eight-coin Presidential Mint Set! (We were supplied with no photos of the second one so it remains unconfirmed.)  In our March report on the first one we suggested that there was a possibility that more might exist if certain conditions were present during the striking process. So far we have at least two and possibly three with none reported for any of the other Presidential dollars or Mints. Is anybody else finding them?  Scroll down several stories to read about the Makkos find for more details on the error type, possible causes, estimates of value, etc.


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Double Struck Dollar Error
In Gov. Issued Mint Set!

by Ken Potter - NLG
All Photos by Jeff Makkos

    April 07, 2008 -- Jeff Makkos of Ohio reports finding a Double Struck 2007-P James Madison dollar in a government issued Mint Set.  The type of double strike involved is what errorists refer to as an In-Collar Double Strike with Rotation Between Strikes. The cause may be due to two different scenarios.  The first possibility is that the coin was first struck normally and then reentered the coining area falling back into or over the collar where it was forced back in by a second strike in a position rotated just a few degrees away from the original strike.  Another possibility suggested by CONECA president Mike Diamond, is that coin remained in the collar while the inner sleeve of the collar broke loose and rotated within the collar resulting in the same effect.  Because a coin normally expands in diameter ever so slightly upon ejection it is often difficult for it to completely reenter the collar.   Makkos' coin does not show a partial collar indicating that it was either forced all the way back in during the second strike or could have been in a rotating collar.    

        Makkos found it in a 2007 United States Mint Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set that contains the four 2007 Presidential dollars issued by Philadelphia, one 2007 Sacagawea dollar from Denver and a West Point minted 2007 Silver Eagle.  All are of the special matte or satin finish that are only issued to collectors in Mint Sets.  An image of what the set looks like is at the end of this article.  We will elaborate more on this coin as specialists weigh in on its value, etc. KP

See Additional Images & Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Wild Clash In Roll From eBay!


Photo © Ken Potter 2008/Coin courtesy of Philip Wood

    March 17, 2008 -- Philip Wood of North Carolina reports finding a very nice higher-grade circulated example of a clashed die on a 1931-S “Buffalo” five-cent piece that he found in a roll he recently purchased on eBay.   He said that it was unattributed for the variety and he just happened to notice it while looking over the lot.  It also shows strong clash marks from the Bison’s shoulder impressed between the Indian’s neck and lower feathers (not shown here).  Nice find Philip!


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds "Coarse" Lettering Monroe $1s


Photo courtesy of Gordon Barnes

    March 10, 2008 -- Gordon Barnes of MA reports finding 2008-P James Monroe dollars with edge lettering that appears crisp and clear (or what one would consider normal) on some coins while others display "coarse" lettering with some doubling.  Out of 6000 pieces searched he found 550 with the "coarse" edge inscriptions.  The "coarse" lettering effect was seen on some 2007-P Adams dollars too and were referred to as "Large Font" by some finders.  Research is still being conducted on what might be the cause of this effect.  Barnes also found examples with the lettering ranging from up high on the rim, centered on the rim and down low.  This effect has been seen on all the preceding dollars.


Recent Finds ...
Michigander Finds Lettered Edge Monroe Dollar Planchet!


Image courtesy of Numismatic Guarantee Corporation


Image courtesy of Garrett Reich

     March 04, 2008 --  (Revised March 06 to add new information) Garrett Reich of Michigan has reported a 2008-P Presidential dollar planchet found in a $1000 box of James Monroe Presidential dollars. While the edge is inscribed with the mottos, IN GOD WE TRUST and E PLURIBUS UNUM, the date and mintmark; the planchet itself managed to avoid the striking process and is sans the obverse and reverse designs.   It is one of just a handful of edge lettered planchets known for the entire series of Presidential dollars minted so far and it's the first one reported to me on a 2008 issue.  Reich reported it to me several days prior to the official February 14 release date for the Monroe dollars asking for advise as to whether or not I knew if any of the grading services would designate it as a Monroe dollar planchet on their holders.  He eventually sent it to Numismatic Guarantee Corporation (NGC) of Sarasota, Fl., who certified it as: "2008-P (James Monroe) Edge Lettered Planchet."  See the Numismatic News Story Here.
    According to a March 13, 2007 Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) press release, Ray and Mary Smith of Fort Collins, Colorado were the first to submit a lettered edge planchet for a 2007 Presidential dollar planchet with a lettered edge found in one of two 25-coin rolls of Denver minted George Washington Presidential dollars obtained from a local bank.  Because it was found prior to any other Presidential dollars types being released for 2007, it was designated as a Washington dollar planchet in a like manner to the lettered edge Monroe dollar certified for Reich. According to the Smith's who kept an eye on events surrounding the error type, they were aware of several other 2007 edge lettered dollar planchets that were found after theirs and certified by NGC.
  
    Scott Schechter, NGC's Director of Marketing stated in a March 6 email on the subject: "We’ve graded at least a half dozen lettered edge (and partially lettered edge) blanks. As soon as the second coin of the year comes out, we will no longer put a name on the label, and I think that we’ve only done three Monroe blanks so far. Unlettered blanks are common, and, since they are the same as the Sacagawea blanks, we have done many hundreds. Dave Camire commented to me that he feels that the frequency of blanks coming out for Presidential dollar coins is higher than for Sacagawea dollars years ago." A George Washington dollar lettered edge planchet that was certified after the Smith's had theirs certified can be found on the NGC website by going here: Presidential $1 Error Coins: George Washington.
    
    March 06, 2008 --
Update!  It has been learned that an additional specimen of a 2008-P James Monroe dollar planchet with edge lettering has been reported by Ken Sigler of Cinnaminson Rare Coins, Cinnaminson, NJ.  He found it while searching through rolls of the dollars on February 18.  A story on his find by Paul Gilkes can be found on page 4 of the March 17 issue of Coin World.  It is now available for viewing to subscribers of the online version of CW.  According to the story, Sigler was planning to send it to PCGS.  This would be one of four specimens publicly reported so far assuming Sigler did not change his mind and send it to NGC and is is a part of their count.  As of the time of this posting it is not known how many lettered edge dollar planchets have been certified by PCGS.  We will update as we learn more.

See the Numismatic News Story Here


In The News ...
2000 'Extra Beard' Attribution Reversed!


Photos © Ken Potter 2008/Coin courtesy of James P. McCarthy


Click one the image above to see Neff's analysis of this MAD Clash

Overlay created courtesy of B.J. Neff

    February 28, 2008 -- (Revised to add more information March 05, 2008) A number of researchers who attributed a 2000 Lincoln cent as a doubled die obverse with an "extra beard"  just weeks ago have unanimously reversed their opinions of it being attributed as such and have reattributed it as a clashed die (with most or all suggesting it is a clash from misaligned dies or what is often referred to as a MAD Clash).  Researchers who originally suggested that the coin was a doubled die based their opinions on the fact that overlays seemed to neatly fit the area of the so-called extra beard into another area of the beard.   However, soon after the variety was first publicized, folks started finding more examples with a so-called extra beard doubled die from other dies with obvious clash marks.  So many were found with clash marks that a clash had to be considered as a possible cause. A closer look at examples struck from the same dies as the original find also showed traces of clash but they were minor and overlooked as trivial.  Several hobby specialists created overlays of what a clash might look like, and overlays with the dies a bit misaligned started to look like the answer.  Researcher, Ken Potter created preliminary overlays from images of a 2005-D Lincoln cent he borrowed from the US Mint's website and after a bit of playing around was able to recreate what appeared to approximately illustrate how the obverse and reverse dies were lined up when they clashed. Potter said, "You have to look closely and visualize where the field areas at the edges of the columns and around the Lincoln statue in the Memorial building are to piece it together mentally.  Another CONECA researcher, B.J. Neff fine-tuned overlays that he created and are shown above.  His entire account with a detailed analysis complete with photomicrographic overlays with arrows of the areas in question can be accessed via the link at the end of this article. CONECA member-researcher, Billy Crawford, also created extensive overlays along with an extensive account of what created this aberration and others that are similar.  The link to his work is also at the end of this article.
     The fact that attributers all agreed "too quickly" on this being a doubled die was definitely a part of the problem of it being misattributed by so many so quickly.  The fact that the "doubling" seemed to "fit" into the design was an even bigger part of the problem.  It is a lesson that reaffirms what many researchers already know, which is that overlays that "fit" do not always necessarily confirm a variety even when they seem to do so at first glance."     


Photo © Ken Potter 2008 / Coin courtesy of Susan Headley
Above is an example of a 2000 Lincoln Cent with a "normal" clash die sent in by Susan Headley of www.coins.about.com. Here we see the rectangular shaped area (from a bay of the Memorial building on the reverse) pointed out by the red arrows below the ear.  This is the typical area to see this aberration on many recent date Lincolns with clashed dies.  The so-called extra beard is also present on this specimen but much lower than on the MAD Clash version.  They are pointed out by the yellow arrows.  The uppermost red arrow points to yet another clash mark. Interestingly, clash marks of the character pointed out by the yellow arrows have not yet been reported to us on other dates, which may be one of the reasons they were not noticed on the series until recently.  We will report further as we learn more so stay tuned in!

    Attributers who have de-listed the 2000 Lincoln cent variety shown above as being a doubled die include, John Wexler, James Wiles (CONECA), Ken Potter, Billy Crawford and Bob Piazza (of www.CopperCoins.com).  Credit should be given to all of the attributers involved in the research of this coin for nipping this misattribution in the bud before it became firmly entrenched into the hobby as a doubled die.
    With all this said, it is interesting to note that the reevaluation of the variety from a doubled die to a MAD Clash has not particularly destroyed its stature as a collectable.  A MAD Clash is a rather elusive class of variety in itself and we expect that collectors will continue to look for these and collect them.

Read B. J. Neff's In-Depth Analysis On The Topic Here

Read Billy Crawford's Excellent Update On The Variety Here (Tip:  Right click and save this document to your hard drive or a disc if you want to read it later as Crawford's Die Variety News' issues are not held permanently on the web as they are replaced with newer issues.

Note: A very educational article on this subject by John Wexler can also be found on pages 23-25 of the March 31 issue of Coin World. 


Recent Finds ...
Vintage "Atheist Cud" Found In Roll!



Photos by Eric Zabel

    March 03, 2008 -- Eric Zabel reports finding a neat Major Die Break "Cud" while searching through rolls of circulated cents.  He said "I found this penny in a roll that I got from the bank. I buy $25.00 at a time and search them. It's a 1972-D with a cud and I was happy to find it. But then I took out my magnifier and saw that it had columns on the obverse side of the coin."  The columns are the result off a severe die clash which undoubtedly contributed to the die breaking.  Cuds which obliterate part of or all of the word "GOD" are often referred to as Atheist Cuds by collectors.  Read more about cuds and clashes by going to the CONECA Glossary, Recent Finds Archive or the Error-Variety Articles Index page.

Recent Finds ...
Beginner's Luck Nets Duo UT 25c Error

    March 01, 2008 -- Joy Murphy and Vince Viren of IL recently found a neat "Dropped Digit" on a 2007-D Utah State quarter.  According to Murphy: "I am a new error collector and member of CONECA. I was explaining my new hobby to my brother and we were looking through pocket change and found this Utah error quarter. As a beginner, I don't even know what some of the terms actually mean, but I am learning every day."  It was Authenticated by ANACS who attributed is as follows: 2007-D 25C UT STRK THRU DROPPED DIGIT - INCUSE '6' ON REV and graded MS 64.

    The "Dropped Design" is a relatively scarce error type with its origins in the common "Filled Die" error. When debris, (often referred to by error collectors as "mint goop" or "grease"), clog a die, it may after a few strikes, become compressed within cavities of the die such as numerals or letters or other design elements.  Even after the offending material has been dispersed from the field of the die through striking coins, it may remain intact within these recesses.  More "Dropped Design" errors can be found by searching the Recent Finds archive.


Recent Finds ...
  Clashed Dies Found On  Okalahoma Launch Coins!


Photos courtesy of Thea Slavin/Coin courtesy of American Precious Metals Exchange


Click On Image For Larger View

Here is an overlay created in Photoshop that illustrates where
the clash marks originated from. 

    February 12, 2007 (Revised Feb 15 to include additional information) -- Benjamin Swagerty reports the following: "At the Oklahoma City launch for the new Oklahoma quarter, a set in a plastic case was made available with both a P and a D mint quarter. Back at the shop, we noticed problems with several of the P mint quarters. Our staff photographer was able to use our microscope to take images of die clashing. We do not know if you are already aware of these or not, but we thought you might be interested in the photos for your column. They were discovered by Nathan Owens and photographed by Thea Slavin. We are all employees of American Precious Metals Exchange."  It should be noted that Swagerty sent three different images of what appeared to be three clashed die varieties or stages thereof.  The one shown above is the strongest of the three.

    It is interesting to see in Slavin's photo clashed die elements from obverse-to-reverse that we've seen on other clashed State quarter designs.  For example, the so-called "leaping fish" clash die mark seen on the reverse of many 2005 Minnesota state quarters is again seen here as the lowest clash mark in the field while the entire series of clash marks on the Okalahoma quarter are similarly seen on a 2003-P Maine quarter clashed die reverse that we documented a few years ago.

    In looking at the overlay provided above you can see how the design areas on the obverse,  match up with the areas of clash marks on the reverse of the clashed Okalahoma "launch quarters" found by Owens.  For those of you who want to lean how to create overlays like the one shown here: I photographed the obverse of a normal coin and then borrowed the "line art" version of the reverse design from the U.S. Mint website and downsized it to the same size as my photo of the obverse.  I then imported the images into Adobe Photoshop™ and inverted and horizontally flipped the image of the obverse into the orientation it would be in relation to the reverse when the dies came together.  I then used the circular cloning tool set at an opacity level of about 50%, to copy the image of the reverse and then dropped it right over the image of the obverse. Presto! We have a composite image that illustrates what areas of the obverse/reverse match up in a clash.


In The News ...
Last Chance For Lettered-Edge Sac Dollar Errors?


Photo Courtesy of PCGS
Here is a look at the Sacagawea dollar with edge inscription submitted to PCGS by Andrew Moores

  February 11, 2008 -- For those of you who haven't noticed, the U.S. Mint website now shows that the 2007 Philadelphia minted Sacagawea dollar rolls are no longer available.  In plain English this statement often means "sold out," though hobbyists have learned in recent years, that this is not always the case.  The "P" & "D" Mint bags have been "sold out" for months with speculation rampant as to whether or not they could sell out their specially wrapped 25-piece rolls in a like manner.

    What the "sell out" of the Philadelphia rolls suggests is that the slightly higher mintage Denver issue will probably follow suit and "sell out" too. Some will see this as their last chance to get in on the deal at issue price.  But why would you want to buy them?  The most obvious reason would be that they may increase in value as often occurs after a Mint item is closed out.   However, others have suggested that this is where you might be able to find additional pieces of the Denver minted Sac dollars with a lettered edge ... if more exist.  The theory goes something like this: one specimen has been found so far and where there is one there is usually more.  The Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, Cal., paid the finder of the first example of this error a reward $10,000.00 so there is lots of incentive to find additional examples even though they may not be worth this much in the retail market.  Since the 2007 Sac dollars were not distributed to the public through the banking system and had to be purchased by collectors/speculators directly from the U.S. Mint at a premium,  it has been reasoned that more of the errors may be in those "collector"  rolls or bags sold by the Mint. Other theories exist as to how the lettered edge Sac got out of the Denver Mint but these "theories" are a moot point to this discussion.  

    What we need to be pay special attention to is the fact that the one known specimen of the lettered edge Sac error was reported found in circulation.  Some suggest that this is nearly impossible since the Mint did not release any 2007 Sacs into circulation but the fact is that it is not unusual for a collector to buy a roll of coins or even a bag or more from the Mint so that he/she can pick out the superior specimens to be saved and then dump the lackluster pieces in a bank or spend them.  So it is not really all that unusual for a few coins that were never officially released into circulation to end up there.  Even proof coins enter circulation from time to time.

    However, what most folks are missing is the fact that this coin was run through the Schuler Edge Lettering Machine.  What that means is that if it did get out in error, that the coin most probably got mixed in with a bin of Presidential dollars and then taken to the edge lettering machine.  This could have occurred if a tub used previously to haul Sac dollars was emptied and then used to haul Presidential dollars.  If one or a few Sacs remained in the bin for one reason or another they could have gotten mixed in with the Presidential dollars and run through the edge lettering machine.  This suggests that the coin would not have even came out of a Sac roll but more probably from a roll of Presidential dollars assuming the coin left the Mint in a legitimate manner!

    So if you are hoping to find edge marked Sac dollar errors in Sac rolls, you'll probably be disappointed.  Nonetheless, buying a few 2007-D Sac rolls may not be a bad idea.  The coin is of relatively low mintage and may do well on its own merits.  Rolls of  past issues sold exclusively to collectors are doing well.  I purchased a few of both the Philadelphia and Denver rolls and have my fingers crossed but won't be checking them for errors!  KP


In The News ...
Monroe Dollars Struck On Quarter Planchets 


Image Digitally Manipulated To Appear The Same Color As A Quarter Dollar Coin; The Actual Errors Would Also Most Probably Be Weakly Struck Especially Along the Rims and Undoubtedly Be Somewhat Out-Of-Round Since There Would Not Have Been Enough Metal Present To Completely Fill the Collar.

    February 09, 2008 -- The U.S. Mint has confirmed that a number of "irregular" 2008-P James Monroe Presidential dollars have been returned to the Mint from a contractor that wraps coinage for the Mint.  The coins were struck on standard copper-nickel clad quarter-dollar planchets rather than the intended manganese-brass clad dollar planchets.  According to Paul Gilkes' front page Coin World article, as of the publication's February 1 noon deadline, the Mint had confirmed an awareness that a number of the errors could enter into circulation on the coin's official release date of February 14.  A source to CW indicated that the number of errors produced could range anywhere from 70,000 to 140,000 pieces.  On February 4, after conducting an inquiry, the Mint stated that it "presently has no evidence to indicate that any irregular James Monroe Presidential $1 Coins have been sent to the nation's banks."  The Mint statement says in full:

    "In mid-January, the United States Mint's coin-wrapping contractor alerted the agency when it found some irregular James Monroe Presidential $1 coins. The coins in question were immediately returned to the United States Mint. The United States Mint has performed an internal inquiry and presently has no evidence to indicate that any irregular James Monroe Presidential $1 Coins have been sent to the nation's banks. The United States Mint expects to make an estimated 103 million James Monroe Presidential $1 Coins."

  Now the question is, did the Mint really recover all the errors?  Past history suggests that they may not have.  If you decide to look for them, they will be the color of a quarter-dollar, thinner, underweight and not perfectly round with the thinnest areas of the coin near the rims were lettering might appear to be stretched or flowing toward the edge.  The edge inscription will be weak if at all present and will only show as partial letters due to the lack of thickness of the planchet to accommodate the width of the characters.

     It will be interesting to see how this plays out.  Let us know what you find!

 Stories on this news can be found here: All Monroe 'Quarters' Recaptured, here: Monroe Dollars Struck on Quarter Planchets, and here: Major Monroe Dollar Error Coins Confirmed!  It can also be found on the front page of the February 18  issue of Coin World.  KP

    March 05, 2008:  Update!  It is interesting to note that as of today's date NOBODY has reported finding any of the Monroe dollars struck on quarter planchets! 


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Shifted Lettering On Adams Dollars!


Photo courtesy of Vess

 February 09, 2008 -- According to one Cherrypicker, (who simply goes by the name of Vess), profiteers who searched 2007-P Adams dollars for Smooth Edge and Doubled Inscription Edge Errors, may have missed the boat on another error that he has found a number of so far.  His finds involve a very significant narrowing in the spacing between the "P" Mintmark and the "E" of E PLURIBUS UNUM.  This type of error is most easily found by stacking the coins one on top of the other with the date and Mintmark  lined up evenly over each other and then looking to see if there are any significant closures between the P and E.  Shown here is a stack of some of the dollars with this error that he has accumulated thus far.  The coin on the bottom displays the normal spacing between the P and E, which is quite considerable.  The rest of the coins are shown in a progression starting from the top with the spacing narrowing to a greater degree between the P and E on each coin down the stack.  So far, Vess has found about 120 examples of this edge inscription shift with varying degrees of spacing.


In The News ...
Two New Presidential Dollar Errors ID'd!
1st Madison Plain Edge / 3rd Denver Adams Double Edge Reported!


One Of Only Three Denver Minted Adams Dollars Currently Known With Double
Edge Lettering.  The Arrow Points To The Denver Mintmark.


Photos © Ken Potter 2008
Here Is A Shot Of The Only Plain Edge Madison Dollar Reported So Far.

   February 1, 2008 -- A Michigan collector, who prefers to remain anonymous, has reported finding two rare Presidential dollar errors.  The coins include the first published report for a Denver version of a 2007 Adams dollar with a double edge inscription and the first report for a (2007) Madison dollar with the edge inscription missing.  Numismatic Guarantee Corporation of Sarasota, Florida, certified both coins.  Details of the story can be seen on page 4 of the February 4 issue of Coin World.  

See The Numismatic News Online Version Here

See The Numismaster Online Version Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
Another 1969-S Doubled Die Found In Michigan!


A Look At "IN GOD WE TRUST" And "ERTY" of LIBERTY Shows
Us Just How Strong This Rarity Is!


Photos © Ken Potter 2008
The Latest '69-S DDO Found Exhibits Strong Strike Doubling On
 "9" of Date And S Mint Mark. Compare It To The Tremonti Specimen
 Below To See The Difference.

    January 25, 2008 -- Another 1969-S hub doubled die Lincoln cent has been found in Michigan!  The find comes right on the heels of a specimen located by Michigander, Michael Tremonti who found one in an uncirculated roll of the cents on October 3, 2007. The finder of the newest example, who preferred to remain anonymous and was close-mouthed about any details as to exactly when and where it was found, would only say that he cherrypicked it from an uncirculated roll of 1969-S cents after seeing the story on the Tremonti find in the October 29, 2007 issue of Coin World. Interestingly, this newest find flies in the face of conventional wisdom that is often erroneously passed on to collectors that suggests that if the Mintmark is also doubled that it is not the doubled die.  Here we see that the doubled die can in fact also be affected with strike doubling!  Details on this newest find can be seen in Ken Potter's version of the story in the January 28 issue of Coin World and in Mike Ellis' version of the story in the current issue of Numismatic News .

See The Numismaster Web Version by Mike Ellis Here

See The Numismatic News Version by Mike Ellis Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
"Fresh" 1969-S Doubled Die Cent Sells For Record Price!
$126,500.00 For Coin Found In BU Roll!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007/Coin Courtesy of Michael Tremonti

    January 10, 2008 -- Just moments before this news item was posted, the Michael Tremonti Specimen of the 1969-S Doubled Die cent was hammed down for $126,500.00 (including the buyer's fee) by Heritage Auctions, held in conjunction with the FUN Convention!  The coin was sold to an Internet bidder.  Internet bidding ended on January 9 while the live auction was held on January 10.  The coin received nine bids.  The previous record for this variety was $85,100.00 for a PCGS MS64 R&B sold by Bowers & Merena Auctions last August. The Tremonti specimen graded PCGS MS64 Red, tying with just one other coin for the highest graded.  It was claimed by at least one PCGS insider to very possibly be the finest known example based on visual appearances.  Two pieces graded PCGS-65 Red that appeared on the population reports in the past were removed for reasons that have never been fully explained.

See The Auction Catalog Description/Photos

See The Original Story Here

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Recent Finds ...
2007-P Madison Dollar Found With Doubled Die


Photos © Ken Potter 2008/Coin Courtesy of Shawn Bell
Significant Markers For The Variety Are Found Below UNITED.

    January 12, 2008 -- Cherrypicker, Shawn Bell of PA sent in a nice example of a 2007-P James Madison Presidential dollar with hub doubling as pointed out by the arrows.  It is the result of a tilted hub doubled die.  I do not think that James Wiles has it listed yet but it is listed by John Wexler as WDDR-001 and is featured in his Coin World, Varieties Notebook column this month. Wexler and I co-author the VN column with my installments appearing in the first issue of every month and Wexler's appearing in the third issue of every month. KP

Read More About This Form Of Doubling On Other Presidental Dollars


Members Share...
Die Dent With Pressure Ridges On A 1998-P Nickel

Implications for the Wisconsin "Extra Leaf" Quarters
by Mike Diamond


Photo courtesy of Mike Diamond
Click On Image For Larger View

    January 05, 2008 -- Those who attribute unusual significance to the the Wisconsin "extra leaf" quarters place a lot of emphasis on one feature. It is a dimple or trough located just below the concave edge of the "low leaf". The dimple corresponds to a pressure ridge on the die face. To investigators like Chris Pilliod, this feature indicates that the die was altered when it was in a softened, or annealed state. He reasons that localized metal displacement of this magnitude is unlikely in a hardened, or tempered die. Those who argue that the extra leaves were intentionally placed on the die believe the dimple validates their position, since they cannot think of any mishap that would occur accidentally while the dies are awaiting final processing.
I initially found Chris' argument persuasive. I have quite a few examples of coins struck by damaged dies (some quite severely), and I could not find evidence of a pressure ridge in any of them. Recently, however, I purchased a 1998-P nickel struck by a die with a long, deep, and very straight die dent. It shows three dimples above a ridge whose relief is as great as the letters of UNUM through which it passes. In 2006 Ken Potter reported on a Minnesota quarter with a smaller die dent that also shows development of pressure ridges.
These two specimens raise doubts about the significance of a pressure ridge. If the ridges formed in hardened dies as the result of an impact during normal press operation, it would indicate that even hardened die steel can suffer localized deformation. If the ridges formed while the dies were in a softened state, it indicates that accidental impacts do occur while the dies are awaiting final heating, quenching, and tempering.


In The News...
Wyoming Error Found in Quarter Proof Set!


Photos © Ken Potter 2007/Coin Courtesy of Paul Kmiotek

    November 29, 2007 -- Paul Kmiotek of NY was in for a surprise when he opened a States Quarter Proof set that his In-laws gave him on his Birthday this September! The last thing he expected to find was a major error. Yet, that is exactly what he encountered when he slid the set out it the Mint box and saw that lower right corner of the case was jammed partially open by the high flange of a misstruck Wyoming State quarter! At first he didn't notice the error and tried to snap the case back closed but the high flange that was cupped upward from obverse forced it to spring back open. He then noticed the "problem" and decided to contact Numismatic News about his find. The report was forwarded to me and I then consulted with a pool of experts to see what they thought. 

See Rest of Story Here 

Note to authors/publishers:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors/publishers are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


Not So Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds 1919-D Die Cracks 10c Metal Detecting

    November 25, 2007 -- Raymond Reid of Michigan reports some pretty neat die cracks on a 1919-D Mercury dime that he found while treasure hunting.  He said: "I've had this coin for over 30 years but never really got into variety and error coins.  I do collect coins and have a nice collection. I found this one at the Saginaw Fairgrounds in Saginaw, MI.  I found several Mercury dimes that day and I was set to call it a day, when I noticed an area by one of the horse barns where there used to be a penny arcade -- a nice area protected from the elements by a large overhang.  The area where I found the coin was mostly sand, it was probably seven inches below the surface and was very clean, probably due to the clean dry sand it had been laying in for I don't know how many years.  When I got home I got out my magnifying glass and looked over all the coins and I noticed what I believed were die breaks on the 1919 but wasn't sure.  I put it in a white stapled holder and printed d.b.on it for die break and it has been in one of my books ever since. I took it out after I had seen a 1942/1 Mercury dime sell on eBay.  Anyway the 2/1 looked a bit like the die break going through my date on the 1919-D so I took it out and looked at it again.  Over the years I have done some reading on die breaks and other types of error coins.  Looking at it this time I realized how pronounced the breaks were. I had forgotten about the die break through the R of TRUST and didn't notice the I and T (of LIBERTY) had a break above each letter from the center of the letters to the rims  -- very small but noticeable. I would be very happy to have you show it on the CONECA website as I find it it interesting and fascinating to see die breaks and other errors.  Now I find myself looking much closer at my collection. I have been collecting coins since 1969 and find it a wonderful and very interesting hobby. I am sure you feel the same way. I looked at a number of your coins on your website, and there are some very interesting ones.  Your website gives collectors great insights on error and varieties."

Note: Thanks Raymond for your story!  Anybody else have an interesting find to share?  The finds don't have to major just something interesting! Send them to the webmaster at conecawebsite@koinpro.com and images of suitable quality and interest will be shown.


Members Share ...
Neff Makes "Wavy Steps & Tails Files" Public

    August 24, 2007 --  CONECA member BJ Neff offers free access to his the complete listings on "Trail Dies" and "Wavy Steps" varieties.  These are aberrations found mostly on Lincoln cents that some feel are a type of hub doubling and others feel are yet unexplained and in need of more study.  His work has found a home on CONECA ErrorScope editor, Frank Leone's web site located at http://www.1793.com.  All 431 listings, compiled by Neff can be found here: http://www.1793.com/resources/traildies/traildies.htm. According to Neff, "there are some corrections that have to be made and I am in the process of re-reading the whole files. Frank's idea of putting it into PDF format was outstanding for now these files can be accessed by all who show an interest in collecting this type die anomaly."  Nice work BJ!


Recent Finds ...
CA Man Finds Massive Cud In Circulated 1c Roll


Photo courtesy of Klaus Schwalfenberg 

    December 4, 2007 -- Klaus Schwalfenberg of CA found this beautiful large Major Die Break (Cud) while searching through a circulated roll of cents today!  Nice find Klaus!


In The News ...
2005-P California 25c Doubled Die Reported!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007/Coin Courtesy of Harold Kuykendall

    November 23, 2007 -- According to Ken Potter in his latest installment of Coin World's, Varieties Notebook, (a bimonthly column that he and John Wexler share alternately),  Harold Kuykendall of Virginia sent in what appears to be the first doubled die reverse reported for the 2005-P California State quarter.  Like its brethren found on the Minnesota quarters, the doubling involves an area located in the virtual dead center of the design.  In this case it appears to be some type of foliage, possibly a tree, found at the left side of Yosemite Valley’s monolithic granite headwall, Half Dome.  More details on the variety can be seen in the December 3 issue of Coin World. 

See More Images Here


In The News ...
PCGS Certifies 1969-S Doubled Die Cent


Click Picture To See PCGS PhotoCertificate
Photos courtesy of Professional Coin Grading Service

    October 25, 2007 -- Yes, you can still find valuable coins! Professional Coin Grading Service has certified a recently discovered modern rarity, a 1969 San Francisco Mint doubled die obverse Lincoln Cent. It's graded PCGS Mint State 64 Red and tied for the finest known!
The coin was discovered by Michigan collector, Michael Tremonti, who was examining two rolls of uncirculated 1969-S cents on October 3. After consulting with well-known error-variety expert, Ken Potter, he (Potter) submitted the coin to PCGS. 

    "I was totally amazed that this coin could turn up out of nowhere. The coin is completely original and full mint red. It's a beautiful near-Gem example," said David Hall, PCGS co-founder and president of Collectors Universe, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLCT). "What an incredible find! This could be a six-figure coin." 

    Including this latest discovery piece, the PCGS Population Report indicates only 23 1969-S doubled die cents from Very Fine to MS-64, and only two are graded Mint State Red.

    The coin discovered by Tremonti has strong doubling on the obverse in the date, 1969, and the words, LIBERTY and IN GOD WE TRUST. It's described by Potter as "a Class I Rotated Hub with counter-clockwise doubling."

    A1969-S doubled die cent, graded PCGS MS-64 Red Brown was sold for $85,100 in the Bowers and Merena Auctions sale in August. The Tremonti coin is full red, tied for finest known with one other MS-64 Red, and with no higher grade examples in the PCGS Population Report.

    PCGS is a division of Collectors Universe, Inc.  For additional information about PCGS, call Customer Service at (800) 447-8848 or visit online at www.PCGS.com.


In The News ...
PCGS Confirms Lettered-Edge
Sac and Plain-Edge Jefferson Dollars


Photo Courtesy of PCGS
Here is a look at the Sacageawa dollar with edge inscription submitted to PCGS by Andrew Moores


Photo © Ken Potter 2007
Here is a look at the first plain edge Jefferson dollar reported by Bruce Countyman

    November 20, 2007 -- Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, CA, has certified the first reported Sacagawea golden dollar coin struck with the edge lettering intended only for Presidential dollars. The submitter will receive a $10,000 finder's reward from PCGS.
"The United States Mint set up specific internal procedures in an attempt to prevent this type of error from happening. But it did happen, and it's an amazing-looking error," said Ron Guth, PCGS President.
The 2007-dated coin was struck at the Denver Mint and has been examined and authenticated by the experts at PCGS. The coin was submitted by Andrew Moores of Lakewood, Colorado who found the coin in his pocket change. Moores believes he could have had the coin for as long as two weeks and only noticed it when he compared it with other Sacagawea Dollars that he had already set aside. 
Moores was unaware of the reward until a coin collector friend mentioned that he had seen the offer on the PCGS Message Boards. According to Guth, who spoke with the submitter about the find, "Needless to say, Mr. Moores is a very happy man."

    PCGS also confirms it now has certified 301 Jefferson dollars erroneously struck without edge lettering. 
"Four different Presidential dollars have been released so far - George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison - and now we've seen the so-called 'Godless' error on three of them. It seems ironic that we've got Presidential dollars without the motto In God We Trust and an error Sac dollar that has it on both the obverse and the edge," said Guth.  The first Jefferson dollar reported with a plain edge was publicized in the October 8 issue of  Coin World and October 2 issue of Numismatic News a full three weeks before any additional specimens surfaced.  That one was submitted by Bruce Countryman of IA who obtained it from an individual who wished to remain anonymous.

    This past March, PCGS announced it was offering a $10,000 reward to the first person who submitted for verification a genuine Sacagawea dollar struck with Presidential dollar edge lettering. The incuse lettering includes the year of minting and the mottos, IN GOD WE TRUST and E PLURIBUS UNUM. Normal Sacagawea dollars have plain edges.

    "We figured sooner or later an edge-lettered Sac dollar would be produced because there are literally hundreds of millions of Presidential dollars being struck. There's one additional major error we think might show up: an over-strike with both the Sacagawea and Presidential designs on the same coin." said Guth. PCGS has a standing offer of $10,000 to be the first to authenticate such an overstrike.

    Earlier, PCGS earlier paid a $2,500 finder's reward to Ray and Mary Smith of Fort Collins, Colorado who submitted the first known lettered-edge blank planchet Presidential dollar in March soon after the Washington dollars went into circulation.

    PCGS is a division of Collectors Universe, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLCT). Additional information is available from Professional Coin Grading Service at (800) 447-8848. E-mail: info@PCGS.com.


In The News ...
Wyoming Cud Reported By Collector


Photos © Ken Potter 2007

    November 8, 2007 -- According to a feature in the current issue of Numismatic News, its readers are continuing to find Major Die Breaks (Cuds) on States quarters. According to NN feature writer, Ken Potter, the latest one to cross his desk is on a Philadelphia issue Wyoming quarter reported to him by Mike Bozynski who found it in an original roll.

See The Story Here


Recent Finds ...
Die Break, Chips On Wy Quarters Abound!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007

    November 8, 2007 -- Another thing we are seeing on Wyoming quarters is a multitude of reports of die cracks, die chips, die breaks and clash marks.  The photo shown above is from Philadelphia specimen sent in by Douglas Rall of Idaho.  These aren't worth much in terms of what they fetch on eBay (a buck or so) but nonetheless fun to find and collect.


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds "Extra Ray" Clashed Jeff $1


Photo © Ken Potter 2007/ Coin courtesy of Byron Jones

     October 25, 2007 -- Byron Jones sent in a neat die clash on a 2007-D Jefferson Presidential dollar that looks every bit like a spike protruding from Liberty's neck and another long spike that mimics an "Extra Ray" in Liberty's crown.  There are other areas of clash on this variety on the obverse and reverse including that running below the torch in Liberty's right hand (viewer's left).  Jones sent it in on October 4 and while it is not the first clash we've seen it is one of the most interesting. KP


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds 90 Degree Rotated Reverse Nickel!


Images by R. Maher

    October 17, 2007 -- R. Maher of Georgia reports finding a 2005-P Jefferson / Bison reverse five cents with a wildly rotated reverse.  He said he found the coin in a $2.00 hand-wrapped roll of nickels from a bank in western Georgia. He said: "I spin each coin around in my fingers before rolling them back up specifically to check for errors like this.  If you are holding the coin with the obverse facing you, like in the image to the left and then you spin it around (from side to side), it appears exactly like the in image of the reverse to the right.  The only other rotated reverse he said he found was a memorial cent at about 45 degrees rotated.  He suggests that if others start looking, they might find more like these and we can learn more about their distribution, etc.  Anybody else find any?  Let us know by sending an email by clicking here: conecawebsiteeditor


In The News ...
"Fresh" 1969-S Doubled Die Obverse
Lincoln Cent Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007

     October 17, 2007 -- Error-variety coin dealer, Ken Potter of Michigan announces that a “fresh” 1969-S Doubled Die Obverse #1 Lincoln cent has been discovered.  He said that a “local collector” cherrypicked a specimen from out of an uncirculated roll on October 3.  The coin was consigned to him  to sell and is currently at Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, CA for certification and grading.  He feels that it may very well tie for the finest piece graded or exceed it. He says that it appears to be just one of two mint state specimens known that is full red. 

See The Rest Of The Story & Images  


In The News ...
PCGS Confirms Jefferson Clipped Planchet Error


Photos courtesy of Phil Arnold & Professional Coin Grading Service

    October 12, 2007 -- The Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, California has certified two of the recently-released 2007-D Thomas Jefferson dollar coins with nearly identically-located 3.5 percent, semi-circular planchet clips.  "Both coins were discovered in a government-sealed 'first day of issue' box as part of a bulk submission sent in by someone who wants to remain anonymous. The graders were surprised to find not one, but two Jefferson dollars with curved planchet clips along the top left edge of the coins when viewed from Jefferson's portrait," said Ron Guth, PCGS President. One coin was graded PCGS MS-66, the other was MS-67.

    A clipped planchet, also known as an incomplete planchet error, occurs during the minting process when the coin blank (which will eventually become a planchet once it is run through the upset mill)  is not correctly punched out from a strip of metal. Most clips will be curved, ragged or straight with the most common being the curved.

    "The clipped planchet Jefferson dollars certainly are interesting to see. Someone jokingly suggested that because 3.5 percent of each coin is missing they might only be worth 96.5 cents. But we all know that nice error coins are worth considerably more than face value," said Guth.

    PCGS is a division of Collectors Universe, Inc.  For additional information about PCGS, call Customer Service at (800) 447-8848 or visit online at www.PCGS.com.


Recent Finds ...
First Plain Edge Jefferson Dollar Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007

    September 16, 2007 -- CONECA is honored to be the first to show a Jefferson dollar with a plain edge or what some call a smooth edge and still others sensationalize as a "godless dollar!"  At this point we will say nothing more other than to watch for the stories coming up in the next issues of Coin World and Numismatic News!  Credits to the finder, where it was found, which Mint it was from, etc., will all be forthcoming.

Read The Numismatic News Story Here


Recent Finds ...
Double Clipped Adams Dollar Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007

    September 09, 2007 -- Alberto Irizarry of Michigan decided to do what many Michigan collectors had been doing weeks ago and went out to search some rolls of John Adams dollars for double edge lettering errors.  He struck out in that regard but he did find something, which in Michigan anyway, has been far more elusive.  He ran into a 2007-P Adams dollar with a major error of another stripe!  His coin bears two significant curved clips.  I met him at the Redford Township Coin Show in Michigan and took these photos of his find.  The story appeared on page 42 of the July 17 issue of Numismatic News.  Congratulations Alberto! KP

Learn More About Incomplete Planchet Errors Here


In The News ...
Doubled Die Reverse Jefferson Dollar Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2007
Click photo for larger image

     August 25, 2007 -- Ken Potter reports in his Educational Image Gallery that: "On August 16, the day the new Thomas Jefferson Presidential dollars were released to the public, Chuck Chichinski of Bellefontaine, Ohio went to his bank to obtain his two rolls of the dollars.  Having read a report on the www.coins.about.com website that doubled dies existed on the Adams dollars, he quickly went to work to see if any of the new Jeffersons he had obtained had a similar affliction.  By the third or fourth coin in his first roll, he discovered that he had found his first Jefferson dollar doubled die reverse!  It was similar but more major than the one alluded to on the coins.about.com site!

See The Rest Of The Story

    September 20, 2007 -- Numismatic News reader, Stephen M. Webber or NC saw the story on the above coin and reported the following: "I received my September 25th Numismatic News today with your article on the Jefferson DDR that Chuck Chichinski submitted to you. Out of curiosity I immediately opened a couple of rolls and found 12 like your pictures. These rolls came from a box with the following data: CWI #103, Jun 21, 2007, Inspected by # XXX4.  All mine are P Mint and I obtained the box from a bank in Hendersonville, NC.   Thanks for the report Stephen


In The News ...
Adams Dollars Sport Double Edge Inscriptions / Plain Edges


Photo © Ken Potter 2007
On this Adams dollar you can see IBUS of of EPU over the date. This one shows the Stage 2 edge lettering die impressed over a Stage 1 which many are calling Large over Small Lettering. The double edge lettered coins were found with both Stage 1 over Stage 1 and Stage 2 over 1.

    July 19, 2007 -- Over the past several weeks Adams dollar error have dominated the news as massive finds of the coins with double edge inscriptions (commercially referred to as double edge letting) and smooth edges have been hauled out of southeastern Michigan by the thousands!  Both Numismatic News and Coin World have been on top of the story giving readers a weekly play by play on the happening.  The NN stories can be seen at the links below.

New error dollar appears; Edge of Adams coins impressed twice

Double, smooth edges on 2007-P Adams

Possible New Font Size Seen On Adams Edges

Gnarled Edge Variation, Out-Of-Round - Matte Edge Type, Font Sizes Discussion On Adams Dollars


Recent Finds ...
Shifted Edge Inscription Found On
George Washington "Golden" Dollar

    March 24, 2007 -- Reports of missing edge lettering on 2007 George Washington Presidential Dollars appear to be confusing some readers says Ken Potter in his latest Numismatic News article on the Smooth-Edge dollar errors. "While I have shown images of the dollars missing this inscription, I have not shown them with the edge lettering present alongside the errors for comparison. The confusion seems to be in the fact that some folks are not sure what the difference is between the rim and the edge of a coin. Thus, they are not sure of where this edge lettering belongs."  To eliminate this confusion, Potter shows two stacks of the dollars side by side with and without edge lettering. The stack to the left is obviously with the edge lettering while the stack to the right is missing the lettering. The photo is courtesy of Kent H. of the eBay Internet store Numis-Mart.


Photo courtesy of Garrett Reich
Garrett Reich of Michigan found a 2007-P Washington dollar with the edge inscription partially shifted.
The red arrow points to where the motto, E PLURIBUS UNUM, begins on the error dollar.

    Potter also describes two different types of edge errors sent in by NN readers including flattened edge lettering and shifted edge lettering.

See The Online Version Of The NN Article


Recent Finds ...
Denver Mint Smooth-Edge Washington Dollars
Reported by Weinberg!
by Ken Potter -- NLG


Coins courtesy of Fred Weinberg/Photo by Ken Potter
A stack of 20 of the Denver issued 2007 Washington dollars sans the edge lettering.
Notice that none of these dollars show the copper showing through like
on the Philadelphia stack in the article below this one!


The Philadelphia coin on the top shows a wide band of copper showing through
on the edge while the Denver coin at the bottom appears golden throughout.

    March 13, 2007 -- Long time CONECA (founding) member, Fred Weinberg has confirmed that Plain-Edge Washington dollars are now coming out of rolls of Denver Mint produced coins.  What seemed to just be a rumor weeks earlier is now a proven fact as numerous finders are beginning to report the Denver version found in rolls distributed in California, Colorado and Chicago for starters. Weinberg stated:

 “Last Friday I bought 70 (out of 72) Plain Edges from a local coin shop.  A lady had gone into her local bank branch on Ventura Blvd. in Sherman Oaks (next door to Encino, about two miles east of me), asked for a $1,000 worth of dollars. The teller laughed at her and said, "You won't find any of those errors that are on the news - they're all being found in Florida."  She bought a $1,000 box of paper rolled coins, and found 72 Plain Edges! These coins are all from the downtown Los Angeles Federal Reserve, where my bank downstairs got theirs.  Yesterday at the same shop, a merchant two doors down came up with six of them! Tom DeLorey examined the first "Denver" Plain Edge last week in Chicago, and my coins match his as far as "edge comparison".  There is a difference that can be seen between the D's and P's, but I'm not sure if it's significant enough for the grading services to be able to put Philadelphia or Denver on a holder.”

    The differences that Weinberg describes between the Denver and Philadelphia issues focuses on the amount of the copper core that can be seen on each.  The Philadelphia issues tend to show a wide copper ring on one side of the edge while the Denver minted coins show an entirely golden edge.  This is true so far on both lettered-edge and smooth-edge examples examined so far by Weinberg and other observes including this author.  Both Weinberg and I agreed that these characteristics could change and are perhaps not the best indicator of Mint in the long run but for now they seem valid.
    This brings us back to a point I made in my article published in Numismatic News last week, (mailed to subscribers on March 9 and dated March 20),  that it is important to try to find normal coins from the same rolls that the plain-edge coins are found in that carry the identical die characteristics as the plain edge coins.  If a specific die scratch, die crack, die chip, die break, etc., can be found that is shared by both a plain-edge and lettered-edge coin, pairing them together as a set will prove forever where the plain-edge coin was manufactured.  This might prove valuable later as grading services might require such proof to note the Mint of manufacturer on a holder.  Without this proof the coins may continue to be attributed without a Mintmark.

    I want to go one record here as stating that I believe that the smooth-edge variation will be a continuing error that we will see on every issue of the Presidential dollar series!

Below are a number of links to article off-site on the subject:

Plain Edge Errors Found In Denver Mint Rolls

D-Mint Plain Edge Dollars Might Be Told Apart From P-Mint Dollars

Presidential Dollars Fraud Report - Beware of "Buffy Dollars"

Washington Dollar Plain Edge Coins - FAQs


The Faceless Dollar Joins the Growing List of Major Washington Dollar Errors


A Comprehensive List Of Reported GW Dollar Errors


Recent Finds ...
Washington Presidential Dollar
"Smooth Edge" Error Reports Swell


Photo courtesy of Kent H/Numis-Mart

March 11 , 2007 -- CONECA member, Kent H (N-3914) of the eBay based Internet store Numis-Mart was one of the earlier persons to find the now well-known "Godless" Washington Presidential dollars with edge lettering missing.  On March 5 he said:  “I was lucky enough to have a family member in Tallahassee when the story broke on February 24th, so he went to as many banks as possible and bought as many rolls as each bank would allow.  We ended up with a few of these coins, which made me very happy!”  Several days later after many more finds, he said:  “We literally went through thousands of coins.  Most rolls had zero errors.  Then we would find some rolls with multiple errors.  All-told, we found about 200 of these coins—but we think we got lucky at one or two of the banks we stopped at.  Out of all the rolls we went through, only a few rolls held errors.  All I know is this: if we opened a roll that had errors, it had on average, ten errors (minimum 6, maximum 16); otherwise, it had zero errors.  These came from Tallahassee rolls, with other coins in the same rolls bearing the “P” mintmark.  My assumption is that, at most, one bin got by.  If the bin was nearly full, the total number of coins would be in the 100,000 to 300,000 range.”

Untold numbers of the coins somehow missed the edge letting station at the Philadelphia Mint and are missing the date, Mintmark and E PLURIBUS UNUM and IN GOD WE TRUST.  Some observers have been referring to them as "Godless" dollars ever since the wire services got wind of the story and began airing it in the local and national newspapers and on television and radio stations.  If the quantities are as high as Kent thinks they may be, he could be correct in that an entire bin somehow bypassed the edge-lettering station and was processed as finished coins.  If the quantities are very high the coins may prove to be quite affordable somewhere in the under $100 range.  If not they could go higher depending on collector demand and dealer promotions.  As of Sunday morning, March 11,  they were trading  from a low of about $92 to upward of $200 each for ungraded specimens. Over 1500 lots containing one or more of the coins have traded on eBay in the past two weeks.


n The News ...
1946-S Inverted S Cent Reported!


Images courtesy of ANACS/Coin courtesy of Robert Neff
Here is a look at the 1946-S cent with Inverted
Mint Mark Notice the flat-faced "knob-tail" serif
at top & almost detached large bulbous serif at bottom


Image © 2006 Ken Potter
Here is a look at the same MM style upright
Notice the almost detached large bulbous serif
at the top & flat-faced "knob-tail" serif at bottom
You can see another example of the normal Ball Serif 
supplied by Michael S. Fey by clicking here or on the picture above

     June 29, 2006 -- After years of erroneous reports of 1946-S cents being found with Inverted Mintmarks, CONECA member, Robert Neff of Florida has finally found one!  It involves the Ball Serif/Knob Tail style of Mintmark, which is one of three different mintmark styles used that year. The use of this mintmark punch was restricted from 1944 through 1946 with it ranging from common to rare to nonexistent depending on the date/denomination involved.  On the 1946-S Lincoln cent it is considered scarce by Bill Fivaz and very scarce by Ken Potter.  ANACS attributed the coin as an Inverted Mintmark and graded it AU-58. CONECA's 20th Century Variety Attributer, James Wiles listed the coin as an Inverted Mintmark designated as IMM-001.  Details of the discovery, an examination of the three Mint mark styles used that year, a listing of all Inverted Mintmarks known on US coins and a report on how Mint Engravers normally keep Mintmark punches in correct position are examined by Potter in his article appearing in Coin World's, Collectors' Clearinghouse column dated July 3.

    Note to authors:  CONECA is interested in publishing news releases highlighting current stories published elsewhere that are associated with error-variety coins and/or the minting process.  Interested authors are encouraged to send an abstract along with a photo or more and details of when and where the article was published to the CONECA webmaster at: conecawebsite@koinpro.com  (please -- only email submissions).


In The News ...
Genuine Two-Tailed Coins Exceedingly Rare!
Most Are Fakes


Image Courtesy Of Fred Weinberg


Images courtesy of Abbott's Corp.

    June 28, 2006 -- In his article Real Or Fake? Coin World editor, Paul Gilkes, makes clear that the likelihood of finding a genuine two-tailed or two-headed coin in circulation is "slim to none."  Like Coin World, CONECA has, over the years, receives more questions about two-headed and two-tailed coins than just about any other question you can think of!  If you have one of these critters and think it is real, take a look at Gilkes' story and then rethink the whole proposal!

Coin World Story: Real or Fake? 
 CONECA's Story:  Two-Headed Coins     Old Flyer Offering Two-Tailed Quarter


In the News ...

Alleged 1950-S Over D OMM 10c Debunked!
Turns out to be even rarer form of repunching


Photo © Ken Potter 2004

September 12, 2004 -- In response to overlays that were created of an S over an Inverted S, James Wiles, who oversees the 20th Century Variety Coin listings for CONECA, said: "I am fairly well convinced this is an S over inverted S. The clincher for me is the notch on the upper side of the vertical bar. This notch is characteristic of the mintmark style and is found on the lower side of the vertical bar. To be found on the upper side would require the (S Mint mark) punch to have been inverted." In a later phone interview he stated that he had long felt the OMM designation was questionable and in light of the results of the current studies, he said he will be changing the CONECA attribution of the variety from an OMM to an RPM." 

See The Full Story


New To The Web Site...

The Earliest Single-Squeeze Doubled Dies Known!
by Ken Potter - NLG


Canada 1991 $300 Platinum Doubled Die Reverse
Photo © Ken Potter 1992

    July 15, 2004 -- Attention is being given to recent US coins that are suspected by some observers to exhibit hub doubling from single-squeeze hubbed dies.  Supposedly, hub doubling is impossible via this process.  Ken Potter takes a look back at a similar scenario he faced well over a decade ago when he reported in the CONECA Errorscope (and other publications) upon even stronger doubled dies that began popping up on the coins of Canada long after the implementation of the single-squeeze hubbing process there in 1978.

See the article here


In The News ...
Unscrupulous Sellers Offering Upside Down
Edge-Letting As "Errors" on Washington Dollars


See how the edge lettering on the coin to the left faces up while it faces down on the coin to the right.
This is a normal variation and not an error!

March 11, 2007 -- Collectors are cautioned to avoid the offers of so-called errors with the edge letting upside-down on the Washington Presidential dollars.  These are not errors!  The coins are first struck and then transported to a Schuler Edge Lettering Machine where the coins are vacuum fed into the machine at random to be force-fed through a long grooved edge lettering die.  There is no attempt by the Mint to place the letting facing one side or the other (or to start and finish the inscriptions at any particular place on the coin).  Theoretically, if 300 million coins are struck for the Washington dollar, then 150 million should have the edge inscription facing the obverse and 150 million should have the inscription facing the reverse.  Calling them errors is factually incorrect.  Selling them as errors at inflated prices by those who know better is fraudulent.  These variations are, however, edge varieties that one may or may not decide to collect.

Traditionally collectors have ignored such variations on foreign coins where edge inscriptions are commonly found.  The last time U.S. collectors were hit with a dealer campaign to recognize the random placement of edge letting on coins as being varieties was with the heavily promoted Mexican 1968 Olympic 25 Peso coins which bore the inscription INDEPENDENCIA Y LIBERTAD on the edge.  Like the Washington dollars, the edge inscriptions were random in placement.  When collectors learned that this random placement was normal, the variations were quickly ignored.  Today, nobody even bothers to mention the orientation of edge letting on the many foreign coins that contain these elements.  That may not be the case with the Presidential dollars but so far none of the major grading services are distinguishing between them based on this criteria and it is doubtful that the album manufacturers will accommodate the varieties any time in the future.  No matter what the outcome of their popularity as collectable variations, either placement will be common and of no particular value over a non-attributed coin, so NO premium value should be paid for one over the other.  KP


New To The Web Site ...
MAD & O/C VA 25c Show
Erratic Pattern of Error Production
by Mike Diamond


Photo courtesy of  Mike Diamond

    March 10, 2005 -- In the September/October 2004 Errorscope I published an article entitled “Horizontal Misalignments of the Anvil Die”.  As part of my discussion, I presented a number of Virginia quarters struck by the same die pair that variously show 1) a misaligned anvil (obverse) die, 2) a misaligned hammer (reverse) die, and 3) an off-center strike.  Based on the presence/absence of collar clash on the obverse face, I concluded that the misaligned hammer die and the off-center strikes preceded the misaligned anvil die.  I was wrong.  All these coins are covered by an unusually large number of accidental die scratches, especially on the obverse face. Belatedly, I decided to study the scratches more closely to see if the number varied among my sample of 10 quarters. Vary they did, and I was able to identify six die stages.

See The Rest Of The Article


Reported In The Press ...

2000-P Sacagawea Dollars w/ Two Hubs

    July 21, 2005 -- Coin World has reported that the 2000-P Sacagawea dollars released to the public were actually made from two different hubs with variations in design detail on the eagle's tail feathers on the reverse.  Apparently the first 5,500 pieces issued, which were placed in specially marked boxes of Cheerios-brand cereal during a 2000 General Mills advertising promotion, were of a different "type" than those later released through normal circulation channels.

See Rest Of Story


Our Favorite Errors ...
Double Struck Indian Head

January 14, 2007 -- Members are invited to send images of some of their favorite errors to be featured in this column.  Send an image(s) and some text explaining what the coin is or why the coin is one of your favorites to the editor by clicking here:  Our Favorite Errors 


Our Favorite Errors ...
1995-P 25c Laminated Clad Layer Folded Over
Before Strike


Photo © Ken Potter 2004


Photo © Ken Potter 2004

    July 17, 2006 -- Ken Watson's 1944-D Lincoln cent (featured below) that consists partially of a hinged layer of  laminated metal that was folded back either before or after the strike reminded me of one of my favorite errors.  I actually do not collect many errors -- just those that tickle my fancy for one reason or another.  I found this one at a coin show at a rather reasonable price and decided to keep it in my collection.  It is odd in that most clad layers that laminate, actually break away from the core and expose an area of copper.  On this one we can see that the outer clad layer actually split from within itself.  It was then folded over not once but twice and then struck.

Members are invited to send images of their favorite errors to be featured in this column.  Send an image(s) and some text explaining why the coin is one of your favorites to the editor by clicking here:  Our Favorite Errors 


Recent Finds ...
A VERY Special Susan B. Anthony dollar!
by Rick Emery - CONECA Assistant Webmaster
Images by Mike Diamond


Image courtesy of Mike Diamond

    April 30, 2007 -- Audie Higareda, is a Vietnam veteran who was severely wounded in 1970. His wounds would get aggravated and put him in the hospital for extended periods of time and during one of those periods his kind wife brought coins and a 10x magnifier to see what he could find ...

See The Rest Of The Article   


Recent Finds ...
PCGS Certifies Presidential Dollar
Lettered-Edge Planchet 


Photo courtesy of Professional Coin Grading Service

    March 17, 2007 -- Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, California has announced that it has certified the "first reported" Washington dollar planchet with a lettered-edge!  The piece was found by Ray and Mary Smith of Fort Collins, Colorado and was submitted to PCGS after Coin World advised the couple that PCGS was offering a reward to the first person submitting one.  The reward was $2,500.00! 

See The PCGS Story Here 

See The Coins.About.Com Story Here

See The Numismatic News Story Here


  Recent Finds ...
Three More Oregon 25c DDR Varieties Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2006/Coin courtesy of Blaine Coffey

    October 13, 2006 -- Three new doubled-die Oregon quarters join the initial find reported in Coin World and Numismatic News last month. Like the first variety, all were found in mint sets issued by the U.S. Mint, and all are Philadelphia issues.  News of the latest finds appeared in the October 16, 2006 issue of Coin World and on the Numismatic New website.

See The Full Story

See The Illustrated Oregon Listings


Recent Finds ...
Doubled Die Oregon State Quarter Found!

    September 16, 2006 -- Troy Watkins of Garrett, Ky., who was first to report a Minnesota doubled die, has now found a very significant doubled die reverse on an Oregon quarter!  The variety shows best as strongly doubled branches shifted to the south of the stronger primary design on the tall evergreen tree in the foreground to the right of the coin design. It also shows some doubling at the base of the highest relief areas of the rocky shoreline of the north-northeast rim of Crater Lake.  Stories on the variety can be found in the September 25 issue of Coin World and in the September 26 issue of Numismatic News.  

See The Rest Of The Story


Recent Finds ...
Proof  Minnesota Quarter Doubled Die Found!

    September 16, 2006 -- Since the last update on doubled dies found on Minnesota quarters, 15 more varieties have been added to the list! Fourteen of the newest finds are on the Philadelphia issue (bringing it to a total of 39) while our 15th variety added to this week’s list is the very first find on a 2005-S proof coin.  Stories on the Proof quarter can be found in the September 18, 2006 issue of Coin World and in the September 26 issue of Numismatic News.

See The Rest Of The Story


Recent Finds ...
PCGS Will Certify Minnesota Quarter Varieties


Photo © Ken Potter 2006 / Coin courtesy of Jennifer Snyder
Portions of the tree nearest the center of this image is doubled out
into the field on this "Extra Tree" variety found in a Mint Set.

    August 13, 2006 -- The Professional Coin Grading Service of Newport Beach, Calif., has announced that it will begin grading and attributing the 2005-P Minnesota state quarter doubled dies that have been found in recent weeks. These varieties were reported in front-page stories in the July 18 and Aug. 8 issues of Numismatic News. Additionally, since the Aug. 8 story was published, three new doubled die varieties have been found, including one in a government-issued mint set.

See The Rest Of The Numismatic News Story Here

Additional Photos Can Be Seen Here


Recent Finds ...
2005-S Silver Proof KS 25c
More Of The Hoof-Shaped Die Dent Variety Found!


Click On Image For A Close-Up Of The Dent

Photo © Ken Potter 2006 / Coin courtesy of Vincent Burke

     October 3, 2006 -- CONECA member Tony Kleczynski has updated his finds from three to ten of the 2005-S Silver Kansas proof quarters with the hoof-like die dent!  He originally purchased ten set, keeping three for himself and passing out the other seven to family members.  In the interviening weeks he checked with others and learned that they all had sets containing the variety!

    September 19, 2006 -- CONECA member Tony Kleczynski reports finding three of the 2005-S Silver Kansas proof quarters with the hoof-like die dent!  He said: "While getting caught up on my reading, I came across the 2005 Minnesota doubled die variety article and started to look at the mint sets I have to see if I had any of these varieties. For the heck of it I started with the Silver Proof sets only to find that all three sets had the "hoof" die dent on the Kansas quarter."  He wondered if it was a common or rare variety but so far all the reports we have are what you see here!  That'll make 'em rare so far!  How do you like your steak? KP

    July 15, 2005  -- CONECA member Billy Crawford saw the above item and sent the following:  "FYI -- Chris Machuga of Florida sent me three (3) of the 2005-S Silver Proof Kansas Quarters that have the "Hoof" die dent. He found them in  the 11-coin sets he ordered directly from the Mint. I will be mentioning  his finds in my upcoming September/October issue of online Die Variety News magazine. You mentioned on the CONECA web site about reporting  additional finds and [I] wanted to pass this bit of information on to you. He reported them to me about a month ago." KP

    July 4, 2006 -- Vincent Burke of California found a significantly large, curved, almost horse hoof-shaped die dent on the rear hindquarter of the bison on a 2005-S silver proof Kansas quarter. He found it in a complete 11-piece silver proof set.  The variety is significantly larger in area than the die dents (or die gouges) found on the two well-known 2004-D Wisconsin quarters discovered some time ago and popularized under the nicknames "High Leaf" and "Low Leaf."  It also appears that the Kansas variety is many times rarer than either of the Wisconsin pieces as none have been reported to this author since it was first publicized in a front page story in the December 6, 2005 issue of Numismatic News.   Anybody finding any of these is encouraged to report them to CONECA!  KP

See the Numismatic News Story Here
See More Images Here  


Recent Finds ...
George Washington "Golden" Dollar
Sports Die Gouge


Photos © Ken Potter 2007/Coin Courtesy of Jim Susack

    March 20, 2007 -- With all the big news on the George Washington "golden" dollars focusing on the edge errors, it is easy to overlook the fact that the normal run of die cracks, die chips, die clashes, etc., are being found on this series just like on other coins.  One of the more interesting die varieties to come along (or what some would insist is a die error) is a Philadelphia issue of the coin with two parallel die gouges running from the numeral "1" of the denomination down to the southeast into Liberty's gown.  Jim Susack of New Jersey noticed the variety while searching the coin for errors.

See The Numismatic News Story Here


Recent Finds ...
2006 Lincoln Doubled Die Found
Second Strong Variety Reported For Year!
by Ken Potter -- NLG


Listed by CONECA as DDO-003 (3-O-IV+VIII)
Images © Ken Potter 2007

    March 09, 2007 -- Dennis White of Louisville, Kentucky sent in a beautiful example of a recently discovered 2006 Doubled Die Obverse Lincoln cent!  It is the second strong variety for the date/denomination reported in the last few months!  While many other doubled dies have been listed for the obverse of the 2006 cent by various listing services, all were minor until a doubled die obverse boasting a widely separated Doubled Earlobe was reported by Wendell Carper in January of this year.  This newer variety is of a more classic appearance with doubling showing best on the date, LIBERTY and IN GOD WE TRUST ...

    March 27, 2007 -- Update:  It's official!  The variety is now listed by CONECA!  After viewing the coin, CONECA 20th Century Variety Coin Attributer, James Wiles and I both agreed that what we saw on the coin was definite off set hub doubling (Class IV) along with strong evidence of tilted hub doubling (Class VIII).  The off set is obvious while evidence of a tilted hub can be seen in the extreme thickness or elongation of the designer's initials VDB and thickness (almost as a smear) on portions on LIBERTY.  The tilt is reasoned to be the cause the off set.  It is now listed by CONECA as DDO-003 (3-O-IV+VIII).

See Rest Of Story by Ken Potter

See Another Story On The Same Variety by Robert "BJ" Neff and Robert Piazza


Recent Finds ...
2006 Doubled Ear Lincoln Cent Found!


Images © Ken Potter 2007

    March 03, 2007 -- Wendell Carper of PA found the first strong doubled die obverse reported for the 2006 Lincoln cent!  The coin boasts a Lincoln portrait with a strongly doubled earlobe with the secondary lobe fully displaced from its point of origin to the southwest on Lincoln’s upper neck.  Significant doubling can also be seen in the lower areas of Lincoln’s beard.  Wendell, found this one while looking through a handful of cents back in August of last year and reported it on January 27 of this year.  It is the only example he found of this variety so far.

    The CONECA Variety Master Listing  carries two other doubled die obverses for the 2006 cent and both are described as exhibiting a medium spread.  Other variety coin examiners have also listed a number of 2006 cents with hub doubled obverses and all that have been published so far have exhibited minor spreads or thickening.

    This new doubled ear variety has been assigned an "FS" listing number of FS-01-2006-101 by J.T. Stanton and will be included in future editions of the Cherrypickers' Guide To Rare Die Varieties by Bill Fivaz and Stanton.  More information and images on the variety can be found in the next issue of Numismatic News and Coin World.

    Note:  Right after the NN article was submitted to the publisher last week, word of a second strong 2006 doubled die began to circulate on the Internet that also appears to be of major significance.  This one is of a more classic appearance with what appears to be off set hub type of doubling with some tilt on the date, LIBERTY and IGWT and possibly other areas.  We have one on the way and hope to show it soon!


Recent Finds ...
Frank Leone FUN Show Finds
All Photos ©Frank Leone 2007

    March 02, 2007 -- CONECA Errorscope editor, Frank Leone located some pretty nice Shield nickels at the Florida United Numismatists Convention last January. He said: "Here are pics of two shield nickels I picked up the FUN show. None of these were cherrypicked - they were all purchased as varieties. The 1872 is a repunched date south.  The 1868 is a minor retained cud. Note that there are many hundreds of different dies for 1868 alone. The cracks are of little or no added value at this size. The 1873 is one of the kings of Shield nickel doubled dies."  Frank didn't say were he obtained the 1873 doubled die but it is listed by Fivaz-Stanton as 05-1873-103 (the old number is FS#5c-008.8).


This 1868 shows a minor retained cud variety with multiple die cracks.
The retained cud is pointed out by the red arrow.


A closer look at the die cracks through the date


A repunched date variety


This 1873 has a strong doubled die obverse
Notice the shift in the shield horizontal lines and some of the upper left side of the shield


A close up of the 1873 doubled die


Recent Finds ...
Unattributed Partial Collar Liberty 5c Found

by Russ Vander Meulen - CONECA Member
Photos courtesy of Russ Vander Meulen


Here's a side view of the partial collar (sometimes referred to as a railroad rim)


One small die crack comes off the very right of the rim cud


A second die crack is much stronger and from the rim into the letter 'O' of the word 'OF'.

   March 01, 2007 --  I just wanted to share this find with the CONECA gang.  Last summer I purchased a small lot of coins through a well known website. Upon receiving the coins, I did a quick inventory and then stored them away. Several months had passed before I finally decided to examine the coins more closely. I pulled the lot from storage and began researching. Upon examining the coins, I came across this beautiful 1907 "V" Nickel. Sensing that something wasn't quite right with the obverse rim on the coin, I removed it from its 2x2 holder. To say it best, I was a bit puzzled as to exactly what I was looking at. I immediately logged onto a numismatic chat site that I frequent and recruited the help of Roger Yount, a specialist in mint errors. I made arrangements that same day with Roger to mail the coin to him in hopes of gaining his professional opinion. The coin was quickly returned to me with a detailed description stating that the coin was a Partial Collar mint error. He then continued on with an explanation as to how this type of error occurs. Roger also pointed out that there was a nice "rim cud" on the reverse along with two bonus die cracks as well. As you can see, this coin is a real eye treat for the error enthusiast.

    Editors Comment: What a find! A beautiful example of a rim cud, two prominent die cracks on the reverse at about 10:30 and 1:00 o'clock and a railroad rim. We are always looking for reports like this for the website!


Recent Finds ...
CONECA Member Finds Strike-Thru 5c


Photos © Ken Potter 2006/Coin Courtesy of Vira Horwith

    August 24, 2006 -- CONECA member Vira Horwith is back again with another 2006-P Jefferson nickel with an error.  This one appears to have been struck through Mint "Goop" -- a combination of grease, oil, dust and metal filings that sometimes collects around the tooling of the press and works its way into the dies. While these are not always considered major errors or varieties they are fun to find and collect.


Recent Finds ...
Leaf-Shaped Die Dent Found On Minn. 25c


Photo © Ken Potter 2006/Coin Courtesy of Dave Serbonich

     August 20, 2006 --  Whenever folks start looking more closely at an issue for a new discovery like a doubled die, they tend to find other thing too.  The search for 2005-P&D Minnesota quarters with the "Extra Tree" doubled dies is no different.  Lots of minor variety types and strike doubling damage is being found and submitted.  Perhaps one of the more interesting that came in is a leaf-shaped die dent that appears in the field over the second evergreen tree from the right of the state outline on this issue.  One can see evidence of metal displacement that surrounds the dent as a sort of trench all around its perimeter.  When a die is dented metal is of course pushed down.  In reaction, metal may be displaced upwards outside the perimeters of the dent. When the die is used to strike a coin the recessed dent is evidenced on the coin as raised metal while the raised area of metal displacement on the die shows as a shallow trench around the dent.  We often see this effect around Mintmarks that were punched into the dies prior to the 1990's.  So far, at least three persons searching for the Minnesota doubled dies have found examples of these die dents with the first one coming in from Colleen Prebish on August 7 and another one coming in from Dave Serbonich.  


Recent Finds ...
Member Reports First 2006-P Jefferson 5c Die Clash


Photo © Ken Potter 2006/Coin Courtesy of Vira Horwith


Photo © Ken Potter 2006/Coin Courtesy of Vira Horwith

    July 15, 2006 -- CONECA member Vira Horwith reports finding the first die clash found on a 2006-P Jefferson nickel that has been reported to us.  There is also some minor die chipping within the first bay from the left.  We show two images shot with the lighting from different angles just to illustrate how different features can look on a coin depending on the lighting when shot.  While these are not major errors or varieties they are fun to find and collect.


Recent Finds ...
1966 Laminated Reverse Cent Found Still Circulating


Photo © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Pat Cappello

    July 15, 2006 -- Pat Cappello of New York found this 1966 Lincoln cent with a deep lamination on the reverse.  While it is not considered a particularly major type of error it is nonetheless a neat coin to find while searching through circulation change.  


Recent Finds ...
1968-S Proof Inverted MM JFKs Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 1997 / Coin courtesy of Joe W. Crowder
A look at one of the Crowder Specimens


Photo courtesy of Marty Kuklinski
A look at one of the Kuklinski Specimens

   July 12, 2006 -- Marty Kuklinski of Northern Illinois reports finding four 1968-S proof sets containing the rare Kennedy Half dollar with an inverted Mintmark.  He's been searching for them ever since he read the report on them in the PCGS Library in 2002 and has looked through thousands of sets before encountering these.  The variety was first reported by Joe W. Crowder of Tennessee who first noticed them in the year of issue but said nothing until 1997.  The variety was first publicized in articles appearing in Numismatic News, Coin World and Collectors Universe ( PCGS Library) from 1997 through 1999 and later in follow up articles in Coin World. In each case when I wrote about the original find, I expected there to be many more reported.  However, such was not to be the case!  Up until now, only two additional finds had been reported!  At this point we now have a total of 11 reported.  That is an average of just one find per year since they were first reported!  Where are they all?  KP

Read More About Kurlinski's Here

Read More About Crowder's Find Here


Recent Finds ...
Collector Finds Probable Doubled Die Minn. 25c!


Photo © Ken Potter 2006 / Coin courtesy of Troy Watkins

    July 11, 2006 -- According to a story in the July 18 issue of Numismatic News, (mailed out to subscribers on July 7), Troy Watkins of Garrett, Ky., has reported what specialists believe may turn out to be the first known doubled-die state quarter.  His find, on the reverse of a 2005-P Minnesota quarter, shows what is best described as a possible section of an evergreen tree floating free in the field within a stand of trees to the right of the state outline. This area of "design" represents the virtual dead center of the coin’s design.  This is an important key to its possible attribution because specialists who feel the coin has possibilities of being a doubled die believe it could be ... 

See The Rest Of The Story Here


Recent Finds ...
The First 1999 Error Coin Reported!


Photos © Ken Potter 1999/Coin Courtesy of Warren Robertson

    June 27, 2006 -- In reading the title of this entry, your first reaction is probably one of, "how can that be!"  After all, we've already passed the half way mark in 2006!  In actuality, it is not such a recent find but it is the first error that was reported to me on a 1999 dated coin, and of course, the first one to be reported to me on a States Quarter!  Warren Robertson of Michigan reported this coin to me on January 24, 1999 and it represents a strike-through error where some apparent Mint grease covered areas of both the obverse and reverse as shown in the lighter areas that surround the central designs.  It's not major but it still holds the title of being the first 1999 dated error shown to me -- for whatever that's worth!  In fact it was in my hands before Coin World, Numismatic News or any other publication that I know of reported upon a 1999 dated error!  Neat! KP


Recent Finds ...
The Devil's "666" Nickel Found!


Image & Coin Courtesy of Leonard Munier

    June 27, 2006 -- We normally don't get excited enough to report upon most minor strike-through errors but every once in awhile one comes along that is interesting ... or in this case shall we say in this case ... odd enough to highlight.  Leonard Munier of Goldsboro, North Carolina found this strike-through nickel in change and noticed that when it was viewed with the date inverted it appears to read as "666" or what some refer to as the "mark of the devil."  The 1 of the date was apparently clogged with "mint goop" preventing that digit from forming up on the coin during striking.


Recent Finds ...
Bar Owner Finds Currency Error


Click on Image For Larger View

    May 30, 2006 -- Steven Baskinger, owner of a bar in Little Falls, NJ was counting up receipts at the end of the evening several weeks ago when his eye caught sight of an odd $10 bill that turned out to be a rather nice error.  As one can see the green seal is shifted way down to the lower edge of the note covering most of ARS of DOLLARS.  We show the error bill with a normal bill below it for comparison.  According to Dr. Frederick J. Bart, author of United States Paper Money Errors - A Comprehensive Catalog & Price Guide, it is called a Dropped Seal error.  He said it occurs "when the block used to apply the green Treasury seal slips from its intended position and contacts the uncut sheet in a lower than intended position."  He also stated that there will undoubtedly be more but this is the first example of this error he has seen on the brightly colored 2004 Series notes since they were released on March 2nd of this year.  Learn more about the new $10 bills here> New $10


Recent Finds ...
1992 Philadelphia “Close AM” Cent Discovered!


Images courtesy of Ken Potter/Coins Courtesy of Parker Ogilvie


The Close AM Reverse features the M of AMERICA shifted left into the A.
Frank Gasparro's designer's initials FG are spaced well away from the Memorial building.

    May 28, 2006 -- CONECA member and Coin World columnist Ken Potter reported in the June 5, issue of Coin World that a Philadelphia minted 1992 Lincoln cent struck with a “Close AM” reverse has been discovered!  Parker Ogilvie of MA found it while searching circulation change in about mid March and has turned down offers of up to $1500 for the coin sight-unseen.  It grades almost uncirculated with pimply red surfaces. According to Potter, all years of circulation and proof Lincoln Memorial cents dated prior to 1993 carry a reverse design style that exhibits the AM of AMERICA spaced wider apart to a greater or lesser degree. To date 1993 is the only year apparent that the Close AM style was intended for use on both circulation and proof cents. From that point forward, the new Close AM style dies were reserved for dies intended to strike circulation coins and the older Wide AM style was maintained for the production of proof cents, though a few mix-ups did occur.  To be 100% sure it was actually what it appeared to be, the coin was examined microscopically to make sure it was not created in a like manner to the often encountered double-headed or double-tailed novelty coins that are created by altering two genuine coins to make one.  Its weight was also checked.  It showed no evidence of alteration and weighed correctly at 2.5 grams.


The Wide AM Reverse features the M of AMERICA centered between the A & E.
Frank Gasparro's designer's initials FG are in close to the Memorial building.

CONECA member and Coin World columnist John A. Wexler first described these design style variations in his January 22, 2001 lead story were he announced that a 2000 dated business strike cent had been discovered mated with one of the Wide AM reverse dies. Presumably, it had inadvertently been processed as a business strike die and got used as such. Soon afterward folks began to search all Lincoln cents dated from 1994 on, and in short order, specimens dated 1998 and 1999 were found with the so-called proof style reverses. (Many refer to this design style as a “proof style” or “proof hub reverse” though the terms are technically misnomers since this design style, [which is the sixth], had been the standard for both circulation strikes and proofs from 1989 through 1992.) By about mid-2001 all three of the post-1994 business strike dates currently known with a Wide AM reverse were identified. However, collector Colin Kusch, decided to look further wondering if the Close AM dies believed to have been introduced in 1993 might have actually seen a small run at the end of 1992. By early December 2001 he had discovered what would be the rarest of the business strike reverse style varieties to date, the infamous 1992-D with a Close AM reverse of which just a few are known. Now Ogilvie  has added the Philadelphia Mint issue into the mix to vie for the title of "the rarest."  Potter's feature also examines pricing of the various dates, grading service population reports on the 1992-D Close AM, the recent discoveries of the1998-S and 1999-S Close AM Proof cents and he provides a list of dates of where other of these varieties might still be hiding undiscovered. 


Recent Finds ...
Ike Dollar Features Rare Flip Over 2nd Strike!

    April 1, 2006 -- Jim Essence of Jim's Coins & Stamps located in Madison, WI , sent in the images of the Double Struck Ike Dollar shown above.  He said:   " It is a 197X-D (probably 1971 evidenced by the coin design) flip over double struck Ike. The second strike is about 90% off center and "flipped over" between the strikes. While Ike double strikes are scarce, this is the only flip over double strike with the second strike off center that I have seen or heard of."  Jim offers a monthly catalog of error coins for auction and his contact information can be seen further down this column in the Commercial News section.


Recent Finds ...
Collector Bags 1847 Large Cent Error!



Photos © Ken Potter 2006/Coin Courtesy of John Crawford

    March 05, 2006 - When collector, John Crawford of Virginia purchased a deteriorating brown bag of unattributed mixed date large cents, which included a number of culls such as holed-coins, he never expected to find a major Off Center mixed in!  But that is exactly what happened!  His story is presented by Ken Potter on the cover page of this week's issue of Coin World (dated March 13 and mailed to subscribers on February 28).  Wouldn't it be nice if we could all get that lucky and find a nice cull like that!


Recent Finds ...
The Bird That Didn't Get Away!


Click On Image For Larger View


   
February 5, 2005 -- Kevin Frank Sr. D.D.S., wrote to say that he has been a collector of 1921 Peace dollars for several decades.  His story is presented as follows:  "I have by chance run across a very unique coin that might be of some interest to your readers. I was 'culling' through my coins with the help of my local coin dealer, Jim Miller of Statesboro, Ga. During this process, it was noticed that something was wrong when the coin was flipped over during the process of determining which coins would be good candidates to send off for 3rd party encapsulation. The reverse of the coin shows the eagle laying completely horizontally.... just as if a hunter knocked it off it's perch with a perfect shot. A regular position of the eagle's head is pointing towards 1 o'clock. This one is rotated a seemingly 60 degrees clockwise with the eagle's head pointing to the 3 o'clock position. It is believed that this is the most rotated 1921 Peace dollar known. Another interesting point is that the "experts" always deem the reverse is rotated although truly it could be either side of the coin. The coin was sent to ANACS for authentication. Images are included for review."
    The author welcomes any questions or comments. He can be reached at drmickey@bellsouth.net 


 

Recent Finds ...
1865/1865 3c Silver Featured
Images courtesy of  Gary Reeves


Click In Image For Larger View


Click On Image For Larger View

    February 1, 2006 -- Gary Reeves sent in images of an 1865 3c Nickel on which he found eight die breaks on the reverse.  Ohhhh, it also has a monster repunched date.  This is the one listed in The Cherrypickers' Guide To Rare Die Varieties by Bill Fivaz and J.T. Stanton as FS# 3c - 003.  They also make mention of the clashed dies that we can see on Reeves specimen.


Recent Finds ...

Crawford Finds 2000 "Wide AM" Variety
 On Cut-Out 1c


Images courtesy of  Billy Crawford

    February 04, 2006 -- Billy Crawford wrote about a recent circulation find that certainly underscores the fact, varieties are where you find them and that true Cherrypickers never leave a stone unturned.  Billy said:  "[I] came across this while going thru circulated rolls from my bank.  Before I flipped the coin over to the reverse -- I was thinking to myself that the odds would have to be extremely high against this being a Type II [Wide AM] reverse.  Lo and behold -- it was!  Figure the odds?  Phew!!!  I'm glad it wasn't a 1999 Type II or 1992-D Type I.  Then I would have really been upset!  Have a great day ...
    Nice find Billy!  It's a real conversation piece!


Recent Finds ...

Now It's A Matte Unc 2005-P Ocean In View 
Doubled Die Obverse Nickel!


Photo © Ken Potter 2005 / Set courtesy of  Lonnie Helton

    January 1, 2006 -- 2006 is starting out with a big bang!  As if it wasn't enough for collectors to find doubled die Bison nickels in the Wayward Journey Nickel Sets late in 2005, now they are scrambling to find them on the Ocean In View Nickels in the same sets!  Eagle-eyed eBay seller, Steve Santangelo of Cameo-Coin-Company was the first to report one to me and the first to put one up on eBay to auction off.  CONECA members, Billy Crawford and Ken Potter have both written stories on these new discoveries that have appeared in the January 3 Numismatic News and January 9 issues of  Coin World respectively (while dated in 2006 both publications were actually mailed in late 2005 and started arriving to subscribers in the last days of  December).  Both authors also have condensed versions of their stories on their own websites that you may accessed from the links below.  We ask that members keep up the reports!  We also wonder why none the varieties have been found in the standard 22-coin Mint sets which also contain the identical Matte finish type of nickels.  Has anybody looked?  We'd like to hear from those that have taken the time and get your reports on what you find or do not find!  Good luck and above all -- have and enjoyable, healthful and prosperous 2006!

Billy Crawford's Story
Ken Potter's Story


Recent Finds ...

Matte Unc 2005-P Bison 
Doubled Die Obverse Nickel Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2005 / Coin courtesy of  Lonnie Helton

    December 05, 2005 -- Collectors who believed that the Mint stopped making doubled dies in the late 1990s are in for an eye-opener!  Long-time collector, Lonnie Helton of Ohio found a new doubled die obverse variety when he opened his 2005 Westward Journey Nickel Series Coin Sets on the day they arrivedHe ordered three sets in the last week of September and received them on October 11th; all contained the doubled die on the Philadelphia issue Bison coin.  This is an error type that the Philadelphia Mint has repeatedly denied can be made with the current single-squeeze hubbing presses in use there since the late 1990s.  Ken Potter reported upon the variety in a feature article in the November 7, 2005 issue of Coin World where the story first broke.  More details on the story and enlarged images of the coin are available on Potter article on his website.

See The Story Here

Update

    December 19, 2005 -- Lonnie Helton, who was the first person to report the 2005-P doubled die obverse Bison nickels reported on above writes to say: " I do not know if you had been watching the market on these nickels, but in case you have not been, there have been three sold on Ebay. The 1st nickel sold for $511.00; I then listed one of the discovery pieces and it sold for $550.00. Another listing just ended and it brought $256.00.  All 3 coins sold were in the raw state."  Thanks Lonnie for the update!  (We will supply the auction numbers as soon as they are made available to us).

Additional Update

    December 24, 2005 -- A total of seven pieces of the Bison doubled die obverse have now traded on eBay with a downward trend in price.  Finders are reporting them located in Westward Journey Nickel Sets purchased from the Mint over a period of months.  Even some recently ordered groups of sets delivered in late December are being reported with some containing doubled dies.  The reports are coming in from just a very few finders but those who are reporting are usually finding more than one doubled die in each group ordered (though some groups, perhaps most, contain none).  There are hints that there is more than one variety involved including at least one for the 2005-P Ocean In View five-cent piece found in the Westward Journey sets and maybe two varieties for the Bison coin.   So far many of Ocean In View pieces are being reported found in the same sets as the Bison doubled die obverse!  Keep your eyes peeled for stories in greater detail on these developments that will appear in both Coin World and Numismatic News written by CONECA members!  


Recent Finds ...

1998-S Proof Lincoln 1c
Discovered w/Business Strike Type Reverse!


Photos © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Michelle Smith
This Is The Business Strike Style Reverse w/ Close AM

    May 1, 2005 -- Lightning has struck twice for owners of modern proof sets seeking potentially rare Lincoln cent varieties! Michelle Smith of Don's Coin Exchange in Enid, Oklahoma has reported the discovery of a proof 1998-S Lincoln cent struck with a reverse die of a style intended for circulation strikes. The discovery follows right on the heals of our report of the same type of die pairing on a 1999-S Lincoln cent which was featured below.  Smith's find was the lead story in the May 3 issue of Coin World and was featured in the May 3 issue of Numismatic News.  The set has already been sold on eBay were it closed at $1091.66 on May 1st.  It was sold in the original mint sealed set.


1999-S Proof Lincoln 1c
Discovered w/Business Strike Type Reverse!


Photos © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Jerrod Felder
This Is The Business Strike Style Reverse w/ Close AM


Photos © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Ken Potter
This is the Proof Style Reverse w/Wide AM

    April 07, 2005 -- Two University of North Carolina students have made numismatic history! Adam Friedman and Jerrod Felder have found a proof 1999-S Lincoln cent with a business strike-style reverse in a 1999 silver proof set. In recent years, proof Lincoln cents have borne a reverse design style that exhibits the “AM” of AMERICA spaced wide apart, while their business-strike counterparts have exhibited a design style with the AM letters virtually connected (among other variations). The discovery was the lead story in the April 12 issue of Numismatic News and April 11 issue of Coin World.   Examples of this coin has already traded for prices exceeding $900 in the eBay Internet Auctions.

See Numismatic News Article Here


Dropped Letter Nickels Found!




Photos © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Kelsey Cappello

    May 01, 2005 -- Fourteen year old Kelsey Cappello of New York hit pay-dirt when her persistence paid off and she found a 2005-D Bison five cent piece with a rare Dropped Letter error. On her coin you can clearly see a letter "T" well out into the field between the Jefferson portrait and the word TRUST. Cappello calls it her "Touchdown Nickel" because of the T and the fact it is her first major error find.
    The "Dropped Letter" is a relatively rare error type with its origins in the common "Filled Die" error.   When debris, (often referred to by error collectors as "mint goop" or "grease"), clog a die, it may after a few strikes, become compressed within cavities of the die such as numerals or letters.  Even after the offending material has been dispersed from the field of the die through striking coins, it may remain intact within these recesses.  Her coin was featured on the front page of the May 3, 2005 issue of Numismatic News were the full story can be seen.  Great find Kelsey!


Photo © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Robert Corriveau

    May 01, 2005 -- While on the subject of Dropper Letter errors on the new five-cent pieces we should mention that Robert Corriveau of Thompson, Connecticut found a neat one one the obverse of the 2004-D Keelboat commemorative.  Like Cappello's find, his was also featured on the front page of Numismatic News.  It was also featured in Coin World's, Collectors' Clearinghouse.


Recent Finds ...

Monster Cud & Floating Die Clash



Photos courtesy of Daniel D. Bonnett
Close-up of Floating Die Clash


Photo courtesy of Daniel D. Bonnett
Pre-Cud Die Crack

     May 09, 2005 -- CONECA member Daniel D. Bonnett sent in a beautiful (1987) No Date Cud on a Lincoln cent.  Interestingly, after the chuck of die that created the Cud broke away, it fell in a position to be struck by the obverse die and have the rim and part of the date from its face impressed into the obverse die.  We can see this as a mirror image of the norm on the left side of the coin!  Since we did not have an official term for this effect, Mike Diamond suggested calling it a "Floating Die Clash" which sounds pretty descriptive to me.  (Design Transfer was also considered but it was already in use for another error-variety type as described in our glossary.)  Bonnett was also able to supply an example of the coin in a stage with the die crack the led up to the cud.  Many refer to a die crack like this as a pre-cud die crack.  Contrary to what some have been stating lately in many online auctions, cuds always involve the rim of the coin and extend inward into the field and/or design like we see here.  What many have been claiming are cuds in online auctions are more often than not, mere die chips or die breaks.


Collector Shares 1942-D/Horizontal/D Find


Photo courtesy of Vince FaGalde

    May 09, 2005 Vince FaGalde shares his recent submission of a 1942-D over Horizontal D Jefferson five-cent piece.  It is one of the CONECA Top 100 Jefferson Nickel Varieties.


Lincoln Cent Struck On
Struck Dime Found In Cash Register!


Photos courtesy of  Michelle Lee

    March 20, 2005 -- Michelle Lee of  NC shares a beautiful 11c piece that she found.  She says: 
    "I was working in a retail store and one day while going through my cash drawer I saw an odd coin. When I looked at it I thought it was a fake, maybe counterfeit but decided it was pretty cool looking so I decided to keep it. I tend to collect strange and neat looking coins but am not a "collector".  I exchanged it for a dime from my pocket, which is what the person used it as, brought it home and put it away. After a few years of it sitting in my jewelry box I decided to do some research on it to see if it was real. That was when I found out about the whole mint error coin collecting world. I have been searching the internet for three years for a coin like it and have not found one like it. Thinking it may be worth something I decided to email some pictures to a few people to find out an approximate worth and found that is was a highly desirable coin among error coin collectors. I am now in the process of getting an information packet from PCGS, I joined as a member last week, so I can send it out to be graded and authenticated. I stumbled upon the CONECA website and thought it may be an interesting piece for here as it is the only site I was able to find ANY information on the "11 cent piece."
    Nice find Michelle!!!!


Neat Dropped Letter!

    March 24, 2005 -- CONECA member Daniel D. Bonnett, shows us a very interesting example of a "Dropped Letter" error on an 1891 Indian Head cent.  The "A" dropped from a "filled A" of from AMERICA on the obverse.  Interestingly, it also sports a nice repunched date apparent as a 18/18 North and perhaps more repunching on the 91 that we can't see in the photo.  It may be the same 1891/1891 listed by Richard Snow as S3 in his Flying Eagle & Indian Cents book and listed by Larry Steve and Kevin Flynn in their  Flying Eagle And Indian Cent Die Varieties as FND-002.   To learn more about "Dropped Letters" and Repunched Dates Visit the Glossary


New 1994 Doubled Die Rev.
Lincoln Cent Found!


Photo © Ken Potter 2005 / Coin courtesy of  Brian Allen

    March 06, 2005 -- CONECA member, Brian Allen once again shows us that there are still some excellent finds out in circulation for those who take the time to look.  Last time he sent in a circulation find it was one of the famous 1984 Doubled Die cents (which features the doubled ear).  This time he's jumped up a decade to 1994 and found a nice doubled die reverse!  The variety shows strong continuous secondary impressions of one flute from each of the final two columns shifted west within the tenth and 11th bays of the Memorial building. It is very similar to CONECA's DDR-001 which is listed in the Cherrypickers’ Guide To Rare Die Varieties by Bill Fivaz and J.T. Stanton as FS#1c-039.9.   However, CONECA's DDR-001 is different than this new one in that it shows secondary images of two flutes with a more or less slapdash appearance within the last two bays (and some slight traces within the third from last bay on earlier die states).   This new one has been listed by three listers so far that I'm aware of including John Wexler as WDDR-007, Billy Crawford as CDDR-009 and by me in the Variety Coin Register as VCR#3/DDR#3.   We have not yet seen it appear in the CONECA files but we will include that number too as soon as we get it.


More Recent Finds ...

Collector Finds Error Eagle & Proof 5c


1998 Silver Eagle Strike Thru Reverse


Images courtesy of Dave Possien
2004-S Proof Jeff Struck Thru Something Below Jaw

    October 09, 2004 --  Collector Dave Possien of Tennessee wrote and said that after reading two articles in Numismatic News on error coins, "I began checking for mint errors/variations ... and am still at it ... [it's] more fun than I've ever had in the hobby."  He sent the images of the two errors he's found so far and is looking forward to looking through 40 rolls of "pocket change pennies" and a number of rolls of Peace and Keelboats nickels that he obtained.  Alan Herbert quoted an approximate value of about $40 to $50 to him for the Silver Eagle error to which this editor concurs.


1984 Doubled Ear Found In Circulation!


Image by Brian Allen

    December 12, 2004 -- CONECA member, Brian Allen shows us that there are still some excellent finds out in circulation for those who take the time to look.  Here is a 1984 Double Die Obverse featuring the doubled beard, ear and bow tie that he found a short time back when he has some spare time.  He also found a 1983 doubled die obverse in the same batch!


Stanton Finds Double Struck Cent!


Image by John Stanton

    January 23, 2005 -- John Stanton of West Virginia reports finding a 1994 Lincoln cent that was double struck!  The first strike was normal and for the second strike the coin fell back into the collar in a position rotated counterclockwise from the first strike and was struck again.  He did not indicate if it had a partial collar as the overwhelming majority of this error type does but we have seen them without.   He sent it in and had it graded by ANACS as a MS65 Red.  Nice find John!


Strike Thru Found In 2003-S Proof  Set


Photo courtesy © Ken Potter 2004
Click Image For Enlargement

    August 14, 2004 --  Gordon Telschow reports finding a rather major strike through error on the 2003-S cent in a 2003-S proof set.  Another one of the sets contained a cent that with a "spike" shaped die crack running from the rim into the "V" of Lincoln's bust up through the and out again into the field were it ends next to the vest level with the bottom of the 2 of date. 


2004-P Doubled Die Peace 5c Reported

Photo courtesy © Ken Potter 2004

    July 19, 2004 -- A 2004-P Jefferson five-cent piece paired with the Peace Medal design reverse has been reported with a doubled die obverse.   It made the rounds through Billy Crawford, Ken Potter and James Wiles so far (in that order) and been attributed as a doubled die by all.  Part of the deal in getting to see it was that each attributer had to agree to keep the discovery under wraps until Jason Taylor (who orchestrated the round robin affair) gave the OK. We now have the green light!  We expect that all the attributers to examine and photograph the coin will post images.  Ones we are aware of at this time were posted by Ken Potter and  Billy Crawford can be seen at the links below.  We will provide links to others as we obtain them.

Read The Ken Potter Story Here     Read The Billy Crawford Story Here      Read Jason Taylor's Story Here


CONECA Attributes 2004 Cent As Hub Doubled Die


Photo © Ken Potter 2004

    August 30, 2004 -- James Wiles, Billy Crawford, John Wexler and Ken Potter have all independently examined a 2004 Lincoln cent and declared that it displays a hub doubled reverse!  It also bears a minor doubled die obverse that some have chose to list while others have not.  James Wiles, CONECA's 20th Century Variety Coin Attributer has listed the coin in the CONECA Registry as DDR-001/1-R-IV+VIII Offset & Tilted Hub Doubling - DDO too minor to list.  So far Billy Crawford is the only person to post  images of it on the web so for those of you interested in seeing it we recommend a visit.

See The Billy Crawford Story Here


Strike-Thru Error Won On Ebay

    December 27, 2003 -- Patrick McNulty won this neat Strike Thru error on eBay!  Strike Thru errors occur when just about anything falls between the dies (or is taxied into the dies by a planchet) and is struck into the coin.   Even though American Silver Eagles are inspected, some get out with this type of error which is by far the most common of the major errors affecting this coin type.


Massive "MAD" Scooped From eBay

    Dec. 13, 2003 -- Your webmaster occasionally cherries a good one too!  The above silver medal was offered on eBay described as an off center strike but it was in fact a "Monster" Offset Misaligned Die Strike (often referred to simply as a Misaligned Die or MAD for short).  At first glance, the fact that a good portion of both the obverse and reverse are unstruck could lead the casual observer to ascertain that it is an off center.  However, what we actually see here is the strike on one side offset (or off center if you prefer) in relation to the planchet while the design on the flip side is centered properly (though not stuck up completely across the planchet).
    Most MADs will exhibit the centered side of the coin fully or nearly fully struck up in a fairly normal fashion.  That's because most MADs fall within a narrow 2%-5% range of offset.  This small amount allows enough pressure to build up to form up most or all of the design on the centered side of the coin.
    However, in this case, the misalignment was so far off that the application of pressure to one side was only sufficient to strike design into the proximity of the reverse opposite of  where the offset (presumably the upper) die made contact (and a bit beyond).
    I got this little gem for a bit over $20 (including postage) and while it is not a "coin," it is perhaps that largest MAD I will ever own!  You can see a larger image of this one under the term: "Offset Die Misalignment" by going to the: CONECA Glossary


Neat Santa Cud Found!

    December 21, 2003 -- Here's a neat  Odd-Shaped 1oz .999 silver "Santa" ingot that was found by Ken Potter.  It boasts a cud at about the 9:00 area of the piece.


Error Collector Finds Neat Strike Thru

    October 16, 2003 -- Harriet H. of Florida sent in this neat 2001 Kentucky quarter that she found with an extensive Strike Thru error showing on both the obverse and reverse.  This one was struck by dies that were covered by "mint goop" or what is better described as a mixture of machine oil, grease, slivers of metal, dirt, etc., that collects around working machinery.
    She noticed that the word Kentucky in the song title "My Kentucky Home" had be altered to "My Ken Home" by the strike thru and decided that since your Webmaster's name is "Ken" that it belonged in his collection, and told me to keep it!  Thanks Harriet!
    BTW -- Harriet is credited with finding the first Major  Die Break "Cud" reported on a States quarter.  Sorry, but it escapes me as to which one it is ...  I'm sure somebody can refresh my memory on it as it made it into the pages of Error Trends Magazine and Coin World.

See Enlarged Photos Obv & Rev Here


Specialist Reports Misplaced Dates


View of 1889 Cent With Top Of 8 Showing In Denticles
Photo courtesy of Whaden Curtis

    October 14, 2003 -- CONECA member, Whaden Curtis sent in a batch of photos for use in the CONECA Glossary that includes (amongst other items) about a half dozen Misplaced Dates on the Indian Head cent series.  The one shown above is listed by Walter Breen as Breen-2015, by Rick Snow as S-4 and Kevin Flynn as Flynn: MPD-001.  High grade specimens will show the tops of two 8s and the top of a 9 in the denticles.  There is also some repunching of the date as 1889/89 north not shown here.  You can visit the CONECA Glossary to see more of Curtis' finds!  Look under "Misplaced Dates."


Specialists Report
2003 "Wavy Steps" Cent Finds!

   October 07, 2003 -- Simultaneous reports have came in from variety coin specialists Harold Kuykendall of Virginia and Jose H. Muñoz of Texas describing finds of 2003 cents with "wavy" or "doubled" steps that both collectors described as being similar to the effect on the steps found on a 1994 doubled die reverse Lincoln cent.  A full report and images can be found in the article posted on Ken Potter's web site with a direct link to the article found on the CONECA Articles Page in the Off Site Articles Index.


"Hang 'em High" Strike Thru Found


    Sept 07. 2003 -- Aside from "Spiked Head" die cracks, one of the more interesting finds from a proof set that has been submitted recently is a 2003-S Missouri clad quarter sent in by John AArt@ Bowers of Arizona. This coin boasts a very interesting "Strike Through@ error in the form of a Alooped@ piece of wire or strand of other material struck into the field of the coin just below and almost hanging from the arch.


"Oh, No It Ain't ...!" #32
Fake Silver Dime Blanks Still Plague Hobby
by Ken Potter -- NLG

Click On Picture To See Larger View
Photo © Ken Potter 2004

    February 26, 2006 -- Back in the late 1980s, the marketplace became flooded with hundreds of alleged silver dime blanks and planchets that boasted major errors. The bulk of the pieces turned up virtually overnight and were implied to have escaped from the U.S. Mint.  In The Error Shuttle Coin Magazine #15, (issued in the summer of 1989), this author exposed these pieces as being of a silver content lower than that of a 90% silver dime blank and thus as being something far less significant than what they were being touted as.  In terms of dollars and cents the fraud was rather insignificant but it terms of the number of dealers who were deceived by the supplier of the blanks and the number of pieces involved, it was large!  It was also a major embarrassment to an entire industry that had been so blinded by greed that it failed to heed the old axiom: if it sounds too good to be true -- it probably is. 

See The Rest Of The Story Here


New To The Web Site...

"Oh, No It Ain't ...!!" #31
"Spooned Coins" Fool Many Newcomers
by Ken Potter -- NLG

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Photos courtesy of Robert "Murphy" Tingle

    September 12, 2004 -- One of the more exotic alterations that almost all errorists will encounter at some point in their travels is what I refer to as a "Spooned Coin" (for lack of anything better to call them at this point.)  Robert "Murphy" Tingle of  New Albany, Indiana sent in images of one to share with readers.  He affectionately refers to it as his "elephant man cent."  He was told it was made, "after minting by the process called spooning.  It is smaller than a normal cent ... and the edge is very smooth and rounded, as if tapped many times by a spoon."
    In fact, that is pretty much the standard explanation given by most specialists as to how coins with this configuration are created.  As the story goes, in the days of WWI ...

Read The Rest Of The Story Here


"Oh, No It Ain't ...!!"
Fake 1967 Double Strike Reported


Click On Picture To See Enlargement 

Click On Picture To See Enlargement 

Click On Picture To See Enlargement 
Photos © Ken Potter 2005/Coin Courtesy of Chris Venna

     May 7, 2005 -- Chris Venna shares a fake Double Strike on a genuine 1967 Kennedy half dollar.  It is one of several variations that are made by hammering or squeezing in a vise, stacks of two or more coins between leather or wood.  This would be a more complicated type that would involve stacking and restacking some of the coins with new coins at least twice to arrive at this effect.

See  More Info On This Type Of Alteration


"Oh, No It Ain't ...!!" #30
A Fake Incomplete Clip Fools The Experts!
by Ken Potter -- NLG


Photo courtesy of Mike Diamond
Is it an Incomplete Clip Or Not?

    August 2004 / Installment #30 --  According to, Mike Diamond, who submitted this coin, it was one of the first "error" coins he ever purchased.  Find out why he decided it was a fake!

Read The Rest Of The Story Here


"Oh, No It Ain't ...!" #27
by Ken Potter -- NLG


Are They Strike-Thru Errors?


Photos courtesy of Audie Higareda
Broadstrikes (with no reeding)?

   March 11, 2004 / Installment #27 --  Obviously, it doesn't take much to figure out these items are not what they might appear to be at first glance -- or they wouldn't be in this column.  So just what are they?   The answer is really simple, yet coins like these frequently puzzle folks when they are encountered in circulation or rolls ...

Find Out What The Featured Coins Are Here


What Is It? ...

Struck On Foreign Or Sintered 10c Planchet?
by Ken Potter -- NLG


Photo © Ken Potter 2004

October 16, 2004 -- The subject coin appears to have started out as a normal silver dime blank.  It then acquired a heavy sintered coating of copper from cent blanks while stuck in an annealing oven.  The blank was then run through the upset mill (to raise the rims) and was later struck by cent dies.  However before making this call, we'd like feedback from readers that may be able reaffirm our findings or add other thoughts or information to the equation.  Note:  Fred Weinberg had determined the coin to be a heavy copper wash on a Cuban planchet.  More later as we get the details.

See The Rest Of The Story Here


Members Write ...
Is It Really A "First Strike?"

    March 25, 2005 -- As a long time dealer and collector of numismatic coinage (41+years), and ANA LM , And CONECA LM , I am saddened by the new so-called "FIRST STRIKE" label being attached to bullion coinage minted before a certain time limit being marketed and sold as "first strikes". This is a very bad precedent to fool around with, in my opinion. I beg all advertisers to clearly distance your coin descriptions, and to stop using this new and unusual method to create this new marketing tool from confusing an already confused Public about grading in general. Actually this type of labeling should not even be "a grade". An early striking of coins by new dies made anytime during the year are usually proof-like in appearance on both sides and should be the only coins that can truly be labeled FIRST IMPRESSIONS OR STRIKES! Usually only a handful of coins struck from newly made new dies put into service will be deeply proof-like in appearance. Also those properly described proof-like business strikes can come from dies put into service as many times as there are new dies made throughout any time of that year. This is my person thoughts and I wish others would "speak" on this subject. Pro or Con, this subject would make a good forum for PUBLIC thought. It is also possible to have just one side of a coin be considered a first strike from a newly, put into service die, that replace a previously damaged die side as long as the finished die produces some proof-like examples and is so described as a first impression from new dies THAT IS PROOF-LIKE IN APPEARANCE. 
What comes into "play" here is that if all the dies used to produce bullion coinage are sandblasted so that there is no such thing as PL surfaces, then none of the coinage now called "first strikes" from those types of working dies should be able to be advertised as first strikes unless all advertisers put a disclaimer into their ad's "DO NOT CONFUSE OUR "FIRST STRIKES" LABELING TO MEAN THAT OUR COINS WERE STRUCK FROM DIES NEWLY PRESSED INTO SERVICE, WITH FIRST STRIKES FROM NEW DIES, BUT THAT OUR FIRST STRIKES CAN BE PROVEN (RECEIVED) TO HAVE BEEN MINTED IN THE FIRST 30 (or less) DAYS OF THERE BEING MINTED! CONFUSED ALREADY?????????  I wish no harm to befall sellers of this marketing tool, but better talk now then make things worse in the future. Name withheld.
Editor's Note:  It should be noted that this is not a "new" label just now being applied to early releases of bullion coinage.  Certain dealers have been doing it for years.  This, of course, does not make it right.

Nienaber Finds DDD On Proof

    August 21, 2003 -- Larry Nienaber reports finding a very strong example of Die Deterioration Doubling on a 2003-S Missouri State quarter that he found in a clad proof set.  The clad quarter alloy is far more destructive to dies than silver.  This is the "type" of DDD that is rather typical of what we see from chromium plated dies such as those in standard use in Canada for their business strike and collector coins.
    Tests by the Royal Canadian Mint in the early 1940s indicated that chromium plated dies had a life of five to six times of that for unplated dies.  Dies traditionally yielding averages of 700,000 pieces were able to yield mintages up to five-million when chromium plated.
    Once the chromium plating wears and/or is polished away from selected areas of the die, those areas deteriorate more rapidly than protected areas.  The result is very strong doubling, often with a sharp boundary between it and the protected areas of the die that may appear normal with no signs of deterioration at all.  DDD is usually first evidenced around areas of greatest stress closest to the rim (such as lettering and other characters) and extends inwards to other designs on more extreme examples.
    While quite a bit of experimentation with chromium plated dies has taken place in the US Mints for a number of years, it appears that it's use has been largely restricted to proof coins struck from dies that are generally retired long before the effects of DDD take hold.  The use of chromium plating on proof dies not only extends their life but also imparts a more attractive mirror-like finish to areas of the coin were desired.
    While DDD has traditionally been considered more of a nuisance than a collectable by most variety coin specialists, it must be noted that it's appearance on US proof coins has been rare.  Nienaber wonders if it is destined to be considered a "modern day error on a proof" suggesting that perhaps it may be of interest to collectors in the absence of other types of errors getting out of the Mint in recent years.  We find it very interesting to see DDD on a US proof coin but have no idea of value or interest and present it here for its educational value only.  Time will tell if it catches on as a collectable.


New Cud Reported On Wash 25c

    August 15, 2003 -- Redford Jewelry & Coins of Redford, Michigan reports a Washington quarter with a large cud covering the date area that appears as though it may be a new one.  It is not listed in The Cud Book by Arnold Margolis and Sam Thurman.  The upper half of the obverse is also shown so that the hub type can be determined.


2002-P Struck Thru JFK Found In Mint Set


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter

    July 12,2003 -- Walt Flack of Smart Money in Michigan reports finding a 2002-P Kennedy half dollar in a government issue Mint set.  It looks like the die in the area of the final digit of the date and part of TRUST got clogged with "Mint goop" or "Mint grease" thereby not allowing the entire design to strike up.  Who says you can't find errors on recent coins!


Early Coins Got Struck Thru Too!


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter


Photo courtesy of Ken Potter

    July 12, 2003 -- Larry Allegrina of Michigan reports finding the 1878 Trade dollar (shown above) that is struck thru what appears to be wire or perhaps a bit of wiry scrap.  Neat!


Zapushek Reports New RPM $5 Gold!


Photo courtesy of Frank Zapushek

   June 09, 2003 -- CONECA Member, Frank Zapushek (Mr. Z) of Baker Numismatics reports finding this super Repunched Mint Mark (RPM) on an 1848-D Coronet Half Eagle!  James Wiles has listed it as RPM-001.


First Report On Sac "Spiked Head" Proof $1!


Photo courtesy of Al Lavoie

    June 03, 2003 -- Al Lavoie of  Connecticut is first to report to us (through Numismatic News) a proof 2003-S Sacagawea dollar with what appears to be a "Spiked Head" die crack.  The set has yet to be sent in for positive confirmation that it is in fact a die crack but it does appear to be so in the image.  It was found in a clad set.  More on this one as we hear more later.

Recent Finds! invites collectors to send in images of coins that feature an interesting error or variety that they have found recently.  Sent them with your name, name of photographer (if different) and a bit of information as to how, when and where you found the coin.  Use of images will depend on their quality, significance of the error/variety, and other technical factors.  The act of submitting material shall constitute an expressed warranty by the contributor that the material is original and owned by the submitter; if not, the source and permission must be provided.  Send to: conecawebmaster@koinpro.com 


Opinions expressed in articles or other features posted on the CONECA web site do not necessarily represent official CONECA policy or those of it's officers.  The act of submitting material shall constitute an expressed warranty by the contributor that the material is original; if not, the source and permission must be provided.



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